BRADFORD, ON: Simcoe Clinicas De Salud Para Trabajadores Agricolas Migratorios created to serve more than 4,000 migrant farm workers

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Dr. Christopher Keefer, from left, Eustace Orleans-Lindsay, pharmacist at the Simcoe Superstore; McMaster University health anthropology graduate student Stephanie Mayell; Isabel Chilean and Lorena Acuna, both translators; and the clinic's primary care assistant Tricia Gutierrez.

SUPPLIED PHOTO

Dr. Christopher Keefer, from left, Eustace Orleans-Lindsay, pharmacist at the Simcoe Superstore; McMaster University health anthropology graduate student Stephanie Mayell; Isabel Chilean and Lorena Acuna, both translators; and the clinic’s primary care assistant Tricia Gutierrez.

By:  Immigration reporter, Published on Sun Dec 14 2014

Migrant farm workers have been lining up at Simcoe Town Centre every Thursday or Friday evening since May for a free shuttle bus to the Real Canadian Superstore three kilometres away.

Their focus isn’t groceries so much as a unique health office, Clinicas De Salud Para Trabajadores Agricolas Migratorios, or Agricultural Seasonal Worker Clinic, housed in the food chain’s extra space. The clinic was created to serve the more than 4,000 migrant farm workers toiling at farms and greenhouses in the region south of Brantford.

Designed to eliminate some of the systemic barriers migrant workers face in getting basic health care, the pilot project has been a resounding success — reducing visits by such workers to the Norfolk General Hospital by 80 per cent.

KELOWNA: Mexican women sort and pack cherries for the Chinese market

Seasonal jobs at Kelowna plant highly sought-after by Mexican mothers

WENDY STUECK

LIBRES, MEXICO — The Globe and Mail

Published 

Last updated 

When Maria Carmona greets her mother, they embrace, hands clasped and foreheads touching.

They have been through this ritual before. For the past five years, Ms. Carmona, 51, has left her home in Libres – west of Mexico City, in the province of Puebla – to work at a cherry-packing plant near Kelowna, saying goodbye each time to her mother and children.

But the departures have not grown easier and the reunions are bittersweet, shadowed by the older woman’s failing health.

Ms. Carmona’s mother, Maria Lopez – who has had 20 children, at least three of whom have gone to work in Canadian fields, packing plants or greenhouses – wasn’t happy when she first heard of her daughter’s plans to go to British Columbia. She worried about her daughter’s safety and how her grandchildren would fare. Now, she is resigned.

MONTREAL: Haitians and Latinos involved in early morning St-Michel shooting

Police find last suspect in early morning St-Michel shooting

Published on: Last Updated: 

Pie IX Blvd. has reopened to traffic following an overnight investigation into an exchange of gunfire between police and five suspect shortly after 1 a.m. in Montreal’s St-Michel borough.

Police had been looking for a man after being called to an area of Montreal’s St-Michel borough after shots were heard near Pie IX Blvd and 47th avenue shortly after 1 a.m.

According to SPVM spokesman Simon Delorme, police found a vehicle occupied by five men when they arrived on the scene, but the men fled by foot.

While chasing the suspects, a shot was fired towards the officers and police responded with more shots, Delorme said.

Four of the suspects were arrested shortly after the exchange, but one remained on the run until shortly before 8 a.m.

No one was injured during this operation.

Authorities were able to catch the last suspect with the help of the Sûreté du Québec’s helicopters and the members of the tactical team.

Police nabbed him in the industrial sector of St-Michel after combing through a security perimeter between Pie IX Blvd., Des Grandes Prairies Blvd., the Miron quarry and Robert Blvd.

Delorme said there is reason to believe the men, who are all between 25 and 29 years old, are involved in street gangs.

The investigation continues in the industrial park as authorities look for evidence in the case.

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http://fr.canoe.ca/infos/societe/archives/2014/11/20141102-040706.html

Les suspects d’origine latino-américaine et haïtienne sont vraisemblablement liés aux gangs de rue, selon la police.

http://journalmetro.com/actualites/montreal/586830/coups-de-feu-vers-des-policiers-suspect-arrete/

 

Domestic violence acceptable reason to keep Mexican woman in Canada

Mexican woman in Montreal facing deportation to remain in Canada

CBCCBC – Sun, 24 Aug, 2014

(…)

Citizenship and Immigration Canada has stayed Sheila Sedinger Ayala’s removal order.

“It feels amazing,” Sedinger Ayala told CBC news. “Now I can concentrate on celebrating my daughter’s birthday which is this Saturday, the day I was going to be deported.”

