Category Archives: Asian community

MISSISSAUGA: Jeong Moon Youn clocks 230km/h on highway

Ontario News

MISSISSAUGA, Ont. – Police say a 22-year-old man has been charged with stunt driving after his BMW clocked at nearly 230 kilometres an hour on a 100 km/h highway in Mississauga, Ont.

Ontario Provincial Police say Songmao Li, of Mississauga, was stopped by an officer conducting speed enforcement on Highway 403 near Ellington Avenue early Thursday.

In a separate incident, police say a Mercedes-Benz was observed travelling at more than 200 km/h on Highway 400 near Finch Avenue in Toronto.

Twenty-nine-year-old Jeong Moon Youn of North York has been charged with stunt driving in that case.Police say both drivers had their licences suspended and their vehicles were impounded for seven days.

The OPP said earlier this week that speed was a factor in 51 deaths on Ontario’s roads this year.

The force says it is joining other police services across the country to launch Operation Impact — a road safety enforcement and education campaign — ahead of the Thanksgiving long weekend.

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Hat tip Spirit Wolf

RICHMOND, B.C.: Mayoral contender Lifeng Wei wants to implement Chinese-style city policies

ELECTION 2014: Civic pay, Chinese signs focus of Richmond mayoral debate

Richmond mayoral candidates Malcolm Brodie, Richard Lee and Cliff Lifeng Wei.  - Matthew Hoekstra

Richmond mayoral candidates Malcolm Brodie, Richard Lee andCliff Lifeng Wei.

— Image Credit: Matthew Hoekstra

In the wake of a report documenting a rapid rise in municipal compensation, Richmond Mayor Malcolm Brodie defended city workers’ salaries in a Thursday mayoral debate.

Brodie, campaigning for a seventh term in the Nov. 15 vote, said unionized workers’ pay is governed by negotiated agreements. As for management—who are paid too much according to an Ernst and Young report made public last month—Brodie said “it’s all relative.”

“If we don’t pay our management enough, then they go somewhere else,” he said in front of a Minoru Place Activity Centre crowd of approximately 250 people. “That’s a huge cost, when you lose a longtime employee and that person goes elsewhere. So you have to pay market rate to your employees, and it’s also a matter of fairness.”

To probe municipal pay, the province hired consultants Ernst and Young, whose report criticized cities for allowing pay levels to climb by 38 per cent—twice the rate of the provincial public service—from 2001-12. The report also suggested municipal managers are paid too much and recommended the province take strong action to curb the trend.

Richard Lee, who is making a second run at the mayor’s job and running with Richmond Reform, said staff are entitled to their current deals, but suggested there’s room for wage scrutiny.

“I believe in the free market, we could have and in the future we will under my leadership, to hire somebody at a reasonable rate, not at the alarming rate that was shared with us in that study…”

Richmond City Hall’s payroll has grown by $15 million in five years. The city’s top earner is chief administrative officer George Duncan, who made $291,250 last year. Department heads also score high on the pay scale, as five of six general managers topped the $200,000 mark in 2013.

Thursday’s short debate, organized by the Richmond Centre for Disability, served as a prelude to a much larger forum featuring 28 candidates running for councillor.

Mayoral candidates also waded into the contentious waters of Chinese-only signs. Lee said they’re “not a good thing.” Some will argue for freedom of expression, he said, but added “all rights are conditional.” Continue reading

Lack of ethnic organ donors on Canadian registry frightening

October 18, 2014 10:42 pm

Bone marrow recipient urges ethnic donors to join registry

By   Global News

VANCOUVER — As hundreds run and walk through Lumberman’s Arch in Stanley Park tonight as part of the fight against Leukemia, Christina Law is particularly grateful for their support.

The 38-year-old was first diagnosed with the disease in 2003 and though her doctors wanted to perform a bone marrow transplant, she couldn’t find a match. Law was treated with high-dose chemotherapy, and was in remission for 10 years.

