After years of catering to superstitious Chinese, Vancouver will stop skipping “unlucky” floor numbers

City goes back to ‘basic math’ in numbering buildings … for safety’s sake

No more skipping 4, 13, 14, 24 in Vancouver floor numbers
 The elevator panel at 1033 Marinaside in Yaletown skips No. 4, No. 13, No. 14, No. 24 and No. 34 floor buttons.

Photograph by: Gerry Kahrmann , Vancouver Sun

Vancouver has long accommodated the superstitious by allowing certain floor numbers, suite numbers and addresses to be hidden or not used at all.

Across the city, many buildings with more than 12 floors are missing the number 13, jumping right to 14. It stems from a time when people also believed it was bad luck to step on a crack or walk under a ladder.

More recently, Vancouver has increasingly found itself approving developments with many more missing floors, including 14. From the 4th to the 54th, any floor containing a 4 has vanished in an effort to cater to superstitious Chinese.

Condo towers marketed to Asian buyers often don’t even have suite numbers containing 4. Developers and real estate agents know it’s harder to sell suites on floors containing a 4 because the spoken word for the number sounds strikingly similar to the spoken word for “death” in Mandarin and Cantonese.

It can make for some odd situations, such as the 53-floor Burrard Place condo tower under construction at Hornby and Drake Streets being marketed as having a 60th floor. That’s because the developer not only knocked out all the floors with a 4, but took out 13 for good measure.

Now the city, increasingly worried about the potential for confusion among first responders, and the consequences of emergency providers misjudging floors, has called a halt.

Calgary Vietnamese Youth Association wants to bring into Canada as many Syrians as possible

Calgary’s young Vietnamese ‘pay it forward’ to Syrians


CVYA website

CVYA website

CALGARY — The Globe and Mail


Last updated 

The story they are watching unfold is one they know all too well.

Before millions of Syrians fled their country, the South Vietnamese journeyed in overburdened vessels teeming with humanity. Many came to North America and settled in several Canadian cities, including Calgary and Edmonton, where they were sponsored and encouraged to begin a new life.

More than 30 years later, Vietnamese Canadians are reaching out to Syrian refugees and offering what they need most – hope and a country to call home.

“We know [the Syrians] are more than refugees to Canada,” said Quang Trinh, chair of the Calgary Vietnamese Youth Association (CVYA). “They are nation-building people, and when you think of it that way, it’s easy to extend a hand.”

Tax lawyers say it is common for investors from China to pay no income tax in Canada

Foreign investors avoid taxes through Canadian real estate

A house at 3692 West 33rd Avenue is pictured in Vancouver on Oct. 3.

A house at 3692 West 33rd Avenue is pictured in Vancouver on Oct. 3.


Wealthy buyers taking advantage of loopholes by putting homes in the name of relatives or corporations


The Globe and Mail Last updated: 

A Beijing-based private equity manager who bought a $2.3-million home in the hot Vancouver real estate market said he did that while earning just $19,000 a year. He also wired nearly $2-million to his family in Canada during the same period.

Jing Sun is among several foreign investors who bought property in Canada in recent years, but kept the extent of their wealth out of view of the tax authorities and the courts, a Globe and Mail investigation has found.

The Globe’s findings come amid a controversy in Vancouver, where many blame foreign buyers for soaring house prices that have made a single-family home unattainable for some long-time residents. The Urban Development Institute will tackle the topic for the first time in a sold-out public forum on Wednesday in Vancouver.

RICHMOND: Chinese woman robbed by two men, one described as South Asian

No coincidence woman robbed after flat tire: VPD

Police believe her car was tampered with


SEPTEMBER 18, 2015 09:29 AM

Police are hoping CCTV footage will identify two men suspected of robbing a woman who withdrew $5,000 from a Richmond bank.

The woman, who is of Chinese ethnicity, took the cash from the bank, believed to be the TD Canada branch in Lansdowne Centre, on Monday, Sept. 14 at around 11 a.m.

However, at around 11:30 a.m., while en route to meet a friend in Vancouver, she noticed a tire on her car was flat and pulled into a parking lot near 57th Avenue and Oak Street in south Vancouver.

As she got out of the car, two men, one described as being south Asian, ran over and grabbed her purse containing the cash.

According to Const. Brian Montague, of the Vancouver Police Department (VPD), the victim does not believe she was targeted.

Her account of the incident, however, is leading the VPD to strongly suspect that she was singled out at the bank in Richmond and that her tire was tampered with by the men.

