Previously deported Nigerian student back into Canada

Previously deported Nigerian student looks forward to convocation in Regina

Victoria Ordu and Favour Amadi hid in churches more than 450 days before being deported for working off-campus

CBC News Posted: May 13, 2016 9:18 PM CT Last Updated: May 13, 2016 9:18 PM CT

Victoria Ordu has completed her degree at University of Regina and will attend a convocation ceremony in June.

Victoria Ordu has completed her degree at University of Regina and will attend a convocation ceremony in June. (Radio-Canada)

Earning a university degree is no easy feat, but Victoria Ordu is especially proud to convocate this spring, after her studies became the subject of national news. She spent time in hiding and was eventually deported during the time she was planning to work on her degree.

“By this time two years ago, I didn’t think I was going to be done with school or my major graduating. I’m like, ‘Oh my god, my life is over,'” she said in an interview with CBC. “But here I am, I’m still breathing.”

The international student first arrived at University of Regina from Nigeria in 2009. In 2011, she and another Nigerian student, Favour Amadi, worked a couple of weeks at a Wal-Mart store off-campus before learning their student visas didn’t allow it.

Seeking sanctuary in Saskatchewan

That’s when Canadian Border Services got involved— and so did officials, including the Canadian and Saskatchewan governments and the University president, among others. Facing deportation, and communicating through an immigration consultant working on their behalf, the women hid in churches around Regina for more than 450 days while officials outside argued about their situation.

29-year-old Sudanese claims he didn’t know he was 29

‘Teen’ basketball player says he didn’t know he was 29

Jonathan Nicola told officials he wasn’t lying when he allegedly posed as a teenager to attend high school in Canada — he just didn’t know his real age.

Jonathan Nicola, 29, was detained by Canada Border Services Agency officials after allegedly posing as a 17-year-old high school student in Windsor. The 6-foot-9 Nicola is shown in action on the Catholic Central High School’s basketball team.

A 29-year-old South Sudanese man told officials he wasn’t lying when he allegedly posed as a teenager to attend high school in Canada — he just didn’t know his real age.

(…)

“I aways keep asking what is the specific age that I was born, and she has told me that she could not remember,” he told the April 19 hearing.

“Over (in South Sudan) . . . not every year we study . . . we always keep moving to different schools, and over there, they do not ask your age. They do not ask you nothing,” Nicola said.

(…)

“I am not a liar person. I am religious. I pray to God . . . If something bad happen to me here, I do not know what would happen to my mother back home because she is really sick. She has diabetes,” Nicola said.

According to a transcript of the April 19 hearing, Nicola arrived at Pearson International Airport last Nov. 23 on a student visa to attend Catholic Central Secondary School in Windsor on a full scholarship.

Somali Ayanle Hassan Ali, accused in military centre stabbing, once worked at Pearson airport

Ayanle Hassan Ali, accused in military centre stabbing, once worked at Pearson airport

Airport authority confirms Ali had access to restricted areas for a period 6 years ago

CBC News Posted: Mar 16, 2016 6:32 PM ET Last Updated: Mar 16, 2016 6:58 PM ET

Ayanle Hassan Ali, 27, is facing nine criminal charges following an attack on a Canadian Forces recruitment centre in Toronto. Officials at Toronto's Pearson airport confirmed Wednesday that he had once worked there for a third-party tenant.

Ayanle Hassan Ali, 27, is facing nine criminal charges following an attack on a Canadian Forces recruitment centre in Toronto. Officials at Toronto’s Pearson airport confirmed Wednesday that he had once worked there for a third-party tenant. (Toronto Police Service)

The man accused of attacking a Canadian Forces recruitment centre in Toronto once worked for several months at Pearson International Airport and had access to restricted areas.

Ayanle Hassan Ali, a 27-year-old born in Montreal who has lived in Toronto from the age of two, faces nine criminal charges including three counts of attempted murder following Monday’s attack, which sent two members of the military to hospital with minor injuries.