Unfortunately, in 2012 she had to fight for her life again when she was diagnosed with another blood disorder.  This time, a bone marrow transplant was the only option. She found a match and had the procedure, but it didn’t work as well as doctors had hoped. In a few weeks, with thanks to an anonymous donor, Law will be undergoing a second transplant.

“It’s like a ticking time bomb inside me and I don’t know whether things will go even worse, to the point that the doctor cannot save my life. It’s very scary,” Law toldGlobal News.

What is particularly frightening is the lack of ethnic donors on the Canadian registry. Only one in four are non-Caucasians.

Read More: Montreal woman who pleaded with B.C. residents to save her life finds umbilical cord donor

“A patient’s chance of finding a match within their own ethnic background is much, much higher,” says Law.

That’s why Law has become an advocate with the Chinese Stem Cell Initiative and urges people to take five minutes to sign up online with the bone marrow donor registry.

(…)

–With files from Elaine Yong.

BURNABY, B.C.: Mayoral candidate Sylvia Gung wants to ban any display of affection, from wedding kisses to holding hands

You may not kiss the bride.

That’s what grooms will be told at the altar if this Burnaby mayoral candidate wins the Nov. 15 election.

Sylvia Gung is running on a platform to create a “wholesome society,” which would mean banning any public displays of affection including wedding kisses and holding hands in public.

These behaviours “hurt public decorum and lead to further violence,” according to Gung’s profile on the city’s website.

This is Gung’s second run for the mayor’s seat.

She’s up against incumbent Mayor Derek Corrigan, who has held the position for 12 years. Corrigan is known for his adamant opposition to Kinder Morgan’s proposed pipeline expansion.

There are four other candidates vying for the city’s top job.

Helen Hee Soon Chang, who has been elected as a school trustee, organizes multicultural forums and would strive to boost safety and inclusivity.

Realtor Raj Gupta, who ran unsuccessfully for the B.C. Conservative Party in the 2013 provincial election, promises to cut property taxes and improve spending.

Entrepreneur Daren Hancott, leader of the Burnaby First party, pledges his management expertise will make him a capable leader at City Hall.

Allan Hutton, a longtime Burnaby resident and volunteer, wants to preserve the city’s natural areas and create an accountable government.

VANCOUVER: City’s real estate market invaded by millionaire Chinese immigrants

Vancouver’s real estate boom: The rising price of ‘heaven’

IAIN MARLOW AND BRENT JANG

VANCOUVER — The Globe and Mail

Published 

Last updated 

 Qiqi Hong walks past her sleek, blue-tiled hot tub and an infinity pool that seems to disappear like a waterfall into the chilly air above West Vancouver. She leans on the patio railing and breathes in the majestic ocean view that takes in the towering Douglas firs of Stanley Park, the skyscrapers of Vancouver, the Asia-bound freighters anchored in English Bay and – way off in the misty distance – the faint, rugged outline of Gabriola Island.

“We’re in heaven,” says Ms. Hong. “I can’t find any house that can compare to my house.”

The serene West Coast lifestyle did not come cheaply: Ms. Hong’s home cost $6-million. But it is an investment she can easily afford. The irrepressible businesswoman founded a successful lighting-design business in Beijing that thrived in China’s building boom. It now has more than 100 employees. But tired of Beijing’s hectic pace and foul air, she decided to come to Vancouver – after looking in Switzerland, Germany and the United States – on the Canadian government’s immigrant investor program in 2011. She now also owns three other houses on Vancouver’s west side, each valued in excess of $1.3-million, as well as a downtown condo she uses on weekends and lends to visiting friends.

Demand from wealthy migrants from mainland China such as Ms. Hong has helped make the Vancouver area the most expensive real estate market in Canada. The average price of a single-family detached home is $1.26-million, higher than any other Canadian city. The rising flow of foreign capital – stemming from a long tradition of transpacific migration and investment – has turned Vancouver into a truly global real estate market. One large real estate firm calculated that roughly one-third of the detached homes it sold within the City of Vancouver last year went to buyers from China. Vancouver developers and real estate firms have hit the jackpot, and some have rushed to set up offices in Shanghai and Beijing. Some now say Vancouver is a bedroom community for the world.

