HIJAB AND HIGH HEELS

HIJAB AND HIGH HEELS

By Madi Lussier
Wednesday, September 10, 2008

In the western world, covered women are not something out of the ordinary anymore.  One can see them everywhere, sometimes in the least expected places such as cosmetics departments, looking for hair dye, make up or simply in a women’s garments department, admiring some very sexy lingerie.
One can see them on the beach, at festivals, you name it, perhaps on a mission given by their imam.
I might say that these covered women want to prove us, maybe a bit too hard, that they feel integrated in this society. Plus, I might deduce that our world pleases them much more than their world. Here, covered or not, a woman can walk hand in hand with her partner, a serious misconduct punishable in an Islamic country, governed by Sharia. They can sit at the same table at a restaurant and enjoy their meal together, as a civilized couple.
The debate over the wearing of the hijab, nikab or burka in our world has not ended and it is not likely to end too soon.
Opinions are divided between those who defend the Islamic clothes, considering that they do not interfere with the values of a secular society and those who are against these garments as they are perceived as segregationist and insulting to western women and their history of fight for equal rights, respect and freedoms.
Those who wear a hijab in Canada also defend the headdress as they declare that wearing it is their free decision.

Jian Ghomeshi trial: Lucy DeCoutere wrote accused that she wanted to have sex with him after alleged assault

Jian Ghomeshi trial: Lucy DeCoutere wrote accused that she wanted to have sex with him after alleged assault

‘I am sad we didn’t spend the night together’, DeCoutere wrote Ghomeshi

By Mark Gollom, CBC News Posted: Feb 05, 2016 5:00 AM ET Last Updated: Feb 05, 2016 8:57 PM ET

Jian Ghomeshi leaves a Toronto courthouse after the fourth day of his sexual assault trial wrapped up.

Jian Ghomeshi leaves a Toronto courthouse after the fourth day of his sexual assault trial wrapped up. (David Donelly/CBC)

Lucy DeCoutere emailed Jian Ghomeshi hours after an alleged sexual assault saying she wanted to have sex with him, and sent him a handwritten letter days later saying she was sad they didn’t spend the night together, court heard today.

Lucy DeCoutere

“You kicked my ass last night and that makes me want to f–k your brains out tonight,” DeCoutere emailed Ghomeshi about 1:30 a.m.

It was one of a series of emails unveiled by Ghomeshi’s lawyer, Marie Henein, sent to the former CBC Radio host by the Trailer Park Boysactress in the years following the alleged assault. DeCoutere claims she was choked and slapped by Ghomeshi at his Toronto home following a dinner date in July 2003.

​Ghomeshi, 48, who lives in Toronto, has pleaded not guilty in provincial court to four counts of sexual assault and one count of overcoming resistance by choking, all related to alleged assaults from 2002 to 2003. A judge alone is hearing the case.

The identities of the two other complainants in the case are protected under a publication ban, but DeCoutere, also an air force captain, went to court to lift the ban on her name.

Teacher reprimanded for calling Muslim student ‘Taliban’, agrees to take re-education course

Teacher reprimanded for calling Muslim student ‘Taliban’

Matthew Shaun Pell also agreed to take a course on ‘Building Cultural Intelligence’ in the workplace

CBC News Posted: Jan 28, 2016 4:32 PM PT Last Updated: Jan 28, 2016 4:36 PM PT

Sooke math teacher Matthew Shaun Pell has been reprimanded for referring to a Muslim student as ‘Taliban’.

A Vancouver Island high school teacher has been reprimanded for repeatedly referring to a Muslim student as ‘Taliban” in front of other students.

According to a consent resolution agreement posted by B.C.’s Commissioner for Teacher Regulation, Matthew Shaun Pell also made “comments such as ‘don’t make her angry otherwise she’ll bomb you’ or ‘she’s going to blow everything up.'”

The incidents happened in 2014 in Pell’s Grade 11 math class in the Sooke school district.

The student’s family background was Middle Eastern and Muslim.

“Pell’s comments made Student A and her classmates, feel very uncomfortable,” the consent resolution reads.

The Sooke district issued Pell a warning letter in May 2015. The teacher regulation branch released their decision this month.

According to the agreement, Pell admitted that his actions constituted professional misconduct.

He has also agreed to complete a course called Building Cultural Intelligence in Your Workplace by the end of June 2016. 

Syrian-migrant families need two- and three-bedroom apartments, agencies struggle to find them

Agencies scour Ottawa for low-cost housing for Syrian refugees

Families from Syria arrive at the Ottawa airport in late December.
Families from Syria arrive at the Ottawa airport in late December. JULIE OLIVER / OTTAWA CITIZEN

The number of government-sponsored Syrian refugees who land in Ottawa is expected to more than double during the next month to 1,100 as local settlement agencies race to find housing for the newcomers.

In the coming week, about 35 Syrian refugees a day are expected to arrive in the city, said Carl Nicholson, executive director of the Catholic Centre for Immigrants, the agency responsible for the initial care of the Ottawa arrivals.

“It’s a very dynamic, fluid situation,” Nicholson told reporters Thursday after a meeting at city hall designed to improve co-ordination between the city’s settlement agencies.

