‘The Nova Scotia Home for Colored Children’ is at the centre of a lawsuit and a controversy with allegations of physical and sexual abuse stretching back decades. Three former residents tell their story to CBC’s The Current. (CBC)

 

Two girls work on crafts in the Nova Scotia Home for Colored Children, while a caretaker helps them. (Courtesy Nova Scotia Archives)

Abuse Allegations: The Nova Scotia Home for Colored Children
WARNING: Parts of the following discussion are graphic and disturbing
CBC News Posted: Nov 7, 2012 2:39 PM AT Last Updated: Nov 12, 2012 6:20 PM AT
‘The Nova Scotia Home for Colored Children’ is at the centre of a lawsuit and a controversy with allegations of physical and sexual abuse stretching back decades. Three former residents tell their story to CBC’s The Current. (CBC) Facebook

It is a shelter for young people with a name from the past that can still make you flinch: “The Nova Scotia Home for Colored Children” is at the centre of a lawsuit and a controversy with allegations of physical and sexual abuse stretching back decades. The Current hears from three former residents and from the Nova Scotia government minister responsible for the file.

Abuse Allegations: The Nova Scotia Home for Colored Children

If former residents of the place still called Nova Scotia Home for Colored Children are telling the truth, it may be more accurate to call them former victims. The home first opened in 1921 as an orphanage for black Nova Scotian children.

It’s intent was to give them safe shelter, but their stories of physical and sexual abuse suggest childhoods filled with fear, pain and despair. More than 100 former residents are involved in legal action, including a proposed class action suit, against the institution and the provincial government.

Anna Maria spoke with three former residents and their lawyer yesterday. Tony Smith was in Halifax along with lawyer Ray Wagner. Harriet Johnson was in Montreal. And June Elwin joined us in Toronto.

* A WARNING, parts of the discussion are graphic and disturbing. At a point in the conversation, Harriet describes a violent sexual assault… a scene so graphic and horrific, we are not airing it in full. We did continue the conversation with Harriet and picked up again.

Nova Scotia’s Minister of Justice – Ross Landry

We requested an interview with Veronica Marsman, the current executive director of The Nova Scotia Home for Colored Children. She said she’d call us back, but hasn’t.

However, Ross Landry, Nova Scotia’s Minister of Justice joined us by phone from Halifax.

This segment was produced by Halifax Network Producer, Mary Lynk.

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Clearing confusion about Nova Scotia Home for Colored Children

REPORTED BY
Jacob Boon

 

 

 

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Article posted in Abuse/Child abuse/Beaten to death, African community, Communities, Crime, Crime (type), Immigration, Multiculturalism, Non-African black community
  • CanadianImmigrationReport

    Veronica Marsman: Emergency Management Office

    Doing what’s best when the worst happens – that’s Veronica’s career in a nutshell.

    As a social worker with the Department of Community Services for 24 years, she has helped families in times of crisis to deal with their children, assisted in placing children and youth in alternate care and has worked with foster parents and DCS staff to improve services to children and families.

    Today she is applying her leadership skills and knowledge of emergency procedures to help government departments ensure that critical services will continue to function when a crisis occurs. This involves working with department Business Continuity Coordinators to help them identify threats and prepare appropriate response plans. Veronica wants Nova Scotian’s safety to be assured, so she makes sure these plans are exercised and maintained.

    A Senior Project Manager in the Business Continuity Management Office (EMO-NS), Veronica is currently the President of the Canadian Association of Social Workers and the North American Vice- President for the International Federation of Social Workers. Attending the national and international meetings associated with these positions has allowed her to bring back learning about disaster planning, poverty issues, child welfare matters, and how to work effectively with disadvantaged people, for the benefit of all Nova Scotians.

    http://novascotia.ca/psc/employeeCentre/recognition/publicServiceWeek/publicServiceWeekBios.asp

  • FourFooted_Messiah

    “Home for Coloured Children”? What kind of archaic language is that?

    Sarcasm aside, I wonder if this isn’t a case of “me, too” after the residential schools/Mt Cashel thing. “Oh, the Indians got something, I want something too.”

    And I’m even wondering about the former. Maybe there were one or two cases of abuse (sickos existed in every generation), but the sheer volume says “me, too” syndrome.