MONTREAL: 10 teens arrested while trying to leave Canada to join ISIS

 

A file image uploaded on June 14, 2014 on the jihadist website Welayat Salahuddin allegedly shows militants of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) executing dozens of captured Iraqi security forces members at an unknown location in the Salaheddin province (AFP Photo / HO)

Quebec to table anti-radicalization bill after 10 teens arrested at Trudeau airport

Parent’s tip led to arrests of 10 Quebec teens allegedly seeking to join jihadists

CBC News Posted: May 20, 2015 5:14 PM ET Last Updated: May 20, 2015 9:52 PM ET

 10 teens arrested on suspicion of joining jihad 2:34
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What parents can do to save their children from religious extremism 7:54

The Quebec government says it will soon table legislation designed to fight the radicalization of the province’s youth in the wake of 10 arrests over the weekend.

Police believe the teens, who were arrested but not charged, were trying to leave Canada to join jihadists fighting in Turkey and Syria.

Four of the 10 teens arrested were students at Montreal CEGEP Collège de Maisonneuve.

Widow, ex-soldier move for final judgment on $134M suit against Omar Khadr

Widow, ex-soldier move for final judgment on $134M suit against Omar Khadr

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BY COLIN PERKEL, THE CANADIAN PRESS ON MAY 17, 2015.
Omar Khadr walks out the front door of his lawyer Dennis Edney's home to speak the media in Edmonton, Thursday, May 7, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan DenetteOmar Khadr walks out the front door of his lawyer Dennis Edney’s home to speak the media in Edmonton, Thursday, May 7, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

TORONTO – The widow of an American special forces soldier killed in Afghanistan and another soldier partially blinded by a hand grenade have moved to finalize a default civil-suit judgment against former Guantanamo Bay prisoner Omar Khadr.

Court documents filed in Utah April 24, the day an Alberta court granted Khadr bail, show the plaintiffs are asking the courts to award them triple damages for a total of US$134.1 million.

Lawyer Laura Tanner, who represents Tabitha Speer and Layne Morris, said in an interview she would be filing a final order for the federal judge to review and sign within days.

Once that happens – final word on damages would be up to the judge – the families can move to have the judgment enforced against Khadr, 28, in a Canadian court.

(…)

Sociology professor Abdie Kazemipur suggests that creating same-faith ghettoes prevents Muslims from adapting to Canada

Multiculturalism helping Muslims adapt to Canada

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 BY MABELL, DAVE ON MAY 8, 2015.

LETHBRIDGE HERALD

dmabell@lethbridgeherald.com

Canadians’ belief in multiculturalism is helping Muslim immigrants and others adapt to their new country.

But the current federal government isn’t providing much support for that ideal, a Lethbridge audience was told Thursday. And there’s danger that racist and anti-Muslim attitudes from Europe may spread to this nation.

To increase understanding, sociology professor Abdie Kazemipur suggested, the onus is on Muslims as well as their non-Muslim neighbours to learn about each other. Creating same-faith ghettoes, he told the Southern Alberta Council on Public Affairs, Thursday, prevents that from happening.

“Both Muslims and non-Muslims have responsibilities,” he said. “We need a two-way process.”

Muslim Brotherhood gripping sections of Canada’s diverse Muslim community, says U.S. security expert

Beware of the Muslim Brotherhood, expert warns

Published on: May 16, 2015
Last Updated: May 16, 2015 6:36 AM EDT

Ihsaan Gardee, Executive Director of the Canadian Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR-CAN) stresses his group has no ties with the Muslim Brotherhood.

Sean Kilpatrick / THE CANADIAN PRESS

Authorities should be concerned about the unseen hand of the Muslim Brotherhood gripping sections of Canada’s diverse Muslim community, says a U.S. security expert.

The movement has planted its revivalist interpretation of Islam, political ideology and activism among some Muslims here and sees itself as a minder and broker between them and the rest of society, Lorenzo Vidino, who specializes in Islamism and political violence, told the Senate’s national security committee recently.

“They basically aim to be the gatekeepers to Muslim communities, that whenever politicians, governments or the media try to get the Muslim voice, if there were such a thing, they would go through them, sort of the self‑appointed leaders of Muslim communities,” he said.

Vidino is director of the program on extremism at George Washington University and author of The New Muslim Brotherhood in the West (Columbia University Press, 2010). He sees no direct links to terrorism among the group’s western supporters. In fact, some work to prevent violent radicalization, he said.

“It would be an analytical mistake to lump them, as some do, with al-Qaida or ISIL. These are not organizations that plan attacks in the West, and actually in many cases they do condemn them.”

The problem is more indirect, Vidino said. “Generally speaking, the movement has not abandoned violence as a tool to advance its agenda.” Tactically, it doesn’t pursue violence, “but it’s not heartfelt,” he said.

“They have this narrative where they lump together foreign policy issues with issues like cartoons and so on as part of a big narrative that proves this point that the West hates Muslims and Islam. It’s that mainstreaming of this narrative which is very much the staircase to violent radicalization and the brotherhood does mainstream that. It provides somewhat of a fertile environment.

“That kind of narrative in the mind a 16- or 18-year-old is extremely dangerous, because violence is justified when Muslims are under attack. If it’s OK in Gaza and Afghanistan, why is it not OK in the West, where you’re also telling me that Islam is under attack?”

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The brotherhood is a banned terrorist organization in some Middle East and other countries, notably Egypt, where the movement was born. But it has different profile in the West.