Sedinger Ayala, 27, was initially ordered to be deported back to Mexico after her refugee claim sponsor  — her husband — was convicted of a criminal offence.

Her two Canadian-born children would  have stayed behind in Canada if the deportation went ahead.

(…)

The decision comes one day after an immigrant rights group hosted a news conference for Sedinger Ayala on Sunday.

With her fiancé by her side, Sedinger Ayala sobbed while she explained what had happened to her and why she should be granted temporary residency to allow her to stay in Canada while she sorts out her affairs.

Sedinger Ayala said she moved to Montreal from Mexico City in 2005, fleeing from a violent ex-boyfriend.

She had one child within a year of arriving in Canada — a product of gang rape while in Mexico, said Sedinger Ayala’s lawyer Angela Potvin.

She later met and married a man in Montreal with whom she had another child. She said he sponsored her bid for permanent residency and in 2008, the federal and provincial governments accepted her sponsorship application.

However, Potvin said the sponsor was found guilty of physical assault during the course of Sedinger Ayala’s sponsorship application, which in turn made him ineligible to sponsor her. She said the conviction cancelled her permanent residency bid.

TORONTO: Entire Cuban family gets sponsored, CIC expected to take measures

Wife fights to keep sponsored hubby’s family out of Canada

michele-mandel

BY  ,TORONTO SUN

FIRST POSTED: 

TORONTO — Deborah Parsons thought she had secured love and a happy future when she sponsored her new Cuban husband to Canada nine years ago.

Instead, she brought home violence, debt and a now-convicted domestic abuser intent on bringing the rest of his family to his new country. And despite her repeated warnings to the immigration department about her husband’s past since coming to Canada, they won’t tell her what they are doing to ensure members of his family are not allowed to come here as well.

“Now that the veil of control and abuse has lifted, my hindsight has become quite clear,” Parsons, 45, wrote in a letter to Citizenship and Immigration Minister Chris Alexander. “I was only used for sponsorship, then required to be the bread winner, a maid, a chef, a laundress, a secretary, an employment agency and a charity organization.”

MONTREAL: 78-old Julia Hidalgo-Aguilera wants to keep her to-be-deported son in Canada as primary caregiver

Ailing Montreal mother pleads for delay in son’s deportation

Mother and son plead for immigration leniencyHector Reyes-Hidalgo came to Canada four years ago to care for his ailing mother, Julia Hidalgo-Aguilera, who has ALS. But Hector is facing deportation to his native Chile if Immigration Canada doesn’t grant him a reprieve.
CTV Montreal
Published Sunday, July 27, 2014 6:28PM EDT
Last Updated Sunday, July 27, 2014 6:57PM EDT

It’s a desperate plea to Immigration Canada from a woman dying of ALS and her son.

Julia Hidalgo-Aguilera, 78, has lost most of the use of her legs and says her arms are growing weaker.

Her son Hector Reyes-Hidalgo came from Chile four years ago to care for her.

He’s her only family member in Canada and her primary caregiver, but he is set to be deported back to his home country Tuesday.

They’re making an appeal on compassionate grounds to delay his deportation next week.

Even the most basic tasks are almost impossible for Hidalgo-Aguilera — she has difficulty swallowing, moving and sometimes breathing.

Immigration Canada accepted a request for Hidalgo-Aguilera to sponsor her son’s immigration, but Reyes-Hidalgo was rejected in his bid to obtain a Quebec Selection Certificate, which he needs if he wants to live in Quebec.

So next week, he faces deportation.

“I’m thinking of my mother more than of me. I’m hoping for a solution soon,” he said.

Reyes-Hidalgo can contest Immigration Quebec’s decision in October, but without a stay of deportation from Immigration Canada, he won’t have a chance to plead his case.

That could prove to be devastating for his mother physically, emotionally and financially.

“I help pay the rent and pay a lot of things to maintain the house,” he said.

Letters of support have been written by doctors and politicians, including the leader of the official opposition Thomas Mulcair.

(…)

Read more: http://montreal.ctvnews.ca/ailing-montreal-mother-pleads-for-delay-in-son-s-deportation-1.1934471#ixzz38izfKlKW

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http://www.cpa.ca/cpasite/userfiles/documents/practice_page/burden_neuro_diseases_en.pdf

http://www.als.ca/sites/default/files/files/HealthcareProviders/Guide%20to%20ALS%20Patient%20Care.pdf

http://www.neurology.org/cgi/content/meeting_abstract/80/1_MeetingAbstracts/P07.065