HIJAB AND HIGH HEELS

HIJAB AND HIGH HEELS

By Madi Lussier
Wednesday, September 10, 2008

In the western world, covered women are not something out of the ordinary anymore.  One can see them everywhere, sometimes in the least expected places such as cosmetics departments, looking for hair dye, make up or simply in a women’s garments department, admiring some very sexy lingerie.
One can see them on the beach, at festivals, you name it, perhaps on a mission given by their imam.
I might say that these covered women want to prove us, maybe a bit too hard, that they feel integrated in this society. Plus, I might deduce that our world pleases them much more than their world. Here, covered or not, a woman can walk hand in hand with her partner, a serious misconduct punishable in an Islamic country, governed by Sharia. They can sit at the same table at a restaurant and enjoy their meal together, as a civilized couple.
The debate over the wearing of the hijab, nikab or burka in our world has not ended and it is not likely to end too soon.
Opinions are divided between those who defend the Islamic clothes, considering that they do not interfere with the values of a secular society and those who are against these garments as they are perceived as segregationist and insulting to western women and their history of fight for equal rights, respect and freedoms.
Those who wear a hijab in Canada also defend the headdress as they declare that wearing it is their free decision.

Hungarian Roma family hiding in Hungary can return to Canada

Canada’s door reopened to deported Roma family

After years of living in hiding on two continents, the Pusuma family has been thrown a lifeline by the Trudeau government, which has agreed to allow them to return to Canada on humanitarian and compassionate grounds.

Jozsef Pusuma, his wife, Timea Daroczi, and their daughter Viktoria (Lulu) have received word from the Trudeau government that they can finally call Canada home. The family, whown in 2014, had previously sought sanctuary in a Toronto church for three years before returning to Hungary after losing their asylum claim.

NICHOLAS KEUNG / TORONTO STAR FILE PHOTO

Jozsef Pusuma, his wife, Timea Daroczi, and their daughter Viktoria (Lulu) have received word from the Trudeau government that they can finally call Canada home. The family, whown in 2014, had previously sought sanctuary in a Toronto church for three years before returning to Hungary after losing their asylum claim.

Canada’s door has reopened for a Roma family who were forced to leave the country after they lost their asylum claim amid a long battle to bring their disgraced former lawyer to justice.

After years of living in hiding on two continents — including three years in a Toronto church — Jozsef Pusuma, his wife, Timea Daroczi, and their daughter Viktoria (Lulu) have received word from the Trudeau government that they can finally call Canada home.

The Pusumas left Canada in December 2014 before Toronto lawyer Viktor Hohots admitted to a Law Society Tribunal to professional misconduct in relation to 17 complaints from Roma refugee claimants.

Hohots was suspended from practice for five months and barred from practising refugee law for two years.

The Pusumas had spent three years in sanctuary in a Toronto church and were clinging to the slim hope Canada would allow them to return on humanitarian and compassionate grounds for the wrong done by their former lawyer. They have been in hiding in Hungary ever since.

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BRAMPTON “HONOUR KILLING”? Sukhchain Brar charged with murder of wife found in scorched truck

Brampton man charged with murder of wife found in scorched truck

OPP found body of Gurpreet K. Brar in vehicle on westbound Highway 402 at 3:15 a.m.

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Police say the body of 37-year-old Gurpreet K. Brar was discovered inside the scorched truck, and was sent to the Office of the Chief Coroner for examination.

A Brampton man has been charged in his wife’s death following a tractor-trailer fire near Sarnia on Sunday, police say.

The OPP responded to reports of a vehicle fire in the westbound lanes of Highway 402 near the Camlachie Rd. overpass at 3:15 a.m.

Police say the body of 37-year-old Gurpreet K. Brar was discovered inside the scorched truck, and was sent to the Office of the Chief Coroner for examination.

On Wednesday, police arrested Sukhchain Brar, 50, and charged him with first-degree murder.

Lambton OPP Const. Chris Doupe confirmed the accused and the deceased were spouses.

Brar is due to appear in Sarnia court Thursday.

Journalist Baltej Pannu granted bail in India

Punjabi-Canadian journalist Baltej Pannu granted bail

A fixture on GTA radio and televisions, his colleagues hope Baltej Pannu can soon return to the airwaves.

 Punjabi-Canadian journalist Baltej Pannu has been granted bail in India.FACEBOOK

Punjabi-Canadian journalist Baltej Pannu has been granted bail in India.

