Canadians might need visas for 26 European countries as EU pushes Canada to lift visa requirement on travellers from Romania and Bulgaria

Canada, European Union, locked in visa spat

Canadians might need visas for 26 European countries as EU pushes Canada to lift visa requirement on travellers from Romania and Bulgaria

Canadian Immigration Minister John McCallum was warned in January by a Romanian member of the European Parliament that Canada's insistence on visas for visitors from Romania and Bulgaria could cause a nasty spat.ADRIAN WYLD / THE CANADIAN PRESS

Romania

Canadian Immigration Minister John McCallum was warned in January by a Romanian member of the European Parliament that Canada’s insistence on visas for visitors from Romania and Bulgaria could cause a nasty spat.

OTTAWA — Canada and the European Union are racing towards a Tuesday deadline to avoid triggering a process that could result in Canadian travellers having to obtain a visa to travel to 26 European countries.

It is part of an ongoing dispute in which the EU has pushed Canada to lift its requirement on travellers from its member countries, Romania and Bulgaria.

The issue has raised concerns that the dispute could adversely affect the mammoth Canada-EU free trade deal, which still has yet to be ratified.

The 28-member bloc says Canada’s visa violates the spirit of reciprocity, but the Immigration Department disagrees.

Representatives from Canada, the EU, and Bulgaria and Romania have met four times since then — including a session this past Wednesday — but no progress has been made, said one source familiar with the efforts but not authorized to discuss them publicly.

Bulgaria

Tuesday’s deadline raises the possibility of igniting a nasty public spat in a year when Canada and the EU are celebrating 40 years of relations and hoping to finally ratify their landmark free trade deal.

A Romanian member of the European Parliament raised that possibility in January in an open letter to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Immigration Minister John McCallum and International Trade Minister Chrystia Freeland.

European lawmaker Sorin Moisa wrote that removing visas for Romanians and Bulgarians “would not bring any risks for Canada, would remove some of the real political risks to CETA’s adoption, and would spare both the EU and Canada an embarrassing legal and political row.”

The EU’s embassy in Ottawa declined comment.

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Brad Salzberg: Liberal-Socialism And The Erosion Of Christian Canada

Liberal-Socialism And The Erosion Of Christian Canada

writer: Brad Salzberg, March 2016

http://capforcanada.com

Christian Cross Special Design Pin with Canada Flag

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In the world of politics, as with many situations in life, making promises often leads to unexpected results. Nowhere is this more apparent than when considering the post-election behaviour of Canada’s ruling Liberal government.

The examples are many— a pronouncement of a 10 billion dollar federal deficit, which turned out to be triple that amount.  An increase in the Syrian refugee quota from the original 25,000 to 55,000—a quantity the majority of Canadians oppose— are two of the most prominent.

In fairness, broken promises are not exclusive to our Liberal government. What is exclusive to the Liberals, however, is the extent to which they disregard public opinion. Of course, there is a good reason for this. The Canadian public—at least those of us born and raised in Canada— are all but meaningless to our ruling Liberal government.

Province proclaims 2016 the year of Saskatchewan Ukrainians

Province proclaims 2016 the year of Saskatchewan Ukrainians

It’s been 125 years since the first arrival of Ukrainian immigrants

CBC News Posted: Jan 05, 2016 11:20 AM CT Last Updated: Jan 05, 2016 11:27 AM CT

Thirteen per cent of people in Saskatchewan can trace part or all of their ancestry to Ukraine. 2016 is the year of Saskatchewan Ukrainians.

Thirteen per cent of people in Saskatchewan can trace part or all of their ancestry to Ukraine. 2016 is the year of Saskatchewan Ukrainians. (Don Somers/CBC)

This is the year of Saskatchewan Ukrainians.

“Settlers from Ukraine helped build our province.”– Premier Brad Wall

Premier Brad Wall has announced that 2016 will be the year of Saskatchewan immigrants. The province is celebrating the 125th anniversary of the first wave of Ukrainian immigrants to Canada.

“Ukrainian culture and traditions are deeply embedded in the Saskatchewan mosaic,” Wall said in a news release. “Settlers from Ukraine helped build our province, bringing to their new home what our motto proudly proclaims: ‘From Many Peoples, Strength.’ Those traditions manifest themselves today in countless community celebrations, in educational programs, and in the longstanding relationship Saskatchewan enjoys with Ukraine.”

Ukrainians still arriving

According to the provincial government, more than 13 per cent of Saskatchewan residents can trace part or all of their ancestry to Ukraine. Immigration from Ukraine continues today, with the country ranking fourth on the list of where newcomers arrive from.

The proclamation serves as a launch for anniversary celebrations that will happen across the province and the rest of the country.

Ukrainians will also celebrate Christmas this week. Ukrainians and Orthodox Christians celebrate Christmas on January the 7th.

