SOCIETY AT LARGE: Trivializing Rape

August 8, Montreal


A gaggle of feminists with male satellites in tow flocked to Bethune Square in Montreal to manifest against rape culture and peripherally the presence of Roosh V in the city.

The assumption here, for any reasonable person hearing the term rape culture for the first time, is that these women are raising awareness towards sexual violence, which would be more than laudable. Unfortunately, this is very much not the case as it was explained by the first speaker.

During the opening remarks, rape was defined as employment discrimination, racism, intolerance, emotional aggression and another half dozen or so social issues not even remotely related to forceful sexual intercourse. Apparently, third-wave feminists have openly appropriated this horrific word and redefined the crime of rape to include any emotional (but especially female) feelings of powerlessness.2015-08-08 12.32.57_resize

In their view, the term rape is transposed to mean something violent on a purely meta-linguistic level, a sort of brutally poetic description of catching a man peeking at a woman’s cleavage for instance.

However, the common definition of rape is not terribly ambiguous. These girls are using the word because it instantly elicits sympathy. Absolutely nobody but a sociopath would “support” a rape culture, and they hedge on this fact to gather crowds. Their crusade against “rape culture” oversimplifies the world of sexual dynamics, trying to expand the notion of actual rape to other types of interaction (kissing, touching, etc.).

Two ineloquent keynote speakers went on to talk about consent, which they did not even attempt to clearly define. This is consistent with their very overt and awkward attempts to swim in a linguistic morass of victim buzzwords and hazy concepts. Since they have desexualized the term rape, then what is the definition of consent and how does one “obtain” it? No clear answer was given.

Dr. David A. Yeagley (1951-2014)

David Yeagley is with us no more.

David, descendent of Comanche leader Bad Eagle, was a bird of a rare feather. His voice was a lone dissenter, appealing for Whites to look to the contemporary plight of Native Americans as an insight into the future of being a minority culture in our own land. David cautioned us with a unique perspective towards immigration which unfortunately too few have yet heard.

Our deepest gratitude to David for permitting this interview filmed at the 2012 American Renaissance conference.

CIR expresses sincere condolences to his family, friends and fans.

Be sure that David will be missed but certainly not forgotten by those he has touched.

CIR Interviews: American Renaissance 2012

Paul Fromm @ American Renaissance 2012 |

Tito Perdue @ American Renaissance 2012 |

The Source Newspaper interview: CIReport on de-stereotyping perceptions of violence


Article and full CIReport interview 

De-stereotyping perceptions of violence
May 21, 2012 by Phoebe Yu

In Vancouver, there has been evidence of negative perceptions, when it comes to certain cultures being seen as violent.

When it comes to public views on violence, it is dependent on the existing social narrative.