“It is possible this was random, but it would be too much of a coincidence that she got a flat tire shortly after withdrawing a large sum of money from the bank and then two men show up at her car within seconds and rob her,” added Montague.

Police are currently looking for video footage of the area around the bank and the mall at Lansdowne Centre.

Montague said police are, as yet, unable to release any more information about the suspects.

“We do get crimes of this nature from time to time; it’s always good to be aware of your surroundings, especially coming from the bank,” advised Montague.

“We suggest you keep your money and important identification items out of your purse and wallet. Losing your identification can cause a major disruption to your life.”

Anyone with information should contact the VPD at 604-717-3321 or Crimestoppers free and anonymously at 1-800-222-8477.

© 2015 Richmond News

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Unlicensed Richmond immigration consultant Xun “Sunny” Wang let hundreds into Canada illegally

Unlicensed Richmond immigration consultant let hundreds into Canada illegally: Crown


SEPTEMBER 17, 2015 05:26 PM

CBSA immigration fraud

Chinese passports were seized by Canadian Border Services Agency after a “significant” fraud scheme was uncovered earlier this year

‘Many, many hundreds” of immigrants obtained Canadian citizenship or permanent residence with the help of an unlicensed immigration consultant in Richmond who made millions altering passports, a court was told Wednesday.

Xun “Sunny” Wang appeared at a sentencing hearing in provincial court in Vancouver after pleading guilty to eight charges in connection with his immigration businesses.

Federal Crown counsel Bruce Harper said “definitely many, many hundreds” and possibly “well over 1,000” of Wang’s clients obtained Canadian citizenship or permanent resident status through Wang’s fraudulent businesses.

“There are certainly a great number of individuals whose status in Canada, whether permanent residence or citizenship, is now in question,” Harper said.

Wang’s businesses served more than 1,000 customers between 2006 and 2013, charging more than $10 million for services, court heard.

Along with six counts under the Criminal Code and the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, Wang has pleaded guilty to two counts under the Income Tax Act, including failing to report $2,722,305 of taxable income from 2007 to 2012.

And, despite the millions earned by his companies, court heard, Wang also claimed several thousand dollars of low-income tax benefits between 2008 and 2013, which Harper compared to robbing a bank, and then stealing the charitable donation can on the way out.

“It adds insult to injury,” Harper said.

Crown is seeking a sentence of seven and a half years.

Tragedy of ‘golden’ daughter’s fall resonates with Asian immigrants

Straight A student to murderer: Tragedy of ‘golden’ daughter’s fall resonates with Asian immigrants

 | July 27, 2015 | Last Updated: Jul 27 4:54 PM ET
More from Washington Post

Jennifer Pan's  trial, for plotting with hit men to kill her parents, ended in January, and she's serving a long sentence. But the full story of this troubled young woman is just now being told as a complete and powerful narrative by someone who knew her.

For a while, Tragedy of ‘golden’ daughter’s fall resonates with Asian immigrants’s parents regarded her as their “golden” child.

The young Canadian woman, who lived in the city of Markham just north of Toronto, was a straight A student at a Catholic school who won scholarships and early acceptance to college. True to her father’s wishes, she graduated from the University of Toronto’s prestigious pharmacology program and went on to work at a blood-testing lab at SickKids hospital.

Pan’s accomplishments used to make her mother and father, Bich Ha and Huei Hann Pan, brim with pride. After all, they had arrived in Toronto as refugees from Vietnam, working as labourers for an auto parts manufacturer so their two kids could have the bright future that they couldn’t attain for themselves.

But in Pan’s case, that perfect fate was all an elaborate lie. She failed to graduate from high school, let alone the University of Toronto, as she had told her parents. Her trial, for plotting with hit men to kill her parents, ended in January, and she’s serving a long sentence. But the full story of this troubled young woman is just now being told as a complete and powerful narrative by someone who knew her.

A social butterfly with an easy, high-pitched laugh, she mixed with guys, girls, Asians, Caucasians, jocks, nerds, people deep into the arts

In a story published in Toronto Life magazine last week, reporter Karen Ho detailed the intricate web of deception that her high school classmate at Mary Ward Catholic Secondary School in north Scarborough spun to prevent her parents from discovering the unimaginable: that their golden child was, in fact, failing. Using court documents and interviews, Ho pieced together Pan’s descent from a precocious elementary schooler to a chronic liar who forged report cards, scholarship letters and university transcripts — all to preserve an image of perfection. The headline: “Jennifer Pan’s Revenge: the inside story of a golden child, the killers she hired, and the parents she wanted dead.”