Category Archives: Crime (type)

SURREY,B.C.: Serial killer Charles Kembo loses conviction appeal

Four-time Surrey murderer loses conviction appeal

Charles Kembo was found guilty in 2010 of the first-degree murder of four people. He lost an appeal of those convictions this week. - File Photo / The Leader

Charles Kembo was found guilty in 2010 of the first-degree murder of four people. He lost an appeal of those convictions this week.

— Image Credit: File Photo / The Leader

A Surrey man found guilty of the planned murders of four people, including his wife and step-daughter, has lost an appeal of his convictions.

A jury found Charles Eli Kembo guilty of four counts of first-degree murder in 2010. He sought to have those convictions overturned on the grounds the judge made numerous errors, including in her instructions to the jury, combining the evidence of the different murder counts and admitting prejudicial portions of a police statement and referring to that statement as a confession. Continue reading

MONTREAL: Africans buy stolen bikes and sell them in Africa

These men buy bikes legally, and then sell them to their home countries in Africa for four times the price. (Radio-Canada)

Every year, about 20,000 bicycles are stolen in Montreal

CBC News Posted: Feb 26, 2014 7:11 PM ET Last Updated: Feb 26, 2014 7:11 PM ET

An investigation carried out by Radio-Canada’s Enquête program found that selling stolen bikes is big business in Montreal.

Every year about 20,000 bicycles are stolen on the island, but most victims never report the theft to police. For instance, in 2012, only 1,846 bike thefts were reported.

Philippe and Dominique, whose identity we are not revealing, track down bicycle thieves.

“There are thieves who prowl the night, searching in alleyways and backyards, and simply help themselves,” Philippe said.

It’s estimated that one of of two cyclists in Montreal has had his/her bike stolen at least once.

For sale

Re-selling bikes is big business in Montreal.

A number of unclaimed stolen bikes end up at municipal auctions.

Enquête spoke with a group of men who buy the bikes legally for a small price, and then sell them in their home country in Africa for four times as much.

“I’ve been doing this for 10 years,” one man told Enquête reporters.

The investigative program also found there were suspicious transactions taking place at L’Accueil Bonneau, a homeless shelter in Montreal, where one man bought several bikes last summer.

Similar situations are occurring in some parks or streets.

One Enquête employee was offered a bike for $40 — although it was worth $600.

The seller said he stole it about a month earlier near Cadillac metro station, in Montreal’s east end.

(…)

 

MONTREAL: 78-old Julia Hidalgo-Aguilera wants to keep her to-be-deported son in Canada as primary caregiver

Ailing Montreal mother pleads for delay in son’s deportation

Mother and son plead for immigration leniencyHector Reyes-Hidalgo came to Canada four years ago to care for his ailing mother, Julia Hidalgo-Aguilera, who has ALS. But Hector is facing deportation to his native Chile if Immigration Canada doesn’t grant him a reprieve.
CTV Montreal
Published Sunday, July 27, 2014 6:28PM EDT
Last Updated Sunday, July 27, 2014 6:57PM EDT

It’s a desperate plea to Immigration Canada from a woman dying of ALS and her son.

Julia Hidalgo-Aguilera, 78, has lost most of the use of her legs and says her arms are growing weaker.

Her son Hector Reyes-Hidalgo came from Chile four years ago to care for her.

He’s her only family member in Canada and her primary caregiver, but he is set to be deported back to his home country Tuesday.

They’re making an appeal on compassionate grounds to delay his deportation next week.

Even the most basic tasks are almost impossible for Hidalgo-Aguilera — she has difficulty swallowing, moving and sometimes breathing.

Immigration Canada accepted a request for Hidalgo-Aguilera to sponsor her son’s immigration, but Reyes-Hidalgo was rejected in his bid to obtain a Quebec Selection Certificate, which he needs if he wants to live in Quebec.

So next week, he faces deportation.

“I’m thinking of my mother more than of me. I’m hoping for a solution soon,” he said.

Reyes-Hidalgo can contest Immigration Quebec’s decision in October, but without a stay of deportation from Immigration Canada, he won’t have a chance to plead his case.

That could prove to be devastating for his mother physically, emotionally and financially.

“I help pay the rent and pay a lot of things to maintain the house,” he said.

Letters of support have been written by doctors and politicians, including the leader of the official opposition Thomas Mulcair.

(…)

Read more: http://montreal.ctvnews.ca/ailing-montreal-mother-pleads-for-delay-in-son-s-deportation-1.1934471#ixzz38izfKlKW

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http://www.cpa.ca/cpasite/userfiles/documents/practice_page/burden_neuro_diseases_en.pdf

http://www.als.ca/sites/default/files/files/HealthcareProviders/Guide%20to%20ALS%20Patient%20Care.pdf

http://www.neurology.org/cgi/content/meeting_abstract/80/1_MeetingAbstracts/P07.065

 

TORONTO: “I just want to bomb Canada”, Ali Shahi said on board of Sunwing flight 772

Kendra Mangione and Sonja Puzic, CTVNews.ca
Published Friday, July 25, 2014 10:23AM EDT
Last Updated Friday, July 25, 2014 8:48PM EDT

The father of a 25-year-old Canadian man whose alleged threats forced a Panama-bound plane to return to Toronto Friday says his son has mental health issues and is “not at fault” for what happened.