To start, there is no group calling itself the “Muslim Brotherhood” in North America. Instead, a few hundred sophisticated, politically savvy and well-funded supporters in Canada have over the past 50 years created vocal and visible organizations that represent a very small part of the Muslim community. They exert a disproportional influence over mosques, schools and spaces where Muslims come together, said Vidino.

While they don’t take orders from any Arab capital, they “are part of an informal network where you have strong links based on personal and financial connections, and at the end of the day what matters the most: ideology. They all embrace a certain world view.”

Groups sometimes go to great lengths to sever or hide such ties, Vidino told the committee. He said they include the Muslim Association of Canada and what used to be called CAIR-CAN, now the National Council of Canadian Muslims.

Another group he identified is The International Relief Fund for the Afflicted and Needy – Canada, IRFAN. Its charitable status was revoked after the government alleged the organization sent almost $15 million to groups affiliated with the Palestinian terror outfit Hamas between 2005 and 2009. IRFAN has since been listed as a banned terrorist organization in Canada.

Ihsaan Gardee, executive director of the NCCM, said Vidino is misinformed.

“The NCCM is an independent, non-partisan and non-profit grassroots Canadian civil liberties and advocacy organization with a public track record spanning 15 years,” said Gardee. “The NCCM is not a religious group and does not and has never had any affiliations, links, ideological or of any other kind, with the Muslim Brotherhood or any other overseas group.”

The Muslim Association of Canada did not respond to a request for comment. But its website traces its roots to the teachings of Egyptian Hassan al-Banna, who founded the brotherhood in 1928 to revive and integrate traditional Islamic teaching and practices, such as sharia law, with modern society.

Edmonton welcomes Syrian refugees

‘I feel like I have come back to life again’

 BY ALEXANDRA ZABJEK, EDMONTON JOURNAL MAY 14, 2015
  
Edmonton offers hope to Syrian refugees

Syrian refugee Hala Aldajani and her family received a warm welcome at Edmonton International Airport in Edmonton on May 12, 2015.

Photograph by: Bruce Edwards , Edmonton Journal

EDMONTON – Tears, kisses and embraces greeted a Syrian family in the arrivals area at Edmonton International Airport.

The scene evoked the tenderness and joy of a family reunion, but not everyone gathered knew Mohamed Al Masalmi, his wife Hala Al Dajani or their five children. Many were strangers, Christian and Muslim, who had simply come to welcome them Tuesday night to their new lives in Canada.

The family had arrived from Syria, by way of neighbouring Arab countries and the work of two local groups that forged a partnership to ensure refugees from one of the world’s biggest humanitarian disasters can make a home in Edmonton.

“I feel like I have come back to life again,” Al Masalmi said through a translator, while members of the Islamic Family and Social Services Association and the Mennonite Central Committee looked on.

His youngest son, age five, buried his face in his mother’s skirt.

It was the children who made the arrival so emotional, said Huda Mawed, a distant relative of the family.

“It’s just nice to see them safe and out of harm,” a teary Mawed said.

The Syrian conflict erupted in 2011. It has left almost four million people as refugees. The Mennonite Central Committee in Alberta, which has a decades-long tradition of privately sponsoring refugees, wanted to assist the families affected by the catastrophic civil war.

Through community connections, the Mennonite group partnered with Islamic Family and Social Services Association, or IFSSA, to find families to sponsor. The Mennonite organization holds a refugee sponsorship arrangement with the federal government.

“The missing piece from IFSSA is they have no sponsorship arrangement with the government,” said Donna Entz, with the Mennonite Church of Alberta. The Mennonite Central Committee “is ultimately responsible, because we signed the papers, but there’s been a memo of understanding between IFSSA and us that (they) are responsible for the settlement, providing the housing for the year and helping find them a job.”

Entz spent most of her adult life with the Mennonite Church in Burkina Faso in Africa and returned to Canada in 2010.

Mohammad Shafia and his gang terrorize inmates to attend Friday prayers

Senate committee hears about Shafia, serving life sentence for 2009 murders of 1st wife, 3 daughters

CBC News Posted: May 05, 2015 11:22 AM ET Last Updated: May 05, 2015 12:42 PM ET

Mohammad Shafia, his wife, Tooba Yahya and their son, Hamed, were convicted in 2012 of the murders of the couple's three daughters and Shafia's first wife. A national security committee was told Tuesday that Mohammad Shafia intimidated inmates into attending prayers.Mohammad Shafia, his wife, Tooba Yahya and their son, Hamed, were convicted in 2012 of the murders of the couple’s three daughters and Shafia’s first wife. A national security committee was told Tuesday that Mohammad Shafia intimidated inmates into attending prayers.
The Montreal man serving a life sentence for killing his wife and three teenage daughters intimidated other prisoners to the point that one asked to be put in isolation, a Senate committee has heard. Psychologist Robert Groves, who worked in Kingston Penitentiary, testified Monday before the national security and defence committee hearing on security threats facing Canada. He said he met with one particular non-Muslim inmate who went to great lengths to avoid Shafia.

“It turned out that he felt so intimidated by Shafia and some of his lieutenants, that he chose to give up his relative freedom of movement on the range in the general population for a much more restricted life on a social isolation range,” Groves said. “He could no longer come to see me. I had to go to his cell on the isolation range. He advised me that confinement was worth it to avoid the hassle of dealing with ‘the Muslims’” After his first-degree murder conviction in 2012, Shafia took on a religious leadership role at the Kingston Penitentiary — the onetime maximum-security prison — organizing Friday prayers when the sole Imam permitted to minister to inmates in Canada was not available, according to Groves.