Bhupinderpal Gill and Gurpreet Ronald charged with first-degree murder in the death of Jagtar Gill, Bhupinderpal’s wife

Co-accused in murder trial were in long-standing affair, conspired to kill, Crown contends

Bhupinderpal Gill, victim’s husband, and Gurpreet Ronald spoke for dozens of hours before killing

By Laurie Fagan, CBC News Posted: May 20, 2016 11:44 AM ET Last Updated: May 20, 2016 4:44 PM ET

Bhupinderpal Gill, left, and Gurpreet Ronald, right, have been charged with first-degree murder in the January 2014 death of Jagtar Gill, Bhupinderpal's wife.

Bhupinderpal Gill, left, and Gurpreet Ronald, right, have been charged with first-degree murder in the January 2014 death of Jagtar Gill, Bhupinderpal’s wife. (CBC)

The husband of a woman who was found beaten and stabbed to death in their home in 2014 “hated his wife” and didn’t consider divorce an option, the Crown alleged during opening statements on the first day of a high-profile murder trial in Ottawa.

Bhupinderpal Gill, the husband, and Gurpreet Ronald, a neighbour, are each charged with first-degree murder in the death of Jagtar Gill and have pleaded not guilty. Both worked as bus drivers for OC Transpo.

The two accused are being tried together, but each have their own defence lawyers.  ​

Crown prosecutor Jason Neubauer told Ontario Superior Court that Ronald and Bhupinderpal Gill were involved in a long-standing affair of a year and a half and that they conspired to kill Jagtar Gill, whom Ronald hated as well.

Phone records show the co-accused spoke for about 48 hours during hundreds of calls in the 28 days leading up to the killing and met each other repeatedly, Neubauer told court.

HALIFAX: Taxi driver Seyed Mirsaeid-Ghazi charged with sexual assault

Halifax cab driver charged with sexual assault of 21-year-old woman

Seyed Mirsaeid-Ghazi, 45, has been charged in relation to the October incident

The Halifax Regional Police badge

METRO FILE

The Halifax Regional Police badge

A Halifax taxi driver faces a sexual assault charge after police said he sexually touched a 21-year-old woman in his cab last fall.

At about 11:30 p.m. on Oct.23, 2015, a man driving a taxi in the area of Windsor and Allen streets picked up a 21-year-old female passenger he had driven on previous occasions.

According to a police release issued Friday, the man touched the woman in a sexual manner without her consent before dropping her off at her requested destination in Halifax.

Police said the incident was reported on Nov.16, 2015.

On Thursday, 45-year-old Seyed Mirsaeid-Ghazi was arrested without incident.

Police said he was released on conditions to have no female passengers in his vehicle, and no passengers in the front seat, while operating under a taxi licence.

Mirsaeid-Ghazi will appear in Halifax provincial court on June 9 to face the sexual assault charge.

*This article previously stated the date of the incident was October, 2016 when the correct date is October, 2015.

Canada’s immigration system vulnerable to fraud, says lawyer

Canada’s immigration system vulnerable to fraud, says lawyer

‘It’s not a perfect system by any stretch’

CBC News Posted: Apr 27, 2016 9:17 AM ET Last Updated: Apr 27, 2016 9:17 AM ET

Windsor immigration lawyer Eddie Kadri says an alleged case of misinformation on a passport shows there are cracks in Canada's immigration system.

Windsor immigration lawyer Eddie Kadri says an alleged case of misinformation on a passport shows there are cracks in Canada’s immigration system. (Jonathan Pinto/CBC)

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A Windsor, Ont. immigration lawyer says an alleged case of passport fraud in Windsor may be only one of many cases to slip through the cracks in Canada’s immigration system.

“We have a good system [but] it’s not a perfect system by any stretch,” Eddie Kadri told CBC Radio’s Windsor Morning. “Professionals like myself are advocating to change and close these cracks where people slip through, because it happens all the time.”

Police searching for two suspects in Toronto ‘gang war’ kidnapping

Police searching for two suspects in Toronto ‘gang war’ kidnapping

Three men and one teen have been charged in connection with the abduction and beating of two 17-year-old gang members

Toronto police say two teenage gang members were kidnapped and tortured in retaliation for a condo shootout.

Police are searching for Lincoln Anthony Richards, 23 and Thai-Shay Gordon, 17, wanted in connection with an Apr. 19 kidnapping and beating.

TORONTO POLICE SERVICE HANDOUT Police are searching for Lincoln Anthony Richards, 23 and Thai-Shay Gordon, 17, wanted in connection with an Apr. 19 kidnapping and beating.

Now three young men have been charged and two more are wanted.

Investigators say that, in the early hours of April 19, members of the Young Buck Killers gang were partying in an Airbnb-rented condo on the 25th floor of a building near Front St. and Blue Jays Way.

The revellers heard that members of a rival gang, the Queens Drive Crips, were going to show up uninvited.

Four Young Bucks went downstairs to look for the gatecrashers.

When they came back upstairs, the Queen Drive Crips were waiting for them in the hallway.

Security footage shows the gang members opening fire as the elevator doors open. Police do not believe anyone was seriously injured in the shootout.

Later on April 19, two 17-year-olds involved with the Queens Drive Crips were kidnapped when they arrived at a Swansea Mews townhouse complex that police say is associated with the Young Buck Killers.

In a news conference Thursday, Staff Inspector Mike Earl said police believe the kidnapping was in retaliation for the condo ambush.