The upscale Point Grey neighbourhood is on Vancouver’s west side, where benchmark prices for detached homes have soared. DARRYL DYCK FOR THE GLOBE AND MAIL

But Vancouver real estate prices have also become increasingly unhinged from local incomes, prompting concerns about affordability. It has led to middle– and even upper-middle class Vancouverites renting permanently or fleeing for cheaper suburbs such as Burnaby. There is a search for better data on foreign buyers, which is only haphazardly tracked. There is now a heated debate – that includes accusations of racism – about whether anything should be done to curb foreign buying, or if what is happening is simply an inevitable, and welcome, facet of globalization in a free market.

After all, the ebullient Ms. Hong hasn’t just bought houses here. She founded a charity with other wealthy migrants from China; the group just held a Thanksgiving lunch for 1,000 seniors and recently collected $250,000 for a local hospital and pet shelter. She has founded several businesses in Vancouver, including one in real estate, and drives to ESL classes. She’s learning English, and has even joined a protest, hitting the streets during the recent B.C. teachers’ strike. While she stays busy in Vancouver, her husband frequently flies to China to manage the firm.

In my opinion, I think it’s good for the economy,” Ms. Hong says, noting that the number of Chinese residents on her street has soared in recent years and that the local businessman she bought her house from made a cool $1.5-million more than he originally paid. “In Vancouver,” Ms. Hong says, “the house prices are perfect.”

(…)

TORONTO: During rapid-fire exchanges, mayoral candidate Olivia Chow translates in her head

Chow responds to column on her English-speaking ability

OLIVER MOORE The Globe and Mail

Published Last updated 

Olivia Chow likes to say that she’s not a “fast” or “smooth” talker. It’s a self-deprecating way to explain her occasional struggles to be heard amid bombastic mayoral debates.

It’s also an acknowledgement that her English – while perfectly understandable – isn’t as good as her opponents. (…)

“It may look to some voters, many of whom struggle with English, as if she doesn’t care enough about communicating with them to get her nouns and verbs to agree,” Rick Salutin wrote in Friday’s Toronto Star. “I’m not saying that’s so, I know it’s not. But we’re talking about impressions.”

Ms. Chow came to Canada from Hong Kong at the age of 13 and her background prompted racist heckling during at least one debate.

Her people have said that she is not as fast during rapid-fire exchanges because she translates in her head as she goes. The possible political drawbacks of her speaking ability have generally remained a taboo subject for pundits, though. And when the issue was raised she was quick to hit back.

“[He] needs to open [his] eyes and look at what this city represents,” Ms. Chow said Friday morning. A lot of people that live in this city speaks with an accent. But they become top surgeons, top scientists. It’s quite astounding that you have journalists that want to pick on my language capacity. I have no problem communicating, I don’t believe.”

The analysis was part of a list of “potential incitements” that Mr. Salutin suggested could be swaying public opinion. But Ms. Chow brushed it off.

“Actions speak louder than words, right,” she said. “You want a mayor that can get things done.”

Follow Oliver Moore on Twitter: @moore_oliver

Vancouver International Film Festival not enough Asian oriented ?

by CRAIG TAKEUCHI on OCT 6, 2014 at 4:02 PM

Vancouver Asahi stars Tsumabuki Satoshi and Kamenashi Kazuya drew crowds of fans to the Vancouver International Film Festival.
CRAIG TAKEUCHI

ANYONE WHO ATTENDEDThe Vancouver Asahi world premiere at the Vancouver International Film Festival on September 29 saw the intense J-power of the J-pop machine in full force.

 Japanese stars Tsumabuki Satoshi and Kamenashi Kazuya (who are actors as well as J-Pop stars) aren’t just big in Japan, but across Asia. And, as evidenced by the screaming throngs of fans at the Centre for Performing Arts, also around the world, including right here in little Vancouver.