RACISM ALLEGATIONS: 23-year-old Mactar Mbaye interviews woman for a job at coffee shop, mistaken for a pimp

 
CTV Montreal: Black entrepreneur dismayed by 911 call
Mactar Mbaye was interviewing a woman for a job at a Laval coffee shop and someone thought he was a pimp recruiting her.
CTVNews.ca Staff
Published Thursday, February 25, 2016 7:51PM EST

A young black man interviewing a woman in a Quebec coffee shop was mistaken for a pimp soliciting a sex worker, causing a customer to call 911.

Mactar Mbaye, a 23-year-old entrepreneur, says he was confused when police officers arrived at the Laval, Que., Tim Hortons last Thursday and asked for a word alone.

SOMALI COMMUNITY: Imam Abdi Hersy not deported in relation to sex assault case

Deportation order against Calgary Imam halted

Imam Abdi Hersy Imam Abdi Hersy will not be deported in relation to a sex assault case.

Cynthia RoebuckCynthia Roebuck, Anchor/Reporter

@CTVCRoebuck

Published Saturday, February 13, 2016 1:55PM MST
Last Updated Saturday, February 13, 2016 4:35PM MST

Imam Abdi Hersy will not be deported from Canada for now based on sex assault allegations in the U.S.

The prominent leader in Calgary’s Somali community is accused of sexually assaulting two women while he worked as a respiratory therapist in Minnesota in 2006.

Hersy says he is innocent, and has tried to go back to the states to face the charges, but was deported back to Canada.

Ottawa has tried to revoke Hersy’s refugee status, but he successfully appealed, and a federal court judge decided on February 12, 2016 that Hersy can stay in Canada.

“I was excited,” said Imam Hersy. “I knew the law was on my side all the time. This is the second time I won in a federal court. And I’m excited, I’m happy that justice is finally served.”

The federal court has decided the matter will now go to another immigration and refugee board member for re-consideration.

Marc Wabafiyebazu charged with first-degree murder in double killing in Miami

Canadian diplomat picking up pieces of shattered life as son sentenced in killings

COLIN PERKEL, THE CANADIAN PRESS

FIRST POSTED: | UPDATED:

Marc Wabafiyebazu

Marc Wabafiyebazu charged with first-degree murder in double killing in Miami

Marc Wabafiyebazu, 15, appears in adult criminal court for his arraignment, Monday, April 20, 2015, in Miami. Wabafiyebazu, the son of a Canadian diplomat charged with first-degree murder in a double killing in Miami, is expected to plead guilty to reduced charges Friday. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Walter Michot/The Miami Herald via AP, Pool)
The unease Canada’s top diplomat in Miami was feeling as her car threaded its way to work that bright, warm early morning was becoming more insistent.

Her phone rang.

“Are your kids OK?” a senior official at Canada’s Embassy in Washington was asking.

“And then,” Roxanne Dube says in her French-accented lilt, “I knew something was not correct.”

As she would later discover, local authorities had contacted the U.S. State Department, which had in turn contacted the Canadian Embassy. Her unease turned to alarm as, at the urging of her embassy contact, she directed her driver to a hospital, where she was ushered into a VIP room. Someone handed her a piece of paper with a phone number to call for information. She did.

“I’m afraid I have bad news, I think we should meet,” Det. Rolando Garcia was saying. “And he said: ‘Jean is dead.’ I knew it was true because of the way he pronounced Jean’s name.”

Dube dropped the phone. Her world had imploded that sunny day on March 31, 2015. Dube could barely stagger outside.

Now 53, Dube had arrived from Ottawa with her two teen sons exactly two months earlier to take up her post as Canada’s consul general in Miami. It had been a whirlwind of wrapping up her old job — she had been director general for North America, helping oversee Canada’s consular network in the U.S. and Mexico — finding housing, moving, unpacking, getting the boys settled in school.