P.E.I.: Students celebrate Francophone Immigration Week

Students celebrate Francophone Immigration Week

Samuel Nionzima (second from right), at École Évangéline.Submitted photoSamuel Nionzima (second from right), at École Évangéline.

Published on November 6, 2012 
Stephen Brun  RSS Feed

SUMMERSIDE – Samuel Niyonzima knows what it’s like for newcomers trying to fit in to a new Island community.

The 19-year-old first immigrated to P.E.I. from Burundi, Africa, 10 years ago. Samuel began the process of learning French at his new school, Ecole Evangeline in Abram-Village. Continue reading

Spencer Fernando: “This is why I oppose the creation of a Racialized Representative.”

We are more than the colour of our skin

Posted November 5th, 2012 by Spencer Fernando
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ra·cial·ize

verb (used with object), ra·cial·ized, ra·cial·iz·ing.

1: To impose a racial interpretation on; place in a racial context.
2: To perceive, view, or experience in a racial context.
3: To categorize or differentiate on the basis of race. Continue reading

Strangers in New Homelands conference brings immigrant issues to light

Strangers in New Homelands conference brings immigrant issues to light
Posted November 5th, 2012 by Quinn Richert 
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University of Manitoba faculties of sociology and social work hosted their fifth annual Strangers in New Homelands: Deconstructing and Reconstructing “Home” Among Immigrants and Refugees in the Diaspora conference last Thursday and Friday. The conference brought together social workers, government officials, academics, and students to discuss issues critical to the experience of newly settled immigrants, especially in Canada and the United States. Continue reading

Federal government to accept 25,000 parents and grandparents under family reunification plan

News conference. During a press congerence yesterday at the Delta Meadowvale Hotel & Conference Centre, Immigration Minister Jason Kenney announces that the federal government will accept 25,000 parents and grandparents under its family reunification plan. Supplied photo

John Stewart
Nov 06, 2012 – 8:58 AM

Immigration family plan is working: Kenney

News conference. During a press congerence yesterday at the Delta Meadowvale Hotel & Conference Centre, Immigration Minister Jason Kenney announces that the federal government will accept 25,000 parents and grandparents under its family reunification plan.

Supplied photo
The federal government’s scheme to reunify families faster is working, Immigration Minister Jason Kenney said yesterday in Mississauga.
“We listened to Canadians who told us the old program with eight-year wait times just didn’t work,” Kenney told a press conference at the Delta Meadowvale Hotel & Conference Centre. Continue reading

Wanted for murder in the U.S., man gets permanent residency in Canada

 

Kai-Guo Huang is wanted in the U.S. in connection with a grisly murder and decapitation 14 years ago.

Wanted for murder in the U.S., man gets permanent residency in Canada

Hoi Yang, 27, was murdered, in Pemberton Township on July 27, 1998.

Published 32 minutes ago
Kai-Guo Huang, 35, was arrested in Toronto recently for driving under the influence of intoxicants. Huang had a murder warrant in effect for the 1998 slaying of a man in Philadelphia.
Andrew Livingstone
Toronto Star Staff Reporter


“If your candidate loses tomorrow, don’t come here!”

If your candidate loses tomorrow, don’t come here  

By Emily Sohn, Discovery News

Discovery News Monday, Nov 5, 2012 Every election season, Americans threaten to move to Canada if their candidates lose. This year is no different — and it doesn’t matter which political party voters belong to. When prompted with, “Moving to Canada if,” Google offers both “…Obama gets reelected” and “…Romney wins” as suggested endings. Both searches turn up millions of hits. But setting up life in another country is more complicated than many people think, experts say. And although many Americans happily relocate — often for reasons unrelated to politics — their new reality is not necessarily as idyllic as some may hope. Canada, after all, has problems, too. Continue reading

Canada to admit about 1,000 fewer immigrants on humanitarian and compassionate grounds

Immigration Minister Jason Kenney
Photograph by: Patrick Doyle/The Canadian Press , Postmedia News

Canada to admit 1,000 fewer newcomers on humanitarian grounds
By Tobi Cohen, Postmedia News November 5, 2012

Immigration Minister Jason Kenney
Photograph by: Patrick Doyle/The Canadian Press , Postmedia News

OTTAWA — Citizenship and Immigration is reducing the number of immigrants it accepts into Canada on public policy and humanitarian and compassionate grounds, according to figures released quietly late Monday.

Though it appears the government is drastically reducing the stream by 6,500, officials say they’ve actually re-jigged their categories this year and that Canada will admit about 1,000 fewer newcomers on humanitarian and compassionate grounds, according to the 2013 immigration targets. Continue reading

President of Jupia Consultants Inc. wants higher immigration levels

 

Adriana Campbell | David Campbell

Why immigration limits hurt Canada’s mid-sized cities
DAVID CAMPBELL 
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Nov. 05 2012, 8:27 AM EST
Last updated Monday, Nov. 05 2012, 8:33 AM EST
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Immigration Minister Jason Kenney recently tweeted the following: “In 2013 we’ll keep immigration levels at ~250,000. The NDP says we should increase immigration by 40 per cent to at least 350,000.What do you think?” He went on to further tweet that 90 per cent of Canadians oppose higher immigration levels.

I wonder if those 90 per cent of Canadians understand just how important immigrants are to population growth across Canada – particularly in the country’s growing mid-sized urban centres? Continue reading

Canadian Immigration Department details its achievements

Canadian Immigration Department Details its Achievements, Expects Reduction in Wait Times
Posted on November 5, 2012


CIC plans to adopt an Expression of Interest (EOI) model for the Federal Skilled Worker Program similar to that in place in New Zealand.
Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) summarized what it considers the successes of its reforms in recent years in a press release on Friday. CIC said that it expects that by the end of 2013, it will be able to process applications as they are received, and complete their processing within one year. Continue reading