In a statement released Friday night, Sadegh Shahi said his son, Ali Shahi, has had “mental issues,” including depression, anorexia and bulimia since he was 16.

“I am sorry for what happened on the flight, but Ali is not at fault. I blame the police and health system,” Shahi said, adding that his son “never got the support that he needed.” Continue reading

OTTAWA: Accused of unsanitary work, Dr. Christiane Farazli agrees to give up practicing medicine

Andrea Janus, CTVNews.ca
Published Friday, July 25, 2014 8:26AM EDT

An Ottawa doctor whose clinic was at the centre of an infection scare has agreed never to practice medicine again after the College of Physicians and Surgeons found her unprofessional and incompetent.

The College held a disciplinary hearing for Dr. Christiane Farazli on Thursday after dozens of patients also came forward to say that she had brutalized them during procedures, such as colonoscopies.

In reports submitted to the College’s discipline committee, Farazli’s former patients said they endured “unbearable pain” and “inadequate sedation” during procedures in her office. Another said Farazli enlisted the help of a visiting sales rep during a procedure when her nurse failed to show up for work. Continue reading

HAMILTON: Janos Acs, victim of the Domotor-Kolompar human-trafficking ring, commits suicide

HUMAN TRAFFICKING VICTIM

HUMAN TRAFFICKING VICTIM

Cathie Coward,The Hamilton Spectator

Janos Acs was among more than 20 people rescued in 2009 by RCMP from the hands of human traffickers who lured them from their native Hungary on the false promise of work.

In the early evening hours of June 10, Janos Acs walked onto train tracks in central Hamilton and lay down to die.

The 60-year-old’s suicide, near Emerald Street North, ended a troubled life that authorities thought they had saved.

Acs was among more than 20 people rescued in 2009 by RCMP from the hands of human traffickers who lured them from their native Hungary on the false promise of work. Despite the successful prosecution of his abusers and that he and other victims were given safe haven in Canada, Acs lived out his free days moving in and out of shelters, struggling to find work and drinking heavily.

The now infamous Domotor-Kolompar criminal organization was dismantled in 2010 and stands as the largest human trafficking case in Canadian history. Twenty-three members of the extended family were convicted of various charges between 2012 and 2013.

“I feel very much betrayed and I’m pretty frustrated,” Janos Acs told the Spectator

Canada Border Services Agency regional director Goran Vragovic said he learned of Acs’ death on Tuesday morning, before a news conference announcing that 20 members of thecriminal organization had been deported.

“It’s a tragic conclusion to an already sad story,” he said.

MORE: “There is no room in Canada” for modern day slavery

Spectator readers first met Acs in a Hamilton shelter in December 2010. He was the first victim willing to speak publicly.

“I feel very much betrayed and I’m pretty frustrated. I’m kind of all alone and I have no friends to discuss the situation,” he said during an interview for a Spectator special investigation, The gypsy kings, that followed the human traffickers to Hungary.

Acs grew up in a small Hungarian village called Bakonybel and, despite being in his 50s, had never been outside Hungary. He was approached by a member of the organization and offered a construction job in Canada. Ignoring warnings from family, Acs said he agreed.

He immediately realized his mistake.

“When I came over here, the situation became a servant and master thing,” he said.

Acs spent seven months living in the basement of his captor’s Mohawk Road East home. Along with working without pay, he was coached to apply for social assistance and claim to be mentally handicapped.

On two occasions, he escaped from the home, once approaching a police officer on the street. The officers didn’t understand what he was saying, so he went back.

When RCMP showed up in late 2009 and offered him an escape, he agreed to leave. But life in a men’s shelter was not what he thought it was going to be. He had hoped to bring his then 30-year-old son to Canada, but that never happened.

“I appreciate that people are helping me here, but I just can’t get used to this. I don’t regret that I came to Canada, but I didn’t figure it was going to be like this.”

Hamilton police spokesperson Constable Debbie McGreal-Dinning confirmed police were called to the “sudden death” on June 10, in the area of Emerald Street North and Birge Street. The death was deemed non-criminal and McGreal-Dinning said she could not comment further.

Fellow victim Tamas Miko didn’t know Acs well — they were housed in different homes — but news of his death is shocking.

Miko’s family was rescued from Hungary after being threatened over his agreement to testify in court. They live every day in the shadow of the criminal organization.

“I can’t just move on,” he said, adding that there is “so much hatred inside of me.”

