Syrian migrants with disabilities have trouble finding appropriate housing

Some Syrian refugees fed up after months in temporary housing

Settlement agency says it’s working ‘flat out’ to find housing, but refugees refusing offers

By Catherine Rolfsen, CBC News Posted: Apr 21, 2016 10:35 AM PT Last Updated: Apr 21, 2016 2:37 PM PT

Fayzeh Ramadan and her 15-year-old son Mohamed Alsedawe in the doorway of their East Vancouver motel. Mohamed hasn't been able to start school because the family doesn't have a permanent home.

Two of the Alsidawe daughters are disabled. A nerve problem called neurogenic atrophy means they have little to no movement in their lower bodies.

Fayzeh Ramadan and her 15-year-old son Mohamed Alsedawe in the doorway of their East Vancouver motel. Mohamed hasn’t been able to start school because the family doesn’t have a permanent home. (Catherine Rolfsen)

Some Syrian refugees living in limbo months after arriving in Canada say they feel frustrated, and ignored by settlement workers.

“When we came at first, we have a hope … but now we lost the hope,” said Hatem Alsidawe, through an interpreter.

Alsidawe, 19, has been living with his family — four siblings aged 15 to 26 and his mother, a widow — in a motel unit in East Vancouver since early February. 

Vancouver needs more permanent houses for Syrian migrants

Vancouver behind in housing Syrian refugees

SURREY, BC: March 9, 2016 -- Mohamad El Refaie, left holds his blind daughter Heba, 7 as his wife mother Shamia El Refaie, right holds their other daughter Lema, 4 a hotel in Surrey, B.C. Wednesday March 9, 2016. The family fled Syria as refugees. (photo by Ric Ernst / PNG) (Story by Tara Carman) TRAX #: 00042133A [PNG Merlin Archive]

The El Refaie family has moved from temporary housing in a Surrey hotel to a permanent home. RIC ERNST / VANCOUVER SUN

High housing prices have meant Syrian refugees in Metro Vancouver have had a harder time finding permanent housing than those who were settled elsewhere in Canada, with some waiting close to four months.

Nationally, more than 90 per cent of government-assisted Syrian refugees have found permanent housing, and in some cities, such as Ottawa, all have been housed.

In Metro Vancouver, there are 29 Syrian families still in temporary housing, said Chris Friesen, settlement services director with the Immigrant Services Society of B.C. Three of those families arrived in late December, and one has been shuffled between three temporary housing sites over that time period.

The Immigrant Services Society has found homes for 13 of the remaining families, including two of the three who have been here since December. They will be moving in the next 10 days, Friesen said, leaving 16 families still to house.

The cost of housing coupled with large family sizes — often in excess of six people — has made housing refugee families more of a challenge in Vancouver and Toronto than in other parts of the country, especially Alberta, where an economic downturn has depressed housing prices, Friesen said.

Victoria faces a similar challenge, with about 25 Syrian families in that city in need of permanent housing. Some of the refugees who initially arrived in Victoria have gone farther afield, to the Duncan area, in search of affordable housing.

In the past month, three of the Syrian families who came first to Vancouver were relocated to Vernon, Penticton and Summerland.

Montreal teen convicted of terror charges

Montreal teen convicted of terror charges must serve another 16 months

Lyne Décarie, the prosecutor in the case of a teenager convicted in December on two terrorism-related charges, leaves the courtroom at Montreal Youth Court on Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2015.
Lyne Décarie, the prosecutor in the case of a teenager convicted in December on two terrorism-related charges, leaves the courtroom at Montreal Youth Court on Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2015. DARIO AYALA / MONTREAL GAZETTE FILE PHOTO

For the father of a Montreal teenager convicted of terrorism, the three-year sentence his boy received Wednesday, though the maximum allowed under youth offender laws, was an enormous weight off his shoulders.

“After wanting us dead, we have now renewed the love between a father and his son,” the man told the court, speaking publicly for the first time since the trial began in September. “My son has not changed 100 per cent, but he is on the path to change.”

The young man was found guilty in December of robbing a dépanneur in association with a terrorist group — ISIS — and trying to leave the country to carry out terrorist acts abroad.

Detained since his arrest in October, 2014, the teenager, who can’t be named because of a publication ban, was sentenced to another 16 months in youth detention followed by eight months in the community.

The 16-year-old will then be under probation for another year, under strict and unusual conditions: no social media, regular sessions with an imam or theologian, and staying out of a certain area of Montreal — notably the campus of Collège de Maisonneuve.

While there had been speculation that the Crown would seek to have him tried as an adult — in which case the young man might have faced a possible life sentence — the Crown and defence lawyers instead followed the recommendations of several experts who believe the boy, while remaining very religious, has become more flexible in his thinking.