Fans were not only vocal in their adoration, but also physical.

When the stars waltzed the red carpet, fans mobbed up against the line of security guards. At one point, the stars were ushered off the red carpet after the situation threatened to deteriorate.

A few days earlier, Vancouver was graced by another dazzling convoy of Asian stars: Abhishek Bachchan, Deepika Padukone, and Bollywood powerhouse Shah Rukh Khan. As Charlie Smith  reported, King Khan and his costars drew massive crowds to the Pacific Coliseum.

Of course, these aren’t the first or last times that Vancouver has seen the power of Asian stars to draw huge crowds, even if they fly under the radar of mainstream media.

However, there appears to be an opportunity for the Vancouver International Film Festival to recognize, should it be intent on balancing a commercially competitive future with an artistic one.

The Toronto International Film Festival has well established itself as a destination event for Hollywood’s glitterati. The VIFF has traditionally focussed more on being a filmmakers’ festival, and it can’t compete with TIFF for attracting stars. Well, from Hollywood, that is.

But contrary to what they’d have us believe (or beliebe, for all your Beliebers), there is a world beyond Hollywood.

Judging by this year’s changes at VIFF, there have been hints of more competitive marketing and a broader reach than in previous years, such as the creation of the new Style in Film series and the merger of the two print guides into one. Continue reading

Monkland Village, MONTREAL: Alleged hate crime targeting Jewish, Chinese and Vietnamese businesses

Posted on 10/1/2014 11:53:00 AM by Patrick Lejtenyi

Photo by Patrick Lejtenyi

Merchants in the Monkland Village are wondering if they’ve been the target of a possible hate crime.

Following an early morning fire on Friday, the Jewish owner of dog grooming salon discovered three swastikas and a pentagram spray painted in the hallway connecting his store to those of his neighbours — one of the owners is Chinese, the other Vietnamese.

Kobi Ben-Jacob says he only discovered the swastikas on Monday morning after he dealt with the smoke and water damage from the fire on Friday — the second day of Rosh Hashanah.

He still doesn’t know if the fire and graffiti are connected, or even if the spray-painted symbols should be constitute an actual hate crime.

“Obviously it’s upsetting, but it’s very hard to determine whether it was done by a bunch of kids who were playing around and be foolish, or whether it was done as a hate crime,” he says. “It shouldn’t be taken lightly, but it’s hard to say whether it’s a hate crime or a crime of opportunity.”

He says the Monkland Village is a safe, multi-cultural family neighbourhood, and that he has never experienced any hate crimes there before.

TORONTO: Randall Baran-Chong of HanVoice hoping to see Canadian sponsorship program for North Koreans

What’s Keeping Door Shut to North Koreans Seeking Haven in Canada?

Group says progress on sponsorships slowed since new immigration minister appointed.

By Jeremy J. Nuttall, 23 Sep 2014, TheTyee.ca

Randall Baran-Chong in Vancouver: His organization HanVoice seeks to match 100 North Koreans with welcoming Canadian families.

A group that advocates on behalf of North Korean refugees says it believes it is close to establishing a sponsorship program making it easier for those who originated from the oppressive country to come to Canada.

Toronto organization HanVoice said it has been in talks with the federal government — mainly the Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration — for some time and almost came to a firm proposal under former minister Jason Kenney.

The Tyee reported on Sept. 11 that Canada has not given a single North Korean refugee claimant status in Canada this year, compared to 230 in 2012.

The revelation came 10 months after current Immigration Minister Chris Alexander successfully challenged the granting of a North Korean woman and her child refugee status.

Since then, no North Korean has been granted refugee protection as the decision essentially shut the door to them, according to critics.

But Randall Baran-Chong of HanVoice said his group hopes to change the situation by establishing a program whereby Canadians can sponsor North Koreans for immigration.

He said progress has been slower since Alexander took over the immigration portfolio in July 2013 and he’s hoping with the opening of Parliament progress can be made. Continue reading

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