Colombian activist Luis Alberto Mata won bid for permanent residence after 12-year delay


Torstar News Service
Human rights advocate Luis Alberto Mata, centre, with wife Diana and son Jacobo, was delighted to learn Friday that his 12-year struggle to attain permanent residence in Canada is finally coming to an end.

After a 12-year delay, an accepted refugee from Colombia has won a bittersweet battle against Ottawa to gain permanent resident status.

Luis Alberto Mata, who was granted asylum in Canada in 2003, was notified Friday by the federal justice department that he will receive his permanent resident visa by the end of the month.

“I’m really happy and grateful that the Department of Justice did something that I’d deserved for many years,” said the Toronto man, who has lived in limbo as a “protected person” because immigration officials would not render a decision on his permanent residence application all these years.

“I was sad and didn’t see any hope in my life. Now I can finally get the security that I need to establish myself in Canada and move forward.”

Mata and his supporters had been kept in the dark about what caused the inaction by immigration officials, but believed it was a result of the human rights activist being mislabeled as a “guerrilla sympathizer and collaborator” in propaganda by previous Colombia authorities.

Ecuadorian frustrated with Yukon Nominee Program

‘There’s no way to find out who’s hiring and who’s not,’ says Juan Carlos Escobar Hernandez

By Karen McColl, CBC News Posted: Apr 27, 2015 8:24 AM CT Last Updated: Apr 27, 2015 12:54 PM CT

Juan Carlos Escobar Hernandez flew to Whitehorse from Edmonton earlier this month with the hope of being hired into the Yukon Nominee Program, but he says so far he hasn't had much success.Juan Carlos Escobar Hernandez flew to Whitehorse from Edmonton earlier this month with the hope of being hired into the Yukon Nominee Program, but he says so far he hasn’t had much success. (Karen McColl)

 

An Ecuadorian man who came to the Yukon in a final attempt to attain permanent residency — and whose work permit is about to run out — says he’s frustrated by a lack of information available to foreign workers.

Juan Carlos Escobar Hernandez, 30, flew to Whitehorse from Edmonton earlier this month with the hope of being hired into the Yukon Nominee Program, which offers a pathway to citizenship. So far, he says, he hasn’t had much success.

“I think I applied to 90 per cent of the hotels in Whitehorse. I’ve applied to a few restaurants, a few stores,” he said 10 days after his arrival.

He said one company offered to hire him but didn’t want to have to go through the nominee program.

Escobar Hernandez, who has a diploma in tourism from Ontario’s Fanshawe College, said it’s frustrating not knowing what businesses are part of the nominee program.

“You hear from other foreigners to go to Canadian Tire or to go to different hotels, but it’s not advertised. There’s no way to find out who’s hiring and who’s not. Especially for the nominee program.”

MISSISSAUGA: Marilyn Ely Reid facing deportation to Venezuela

Jan 29, 2015 |

‘Nurse’ who used caulking gun to inject silicone into women’s buttocks facing deportation

Marilyn Ely Reid

Marilyn Ely Reid, 48, originally from Venezuela, pleaded guilty to eight counts of aggravated assault.

Mississauga News

MISSISSAUGA — A Newmarket woman who injected silicone into the buttocks of several Peel women using a syringe and a caulking gun, causing many of them to develop severe infections and disfigurement, is facing 10 years in jail and deportation after pleading guilty to eight counts of aggravated assault.

Marilyn Ely Reid, 48, originally from Venezuela, pleaded guilty earlier this month. She was arrested in November 2012 after a 28-year-old Brampton woman fell ill after receiving alleged Botox injections. Police said the woman underwent surgery to have the substance removed. Others experienced disfigurement and developed serious infections, court heard.

A Mississauga woman — who cannot be identified along with the other victims due to a publication ban — is still unable to sit down, defence lawyer Calvin Barry said.

Reid operated a website advertising “buttock, lip and muscle augmentations” as well as Botox, Crown prosecutor Allison MacPherson told the court.

Reid, who is not licensed as a nurse or a doctor in Ontario, assured her customers she had medical training, telling some she was a nurse who trained in Europe or South America, and others that she had been a doctor or plastic surgeon in Spain.

