Toronto black community leaders say the African Canadian community needs its own children’s aid society

Dec 13, 2014 |

Black children’s aid society needed, lawyers say

Toronto black community leaders say the African Canadian community needs its own children’s aid society

Black children’s aid society needed, lawyers say

Andrew Francis Wallace / Toronto Star

African Canadian Legal Clinic policy and research lawyer, Anthony N. Morgan, speaks to media during a news conference at the agency’s downtown Toronto offices, December 12, 2014. The ACLC was responding to a Toronto Star investigation into the disproportionate number of black kids in foster and group home care.
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The “alarming” numbers of black children in foster and group home care mean the African Canadian community needs its own children’s aid society, say leaders in Toronto’s black community.

GTA: The Black Experience Project (BEP) launching groundbreaking research study on GTA’s black communities

The Black Experience Project in the GTA

The Environics Institute, in partnership with Ryerson’s Diversity Institutethe United Way of Greater Toronto, and the YMCA of Greater Toronto, is launching a groundbreaking research study focusing on the Black community in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA).

The Black Experience Project

The purpose of The Black Experience Project (BEP) is to create the first-ever comprehensive understanding of the diverse communities that make up the region’s Black population through exploring the lived experiences and views that speak to individual and collective strengths, contributions, challenges, opportunities, capacity and resiliency.

MONTREAL: Ethics committee resumes hearing into police actions in 2010 murder of Maria Altagracia Dorval by estranged husband, Edens Kenol

Ethics committee resumes hearing into police actions in 2010 murder

Published on: Last Updated: 

Maria Altagracia Dorval, a 28-year-old mother of three, was killed in her Montreal North apartment a week after she went to police for help.

Montreal Gazette File Photo

The highest-ranking police officer of the five cited for breach of ethics in the Montreal police department’s handling of the late Maria Altagracia Dorval’s complaint against her abusive husband testified Monday at the Police Ethics Committee hearings into the case.

Dorval, a 28-year-old mother of three, was killed in her Montreal North apartment a week after she went to police for help. Her case has become a symbol of the justice system’s inadequate response to conjugal violence victims, and has already resulted in some changes to police procedures when dealing with spousal abuse cases.

The hearing, ordered back in August of 2011, has been delayed by the appointment of a new committee chair and by the illness of at least one of the officers cited.

Dorval was murdered on Oct. 17, 2010, six days after she reported to police that her estranged husband, Edens Kenol, had threatened to kill her and their three children two months earlier. She reported that more recently he had been following her, banging on her apartment door and harassing her by phone.

No police detective had responded to Dorval’s complaint by the time of her murder. Kenol was convicted of first degree murder in the spring of 2013, and is serving a life sentence with no chance of parole until 2038.

On Monday, Sgt. Det. Marcel Thifault testified that he was handed the Dorval file at about 11:30 a.m. on Oct. 12, the day after Dorval had made her report. The controller, who assigns cases at the eastern Montreal investigation centre, told Thifault this was an “urgent” case. Thifault said he quickly skimmed the file, and when he saw it contained allegations of death threats against the woman and her three children, he quickly handed it to a detective on duty.

That detective, who is not cited in the ethics breach, came back moments later to tell Thifault that the incident regarding the death threats had taken place two months earlier, on Aug. 16.

“At that moment, I asked myself why this victim waited from Aug. 16 until Oct. 11 to report this,” Thifault testified. “I decided to read the whole file. … I thought if she was really afraid for her life that day, as soon as (Kenol) left she would have called the police. I noticed that since Aug. 16, the suspect had not posed any similar gestures.”

Ratna Omidvar: “The people who sit in boardrooms and hold corporate power look like Old Canada; they don’t look like New Canada.”

Ratna Omidvar on growth through diversity: ‘The people who … hold corporate power look like Old Canada’

ELIZABETH PINNINGTON

Contributed to The Globe and Mail

Published 

Last updated 

In a six-week series of interviews, Canadians with a variety of experiences discuss the major challenges our country is facing and how best to address them. This instalment deals with increasing the innovativeness of our economy.

Ratna Omidvar, executive director of the Global Diversity Exchange at the Ted Rogers School of Management at Ryerson University, was interviewed on Oct. 16 by Elizabeth Pinnington, a consultant with Reos Partners.

TORONTO: Racism is cause of so many black children in foster and group homes, claim advocates

Why are so many black children in foster and group homes?

A disproportionate number of Toronto-area children in foster and group-home care are black. Advocates are blaming poverty, cultural misunderstanding and racism.

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Paul Chapman, who was 9 when he was removed from his family home, says many black youth "struggle" while in care. "They kind of lose themselves," he says.
JIM RANKIN / TORONTO STAR Order this photo

Paul Chapman, who was 9 when he was removed from his family home, says many black youth “struggle” while in care. “They kind of lose themselves,” he says.

By:  News, Insight , Social justice reporter ,Published on Thu Dec 11 2014

In the Toronto area, black children are being taken from their families and placed into foster and group-home care at much higher rates than white children.

Numbers obtained by the Star indicate that 41 per cent of the children and youth in the care of the Children’s Aid Society of Toronto are black. Yet only 8.2 per cent of Toronto’s population under the age of 18 is black.

TORONTO: Jamie Forbes arrested in sex trade case

CBC News Posted: Dec 01, 2014 3:25 PM ET Last Updated: Dec 01, 2014 3:25 PM ET

Police have laid 20 charges against a man they allege forced two teenage girls into the sex trade industry.

Toronto police say two 15-year-old girls were assaulted and taken to a Toronto hotel where they were forced to work in the sex trade over two days and forfeit all of their money to the male suspect.

Investigators from the Sex Crimes — Human Trafficking Enforcement Team began their investigation last Friday. On the same day, they arrested 32-year-old Jamie Forbes, of Toronto.

He faces several charges, including two counts of trafficking in persons by recruiting, two counts of forcible confinement and two counts of assault.

Police say there may be more victims.

Anyone with information is asked to contact police at 416-808-7474 or via Crime Stoppers.