Punjabi-Canadian journalist Baltej Pannu could soon be free from jail after an Indian high court approved his bail application on Wednesday, according to his family.

Pannu, a former Brampton resident who still appears regularly on GTA radio and television, was arrested in Punjab in late November on charges of rape, cheating, and intimidation.

Supporters are adamant the charges against Pannu — a journalist, social activist and political satirist — are politically motivated.

“He was confident that he would get bail from the high court and he was confident in the judicial system of India,” his son Jasdeep Pannu told the Star from Surrey, B.C.

Jasdeep has not been in touch with his father since he was arrested, but said his mother, who lives in Punjab, has visited her husband regularly in jail.

The couple have lived together there for the last five years, reuniting after Pannu spent 25 years living in Canada.

She reports her husband is in good health and “very strong morally,” Jasdeep said.

He’s looking forward to a chance to speak with his father after months of being cut off.

“I have a lot of things to say and words are gong to be left,” he said. “When you talk to a person twice a day, and then you suddenly can’t talk to them for 67 days it’s a weird feeling.”

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Jian Ghomeshi trial: Lucy DeCoutere wrote accused that she wanted to have sex with him after alleged assault

Jian Ghomeshi trial: Lucy DeCoutere wrote accused that she wanted to have sex with him after alleged assault

‘I am sad we didn’t spend the night together’, DeCoutere wrote Ghomeshi

By Mark Gollom, CBC News Posted: Feb 05, 2016 5:00 AM ET Last Updated: Feb 05, 2016 8:57 PM ET

Jian Ghomeshi leaves a Toronto courthouse after the fourth day of his sexual assault trial wrapped up.

Jian Ghomeshi leaves a Toronto courthouse after the fourth day of his sexual assault trial wrapped up. (David Donelly/CBC)

Lucy DeCoutere emailed Jian Ghomeshi hours after an alleged sexual assault saying she wanted to have sex with him, and sent him a handwritten letter days later saying she was sad they didn’t spend the night together, court heard today.

Lucy DeCoutere

“You kicked my ass last night and that makes me want to f–k your brains out tonight,” DeCoutere emailed Ghomeshi about 1:30 a.m.

It was one of a series of emails unveiled by Ghomeshi’s lawyer, Marie Henein, sent to the former CBC Radio host by the Trailer Park Boysactress in the years following the alleged assault. DeCoutere claims she was choked and slapped by Ghomeshi at his Toronto home following a dinner date in July 2003.

​Ghomeshi, 48, who lives in Toronto, has pleaded not guilty in provincial court to four counts of sexual assault and one count of overcoming resistance by choking, all related to alleged assaults from 2002 to 2003. A judge alone is hearing the case.

The identities of the two other complainants in the case are protected under a publication ban, but DeCoutere, also an air force captain, went to court to lift the ban on her name.

HALIFAX: Two Chinese start mental health group for students from China

Halifax Chinese language mental health support group starting

Peer support group designed to reduce stress, isolation

By Shaina Luck, Nelson Xie, CBC News Posted: Aug 17, 2015 6:20 AM AT Last Updated: Aug 17, 2015 5:51 PM AT

Minzhou Sun (left) and Jinbo Chen are working to set up a mental health peer support group that will offer help in Chinese.

Minzhou Sun (left) and Jinbo Chen are working to set up a mental health peer support group that will offer help in Chinese. (Shaina Luck / CBC)

Two Chinese-Nova Scotians are setting up a mental health support service aimed at the growing community of international students from China.

They say there are few mental health options in other languages, and that causes many Mandarin and Cantonese speakers to turn away from help.

“I’ve always had a passion to help newcomers,” said Jinbo Chen, one of the organizers. “Mental health issues are one of the issues that I really care about.”

Chen moved to Halifax in 2002 as a university student, and remained in Halifax to work and raise a family. 

He says Chinese international students face stress and mental health issues for many reasons, including loneliness and isolation, workload, and parental expectations. 

“A high percentage of them, it’s not because they want to come here — their parents want them to come here,” Chen said. “If they cannot achieve a certain level or score, it might have some stress with their family.”

Chen said many students are also coming to university in their late teens or early 20s, and may struggle with issues such as what direction to take, addiction problems, or romantic problems, all of which could contribute to mental health problems.

‘They preferred to speak to a person who speaks Chinese’