“I wouldn’t call this an ‘innocent stranger’ kidnapping,” Earl said. “This is basically a gang-war kidnapping.”

The two boys were tied to chairs and beaten, threatened with a gun, and forced to play Russian Roulette with a loaded handgun.

At one point a shot was fired on the property.

Police were called to the area twice during this time on reports of suspicious activity, but they were not able to find anything.

After police showed up in the area, the kidnappers moved the boys to locations in the Flemingdon Park and Lawrence Heights neighbourhoods.

Earl said they were tied to chairs again and beaten throughout the day. It is also alleged that they were forced to perform sexual acts.

Ransom demands were made to the boys’ families.

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Some immigration consultants violating rules of private refugee sponsorship program

CBC INVESTIGATES

Some immigration consultants violating rules of private refugee sponsorship program

Syrians in Gulf states being asked to pay settlement funds that are supposed to be paid by private sponsors

By Laura Lynch, Ghalia Bdiwe, CBC News Posted: Apr 19, 2016 5:00 AM ET Last Updated: Apr 21, 2016 6:00 PM ET

Media placeholder

John McCallum to investigate immigration consultant fees 2:16
CBC News has learned about a troubling aspect of the drive to bring Syrians to Canada: professional immigration consultants, in partnership with some refugee sponsorship groups, are charging refugees thousands of dollars in arrangements that critics say are unethical and violate federal rules on sponsorship.

The immigration consultants have been targeting Syrians living in the Gulf states, many of whom are there on work permits and are able to earn a living. In that sense, they are potentially a more lucrative client base than those in refugee camps in Jordan, Lebanon and Turkey.

The consultants advertise on social media and make visits to the region, setting up shop in five-star hotels.

Arrival at the airport

Edmonton resident Nhung Tran-Davies welcomes a family of Syrian refugees she helped to sponsor in March. Canadians across the country have been raising money to privately sponsor Syrian refugees, but a CBC investigation has found that some Syrians coming from Gulf states are being asked to pay the cost of their resettlement up front by immigration consultants who are also charging thousands of dollars to process their applications. (Terry Reith/CBC)

In the case of one such agency, information available online and documents obtained by CBC News reveal that the consultant is not only charging prospective refugees thousands of dollars to process their applications but also asking them to pay the full cost of their resettlement up front, which violates the financial guidelines of the Private Sponsorship of Refugees Program.

“I find it appalling, honestly,” said Toronto lawyer Jackie Swaisland, who is part of a network of lawyers, immigration consultants and law students that has helped hundreds of refugees get to Canada without charging for their services.

Canada has resettled more than 26,000 Syrian refugees since last November, about 9,000 of whom are privately sponsored and another 2,225 of whom receive a combination of government and private funding.

Indo-Canadian women perpetuate gender inequality by practicing female foeticide in Canada

Indo-Canadian women give birth to far more boys than women born in Canada

The implication is that the disproportionate ratios are a result of “sex discrimination fuelled by son preference,” a study says.

 Baldev Mutta (centre), CEO of Brampton's Punjabi Community Health Services, is surrounded by his grand daughter Talon Mutta, 9 (left) and daughter Rakhi Mutta. Mutta is involved in initiatives to celebrate girls born to Indian parents. New research that says there is deficit of more than 4,000 girls to Indian-born parents in Canada, possibly linked to repeated second trimester abortions.BERNARD WEIL / TORONTO STAR Order this photo

Baldev Mutta (centre), CEO of Brampton’s Punjabi Community Health Services, is surrounded by his grand daughter Talon Mutta, 9 (left) and daughter Rakhi Mutta. Mutta is involved in initiatives to celebrate girls born to Indian parents. New research that says there is deficit of more than 4,000 girls to Indian-born parents in Canada, possibly linked to repeated second trimester abortions.

A preference for boys among Indian-born parents may have contributed to a deficit of more than 4,400 girls over two decades in what researchers in a new study are calling Canada’s “missing girls.”

The research, presented in the Canadian Medical Association Journal and the online CMAJ Open, looks at more than 6 million births in Canada and reveals that a greater presence of boys among Indian-born mothers may in part be linked to abortions in the second trimester, when parents can learn the baby’s sex.

The birth data was compiled from databases administered by Statistics Canada and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences in Toronto between 1990 and 2011, and 1993 to 2012, respectively.

“The main implication is that among some immigrant communities, males are placed at a higher value than females. This is not just about abortions, it is about gender equality,” said lead author Marcelo Urquia of St. Michael’s Hospital. “I hope that this is conducive to a respectful debate on the value of girls and women in today’s Canadian society.”

His study newly exposes a relationship between induced abortions and the previously reported large numbers of boys among Ontario’s Indian community, said Urquia, noting the data likely explains an imbalance in the rest of Canada too. Some of the “deficit” of girls may be due to “implantation of male embryos,” said Urquia, but the data is insufficient.

While the natural odds of having a boy over a girl are slightly higher, they are consistent across the globe: up to 107 boys for every 100 girls. But Indian-born mothers living in Canada with two children had 138 boys for every 100 girls. In Ontario, that number inflated even more among Indian-born women with two daughters, who then gave birth to 196 boys for every 100 girls.

After abortions, the numbers rise dramatically: 326 boys after one abortion, 409 boys after multiple abortions, and 663 boys for every 100 girls following multiple abortions in the second trimester, when doctors can determine the sex of the fetus.

Miscarriages, or spontaneous abortions, were not linked to the births of more boys, the study found.

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