Polish family forced to leave Canada because of mistake made by immigration Canada

Polish couple say temporary visas revoked without warning, forced back to Europe

Young family says federal government gave no warning before revoking resident visas

CBC News Posted: Feb 19, 2016 8:06 PM NT Last Updated: Feb 19, 2016 8:06 PM NT

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Polish couple forced back to Europe after visa mistake 1:49
A couple from Poland say they’re being forced to leave Newfoundland and Labrador — the only home their five-year-old daughter has ever known — all because of mismanaged forms and miscommunication.

According to Anna Tyszkiwicz and Krzysztof Kubera, the federal government waited until their temporary resident visas expired before telling them about a crucial piece of missing paperwork. 

Losing that status meant the pair also lost work permits and medical coverage — a problem, considering their second child is due in June.Anna Tyszkiwicz and Krzysztof Kubra daughter

“We’ve got friends already from Gander to here. [Our daughter’s] life is here. She doesn’t remember any other friends than from here,” Kubera told CBC News.

 

Tyszkiwicz and Kubra say their five-year-old daughter, Amelia, was registered to start kindergarten in St. John’s in September. (CBC)

The couple immigrated to Gander two-and-a-half years ago. They later relocated to St. John’s.

Tyszkiwicz worked as a homecare worker, while Krys was employed as a cook. Their daughter, Amelia, was registered to start kindergarten at Macdonald Drive Elementary in September.

Back in October, the couple filed paperwork to extend their work permits in the hopes of eventually applying for permanent residency.

‘In just one day everything is gone. It shouldn’t be like that.’– Anna Tyszkiwicz

But three months later, the family received an email from Citizenship and Immigration Canada saying that one additional form was required from each of their employers. 

“We also wish to advise you that your temporary resident status expired on January 18, 2016,” reads the statement, dated that same day.

Hungarian Roma family hiding in Hungary can return to Canada

Canada’s door reopened to deported Roma family

After years of living in hiding on two continents, the Pusuma family has been thrown a lifeline by the Trudeau government, which has agreed to allow them to return to Canada on humanitarian and compassionate grounds.

Jozsef Pusuma, his wife, Timea Daroczi, and their daughter Viktoria (Lulu) have received word from the Trudeau government that they can finally call Canada home. The family, whown in 2014, had previously sought sanctuary in a Toronto church for three years before returning to Hungary after losing their asylum claim.

NICHOLAS KEUNG / TORONTO STAR FILE PHOTO

Jozsef Pusuma, his wife, Timea Daroczi, and their daughter Viktoria (Lulu) have received word from the Trudeau government that they can finally call Canada home. The family, whown in 2014, had previously sought sanctuary in a Toronto church for three years before returning to Hungary after losing their asylum claim.

Canada’s door has reopened for a Roma family who were forced to leave the country after they lost their asylum claim amid a long battle to bring their disgraced former lawyer to justice.

After years of living in hiding on two continents — including three years in a Toronto church — Jozsef Pusuma, his wife, Timea Daroczi, and their daughter Viktoria (Lulu) have received word from the Trudeau government that they can finally call Canada home.

The Pusumas left Canada in December 2014 before Toronto lawyer Viktor Hohots admitted to a Law Society Tribunal to professional misconduct in relation to 17 complaints from Roma refugee claimants.

Hohots was suspended from practice for five months and barred from practising refugee law for two years.

The Pusumas had spent three years in sanctuary in a Toronto church and were clinging to the slim hope Canada would allow them to return on humanitarian and compassionate grounds for the wrong done by their former lawyer. They have been in hiding in Hungary ever since.

(…)

University of Ottawa yoga class replaces white teacher with teacher of South Indian descent

University of Ottawa yoga class resumes with new teacher

A controversial yoga class at the University of Ottawa is back on — with a teacher of Indian background, who is wondering if she was hired because of her race.

Jennifer Scharf used to teach a free yoga class at the University of Ottawa before it was cancelled in late 2015 due to concerns about cultural "oppression."

Jennifer Scharf used to teach a free yoga class at the University of Ottawa before it was cancelled in late 2015 due to concerns about cultural “oppression.”

COURTESY JENNIFER SCHARF

Jennifer Scharf used to teach a free yoga class at the University of Ottawa before it was cancelled in late 2015 due to concerns about cultural “oppression.”

Little more than two months ago, many were outraged to hear that a yoga class at the University of Ottawa was cancelled. The problem wasn’t a lack of interest, the class’s teacher said. It was concerns that yoga was taken from India, a culture that “experienced oppression, cultural genocide and diasporas due to colonialism and western supremacy,” according to the group that once sponsored it.

For those enraged about political correctness and trigger warnings — and worried about free speech — on many university campuses, this appeared to be Exhibit A demonstrating that the youth of North America have gone crazy.

“Just take a semester at UOttawa, and you’ll have 100s of useless controversies thrown in your face,” one commenter wrote on the Facebook page of the campus group that cancelled the class. “Oh yeah, and your tuition money pays for that.”

Now, it appears the controversial class is back on — with a teacher of Indian background, who is wondering if she was hired because of her race.

“Nothing was brought to my attention to teach in a different way or do something differently than the other instructor because none of that was really mentioned to me,” Priya Shah, the new teacher, told the CBC.