BRADFORD, ON: Simcoe Clinicas De Salud Para Trabajadores Agricolas Migratorios created to serve more than 4,000 migrant farm workers

  • Share on Facebook
  • Reddit this!
Dr. Christopher Keefer, from left, Eustace Orleans-Lindsay, pharmacist at the Simcoe Superstore; McMaster University health anthropology graduate student Stephanie Mayell; Isabel Chilean and Lorena Acuna, both translators; and the clinic's primary care assistant Tricia Gutierrez.

SUPPLIED PHOTO

Dr. Christopher Keefer, from left, Eustace Orleans-Lindsay, pharmacist at the Simcoe Superstore; McMaster University health anthropology graduate student Stephanie Mayell; Isabel Chilean and Lorena Acuna, both translators; and the clinic’s primary care assistant Tricia Gutierrez.

By:  Immigration reporter, Published on Sun Dec 14 2014

Migrant farm workers have been lining up at Simcoe Town Centre every Thursday or Friday evening since May for a free shuttle bus to the Real Canadian Superstore three kilometres away.

Their focus isn’t groceries so much as a unique health office, Clinicas De Salud Para Trabajadores Agricolas Migratorios, or Agricultural Seasonal Worker Clinic, housed in the food chain’s extra space. The clinic was created to serve the more than 4,000 migrant farm workers toiling at farms and greenhouses in the region south of Brantford.

Designed to eliminate some of the systemic barriers migrant workers face in getting basic health care, the pilot project has been a resounding success — reducing visits by such workers to the Norfolk General Hospital by 80 per cent.

KELOWNA: Mexican women sort and pack cherries for the Chinese market

Seasonal jobs at Kelowna plant highly sought-after by Mexican mothers

WENDY STUECK

LIBRES, MEXICO — The Globe and Mail

Published 

Last updated 

When Maria Carmona greets her mother, they embrace, hands clasped and foreheads touching.

They have been through this ritual before. For the past five years, Ms. Carmona, 51, has left her home in Libres – west of Mexico City, in the province of Puebla – to work at a cherry-packing plant near Kelowna, saying goodbye each time to her mother and children.

But the departures have not grown easier and the reunions are bittersweet, shadowed by the older woman’s failing health.

Ms. Carmona’s mother, Maria Lopez – who has had 20 children, at least three of whom have gone to work in Canadian fields, packing plants or greenhouses – wasn’t happy when she first heard of her daughter’s plans to go to British Columbia. She worried about her daughter’s safety and how her grandchildren would fare. Now, she is resigned.

MONTREAL: Haitians and Latinos involved in early morning St-Michel shooting

Police find last suspect in early morning St-Michel shooting

Published on: Last Updated: 

Pie IX Blvd. has reopened to traffic following an overnight investigation into an exchange of gunfire between police and five suspect shortly after 1 a.m. in Montreal’s St-Michel borough.

Police had been looking for a man after being called to an area of Montreal’s St-Michel borough after shots were heard near Pie IX Blvd and 47th avenue shortly after 1 a.m.

According to SPVM spokesman Simon Delorme, police found a vehicle occupied by five men when they arrived on the scene, but the men fled by foot.

While chasing the suspects, a shot was fired towards the officers and police responded with more shots, Delorme said.

Four of the suspects were arrested shortly after the exchange, but one remained on the run until shortly before 8 a.m.

No one was injured during this operation.

Authorities were able to catch the last suspect with the help of the Sûreté du Québec’s helicopters and the members of the tactical team.

Police nabbed him in the industrial sector of St-Michel after combing through a security perimeter between Pie IX Blvd., Des Grandes Prairies Blvd., the Miron quarry and Robert Blvd.

Delorme said there is reason to believe the men, who are all between 25 and 29 years old, are involved in street gangs.

The investigation continues in the industrial park as authorities look for evidence in the case.

_________

http://fr.canoe.ca/infos/societe/archives/2014/11/20141102-040706.html

Les suspects d’origine latino-américaine et haïtienne sont vraisemblablement liés aux gangs de rue, selon la police.

http://journalmetro.com/actualites/montreal/586830/coups-de-feu-vers-des-policiers-suspect-arrete/