A apartment building at 1240 Donald Street in Ottawa will soon be home to a large number of Syrian refugees

An apartment building at 1240 Donald St. will soon be home to a large number of Syrian refugees.DARREN BROWN / OTTAWA CITIZEN

The Syrian refugees are now being temporarily housed at the Maison Sophia Reception House and at three local hotels, where they’re equipped with health cards, social insurance numbers and banking information.

The big challenge now, Nicholson said, is to find enough two- and three-bedroom apartments for the large Syrian families that have arrived.

Out of the 90 families that have already landed, he said, accommodation has been found for 55 of them. Most of the families have four or five members; about 60 per cent of the new arrivals are children.

“Clearly, they want to live in places where there are concentrations of people like them, but we can’t always do that,” said Nicholson. “So sometimes, it takes persuading. They want to live together: It’s normal. It’s comfort, it’s security in a strange place.”

Syrian migrants dislike living in a hotel, feel like in a “prison” and would rather go back to their refugee camps

Syrians feel ‘hopeless’ as government-sponsored refugees in Toronto, mother says

Volunteers worry about 2-tier system as some newcomers face isolation in Canada

CBC News Posted: Jan 25, 2016 8:43 AM ET Last Updated: Jan 26, 2016 6:42 AM ET

Some Syrian refugees sponsored by the government say they're not getting much help in Canada from Immigration Minister John McCallum, right, and would rather go back to their refugee camps overseas, such as this one in Lebanon.

Some Syrian refugees sponsored by the government say they’re not getting much help in Canada from Immigration Minister John McCallum, right, and would rather go back to their refugee camps overseas, such as this one in Lebanon. (Bilal Hussein/Associated Press)

Some government-sponsored Syrian refugees staying at a budget hotel in Toronto say they feel like they’re “trapped in a prison” without hope due to a lack of communication, supplies and assistance. 

Virginia Johnson, one of two volunteers working at the hotel, joined CBC Radio’s Metro Morning on Monday to speak to host Matt Galloway.

Johnson said the refugees have been at the hotel for weeks and have no idea when they will be able to leave. Some of the 85 government-sponsored refugees say they’re not getting much help, and would rather go back to their refugee camps in Jordan and Lebanon. 

“The settlement agencies are overwhelmed,” said Johnson. “There’s a huge opportunity for individuals to step up and help.”

‘I don’t expect them to feel gratitude immediately when they’ve come here — they’re really so isolated.’– Virginia Johnson, volunteer

(…)

“We were told that when we arrived to the hotel that we would only be staying for three to four days maximum. However, things have been changed and we’ve been here for 10 to 11 days, and we’ve been told it could be even longer. The problem is that we have kids and we would rather be outside in a settled house than sitting at a hotel,” Abu-Rukti said.

“We feel like our kids are just stuck here. We go into one room, we eat, and then we return to other room and just go to bed. Our kids don’t have anywhere to play, nowhere to go out. We feel like we’re just trapped in a prison.”

Surrey schools struggle to place Syrian migrants

 

By Eric MacKenzie

Syrian refugee students raise their hands as they attend class in a UNICEF school at the Al Zaatari refugee camp, Jordan, March 11, 2015

Syrian refugee students raise their hands as they attend class in a UNICEF school at the Al Zaatari refugee camp, Jordan, March 11, 2015 Photo by Muhammad Hamed/Reuter

With some Surrey schools already facing overcrowding, the district is looking for ways to best accommodate the coming arrival of hundreds of Syrian refugee students.

And with little control over where government-assisted and privately sponsored refugee families may settle, that could mean transporting students to out-of-catchment schools once they’re ready to enter the classroom.

“We’ll be looking at all ways that we can to make it work,” said Doug Strachan, communication services manager for the Surrey School District.

“But that’s certainly one of the options if we have to.”

Fewer than 10 refugee students have begun attending schools in the Surrey district, but more than 300 are expected to arrive before the end of the school year. With some institutions already at capacity, making space for the incoming students will be a challenge, but not impossible, said Strachan.

“The over-capacity schools that we have right now are in three primary areas in the district, so there are schools with some vacancies outside those main three neighbourhoods,” he said. “We’re hopeful that we can work with the community partners and have a bias to the location of families if possible so that it’s straightforward for them to attend the schools where we have space.

“Obviously, there are a lot of variables there, including where they can get accommodation,” Strachan continued. “But we’ll work it out.”

The Surrey district is also one of several in Metro Vancouver impacted by the incoming refugees who have been working with the ministries of education and immigration to ensure funding will be in place for the new students.

There is a student head count upcoming in mid-February that will be submitted to the province to establish funding needs for the remainder of the year, but most incoming students will not arrive in time to be included. Although the province has committed to funding education for all refugee students – previously stating that allotments for students arriving after February would start going to school districts in April – but some questions remain about how that process will work.

“We’re confident that the (Ministry of Education) and government will be funding those refugee students, but it just means that there will have to be a different process,” said Strachan, noting that the total cost of accommodating 300-plus students would exceed $200,000.

“It’s a question mark that we have that may create some delays.”