(…)

Brad Salzberg: Liberal-Socialism And The Erosion Of Christian Canada

Liberal-Socialism And The Erosion Of Christian Canada

writer: Brad Salzberg, March 2016

http://capforcanada.com

Christian Cross Special Design Pin with Canada Flag

Image source

In the world of politics, as with many situations in life, making promises often leads to unexpected results. Nowhere is this more apparent than when considering the post-election behaviour of Canada’s ruling Liberal government.

The examples are many— a pronouncement of a 10 billion dollar federal deficit, which turned out to be triple that amount.  An increase in the Syrian refugee quota from the original 25,000 to 55,000—a quantity the majority of Canadians oppose— are two of the most prominent.

In fairness, broken promises are not exclusive to our Liberal government. What is exclusive to the Liberals, however, is the extent to which they disregard public opinion. Of course, there is a good reason for this. The Canadian public—at least those of us born and raised in Canada— are all but meaningless to our ruling Liberal government.

Durham Regional Police Service to organize workshop on “Islamophobia”

FREE REGISTER

PLEASE BE ADVISED THIS EVENT IS LIMITED TO EMPLOYEES OF THE REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF DURHAM.  ALL NON-RELATED REGISTRATIONS WILL BE REVIEWED AND/OR REMOVED.

This workshop focuses on Islamophobia (or anti-Muslim sentiment) or the prejudice against, hatred towards, or fear of the religion of Islam or Muslims. 

Guesst Speaker Bio’s:  Click Here

Guest Speakers
Amira Elghawaby National Council of Canadian Muslims Amira Elghawaby obtained an honours degree in Journalism and Law from Carleton University in 2001. Since then, she has worked as both a full-time and freelance journalist, writing and producing stories for a variety of media including CBC Radio, the Ottawa Citizen, the Toronto Star and The Globe and Mail. In 2012, she joined NCCM as the organization’s Human Rights Coordinator to advocate for the human rights & civil liberties of diverse communities. In 2015, Amira became NCCM’s Communications Director and she now leads the NCCM’s media relations, public engagement and strategic communications
Yasin Dwyer Office of the Chaplain Imam Yasin Dwyer was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba to parents of Jamaican heritage. He has served as a faith-based chaplain with the Correctional Service of Canada for the past 12 years. During that time Imam Yasin has also worked as a consultant and advisor with the Queen’s University chaplaincy team. Imam Yasin lectures extensively on topics of traditional Islamic spirituality, interfaith dialogue and the history of Muslims in the West.
Dr. Barbara Perry Associate Dean, Faculty of Social Science and Humanities, UOIT Dr. Barbara Perry has written extensively in the area of hate crime, including several books; among them:  In the Name of Hate: Understanding Hate Crimes  Hate and Bias Crime: A Reader  The Silent Victims: Hate Crimes Against Native Americans She is also General Editor of a five-volume set on hate crime (Praeger), and Editor of Volume 3: The Victims of Hate Crime, which is part of that set. Dr. Perry has also written on policing diverse communities, including work on social control in Native American communities. She has made substantial contributions to the limited scholarship on hate crime in Canada. Most recently, she has contributed to a scholarly understanding of anti-Muslim violence, hate crime against LGBTQ communities, and the community impacts of hate crime
WHEN
WHERE
Durham Regional Headquarters – 605 Rossland Road East, Whitby, ON L1N 0B7, Canada –View Map

Somali Ayanle Hassan Ali, accused in military centre stabbing, once worked at Pearson airport

Ayanle Hassan Ali, accused in military centre stabbing, once worked at Pearson airport

Airport authority confirms Ali had access to restricted areas for a period 6 years ago

CBC News Posted: Mar 16, 2016 6:32 PM ET Last Updated: Mar 16, 2016 6:58 PM ET

Ayanle Hassan Ali, 27, is facing nine criminal charges following an attack on a Canadian Forces recruitment centre in Toronto. Officials at Toronto's Pearson airport confirmed Wednesday that he had once worked there for a third-party tenant.

Ayanle Hassan Ali, 27, is facing nine criminal charges following an attack on a Canadian Forces recruitment centre in Toronto. Officials at Toronto’s Pearson airport confirmed Wednesday that he had once worked there for a third-party tenant. (Toronto Police Service)

The man accused of attacking a Canadian Forces recruitment centre in Toronto once worked for several months at Pearson International Airport and had access to restricted areas.

Ayanle Hassan Ali, a 27-year-old born in Montreal who has lived in Toronto from the age of two, faces nine criminal charges including three counts of attempted murder following Monday’s attack, which sent two members of the military to hospital with minor injuries.