Miko has gone back to school to get his high school equivalency. For now, his family lives together, unable to find work, collecting Ontario Works. It’s not the life he imagined for himself when he chose to come to Canada.

Shelley Gilbert, co-ordinator of social work services at Legal Assistance of Windsor, works with Miko to sort through the “roller-coaster” of emotions caused by “living with the effects of human trafficking.”

She’s also invited him to share his story with social service and justice professionals.

Gilbert said there is “no five-minute solution” to the anxieties and other issues survivors are faced with. That’s why there is a need for long-term intensive case management.

Miko said he hopes to one day work to “save people” like Walk With Me founder Timea Nagy did.

Nagy met the human trafficking victims, including Acs, when they were first rescued and continued to support them throughout the court cases. At the time, the Hamilton-based human trafficking rescue organization was just getting started and Nagy largely worked out of her car and got calls on her cellphone at all hours.

Nagy, a native of Hungary and sex trafficking survivor, helped the victims find shelter and often acted as a translator.

Unlike most other victims who fled to different cities to avoid threats, Acs stayed in Hamilton.

“He was troubled,” Nagy said, adding that he was in and out of shelters.

In recent years, Walk With Me bought a safe house that can house up to five victims at once. However, as awareness about human trafficking grows so too has demand for the organization’s services.

Walk With Me gets about $200,000 in funding every year, but to keep up with demand, Nagy said they really need $400,000. They are currently not accepting new clients in the safe house. They are doing front line victim care, but no longer have the staff to respond at any hour.

There is no network of safe houses or rescue organizations across Canada. Many victims, like Acs, end up in shelters.

Burlington MP Mike Wallace, who chairs the federal government’s justice committee said the government is working to help human trafficking victims.

“Have we done enough? I would say most of us would say no, we could do more. But we are actually taking action to make that happen,” he said this week.

Wallace pointed to changes to Canada’s immigration law that allow human trafficking victims to be fast-tracked to permanent resident status.

This law change has allowed the Hungarian victims to stay in Canada.

Wallace also noted the victim bill of rights, which will be debated in the fall. He said this will make victims “part of judicial system to give them a voice.”

 

noreilly@thespec.com

905-526-3199 | @NicoleatTheSpec

Mexican dolphin trainer Jahir Salas Vargas pleads guilty to possessing child pornography

Dolphin trainer gets 13 months for child porn 
TARA BOWIE, QMI AGENCY

FIRST POSTED: | UPDATED: 

Jahir Salas Vargas

Jahir Salas Vargas pleaded guilty to possessing child pornography on Tuesday. (Facebook photo)

WOODSTOCK, Ont. — A Mexican dolphin trainer who was in Canada on a one-year work visa was sentenced to 13 months and 19 days of jail time for possessing and making available graphic movies of child pornography through his computer.

Jahir Salas Vargas was arrested by Ontario Provincial Police on Oct. 9, 2013, when police executed a warrant at an Ingersoll, Ont., home where he was staying.

Police found 1,091 unique images and 83 unique movies featuring child pornography on a thumb drive and computers registered to Salas Vargas.

In September 2012 he received a one-year work visa to work with marine mammals at the West Edmonton Mall before moving temporarily to Ingersoll to house-sit a home owned by relatives.

(…)

Salas Vargas also had to provide DNA and is now listed on the sex offender registry.

Undeportable Michael Mvogo kept in jail for 8 years

Michael Mvogo, shown in an image taken from a photocopy, has been held without charge in a Canadian detention centre for eight years. He hasn't been deported because officials were unable for a long time to confirm his identity, and Cameroon, the country he revealed he is from, won't issue him documents.

 

Michael Mvogo, shown in an image taken from a photocopy, has been held without charge in a Canadian detention centre for eight years. He hasn’t been deported because officials were unable for a long time to confirm his identity, and Cameroon, the country he revealed he is from, won’t issue him documents.

By:  Immigration reporter, Published on Thu Jul 24 2014

Canada should immediately release a man who has been imprisoned for eight years over immigration violations, says a United Nations human rights monitoring body.

“The inability of a state party to carry out the expulsion of an individual does not justify detention beyond the shortest period of time or where there are alternatives to detention, and under no circumstances indefinite detention,” said the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights’ Working Group on Arbitrary Detentions. Continue reading

Toronto resident arrested as part of StubHub fraud ring run by Russians

Toronto resident arrested as part of StubHub fraud ring

TU THANH HA The Globe and Mail

Published 

Last updated 

A suspected money-launderer in Toronto is among at least 10 people who have been arrested in an international crackdown on a cyberfraud ring alleged to have compromised 1,600 accounts of the online ticket seller StubHub.

New York County authorities announced on Wednesday they had indicted six men, including Vadim Polyakov, a 30-year-old Russian citizen who is portrayed as the man who directed the operation and who was arrested while he was travelling in Spain. Continue reading