VANCOUVER: Li Zhao charged in killing and dismembering Gang Yuan

Gang Yuan, dismembered millionaire, allegedly killed for his money

B.C. Supreme Court petition claims victim financially supported accused killer’s family

By Jason Proctor, CBC News Posted: May 20, 2015 5:55 PM PT Last Updated: May 21, 2015 8:44 AM PT

Dismembered millionaire allegedly killed for his money 2:29

A court battle has erupted over the estate of wealthy businessman Gang Yuan, whose dismembered body was found last month at an exclusive West Vancouver address.

Yuan’s brother, Qiang Yuan, has obtained a B.C. Supreme Court order giving him the go-ahead on behalf of Yuan’s estate to sue Li Zhao, the man charged with second-degree murder in Yuan’s death.

In an unusual press conference, the family’s lawyer claimed Yuan was supporting Zhao and his wife, who was allegedly seen driving the victim’s Bentley within days of his death.

“So the question arises, why would someone kill his benefactor?” said Chris Johnson, who represents the victim’s brother and speculated about the motivation for the murder.

“With the known facts, there is really only one conclusion: Mr. Zhao did this for financial reasons. He thought that he could get a free house. Not just any house, but a very valuable house in West Vancouver.”

Widow, ex-soldier move for final judgment on $134M suit against Omar Khadr

Widow, ex-soldier move for final judgment on $134M suit against Omar Khadr

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BY COLIN PERKEL, THE CANADIAN PRESS ON MAY 17, 2015.
Omar Khadr walks out the front door of his lawyer Dennis Edney's home to speak the media in Edmonton, Thursday, May 7, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan DenetteOmar Khadr walks out the front door of his lawyer Dennis Edney’s home to speak the media in Edmonton, Thursday, May 7, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

TORONTO – The widow of an American special forces soldier killed in Afghanistan and another soldier partially blinded by a hand grenade have moved to finalize a default civil-suit judgment against former Guantanamo Bay prisoner Omar Khadr.

Court documents filed in Utah April 24, the day an Alberta court granted Khadr bail, show the plaintiffs are asking the courts to award them triple damages for a total of US$134.1 million.

Lawyer Laura Tanner, who represents Tabitha Speer and Layne Morris, said in an interview she would be filing a final order for the federal judge to review and sign within days.

Once that happens – final word on damages would be up to the judge – the families can move to have the judgment enforced against Khadr, 28, in a Canadian court.

(…)

Mohammad Shafia and his gang terrorize inmates to attend Friday prayers

Senate committee hears about Shafia, serving life sentence for 2009 murders of 1st wife, 3 daughters

CBC News Posted: May 05, 2015 11:22 AM ET Last Updated: May 05, 2015 12:42 PM ET

Mohammad Shafia, his wife, Tooba Yahya and their son, Hamed, were convicted in 2012 of the murders of the couple's three daughters and Shafia's first wife. A national security committee was told Tuesday that Mohammad Shafia intimidated inmates into attending prayers.Mohammad Shafia, his wife, Tooba Yahya and their son, Hamed, were convicted in 2012 of the murders of the couple’s three daughters and Shafia’s first wife. A national security committee was told Tuesday that Mohammad Shafia intimidated inmates into attending prayers.
The Montreal man serving a life sentence for killing his wife and three teenage daughters intimidated other prisoners to the point that one asked to be put in isolation, a Senate committee has heard. Psychologist Robert Groves, who worked in Kingston Penitentiary, testified Monday before the national security and defence committee hearing on security threats facing Canada. He said he met with one particular non-Muslim inmate who went to great lengths to avoid Shafia.

“It turned out that he felt so intimidated by Shafia and some of his lieutenants, that he chose to give up his relative freedom of movement on the range in the general population for a much more restricted life on a social isolation range,” Groves said. “He could no longer come to see me. I had to go to his cell on the isolation range. He advised me that confinement was worth it to avoid the hassle of dealing with ‘the Muslims’” After his first-degree murder conviction in 2012, Shafia took on a religious leadership role at the Kingston Penitentiary — the onetime maximum-security prison — organizing Friday prayers when the sole Imam permitted to minister to inmates in Canada was not available, according to Groves.

SURREY, B.C.: East Indian parents discuss ideas to prevent gang-related violence

Reaching young people most at-risk is crucial, forum hears

CBC News Posted: May 05, 2015 10:30 PM PT Last Updated: May 06, 2015 10:42 AM PT

The organizer of the event, Meera Gill, says more needs to be done to keep youth out of gangs.

Roughly 100 people gathered in Surrey on Tuesday to come up with ways to fight back against the spate of drug-related violence in the city.

People jotted down ideas, trying to figure out solutions for reaching young people who are most at-risk of becoming involved in gun and drug violence. Police say there is a gang turf war on the streets of Surrey that has spilled into Delta and resulted in 22 shootings and one homicide in six weeks.

“A lot of East Indian parents are so involved in work and unfortunately the problem with that is they’re so involved in trying to make a good living for their children that they don’t have the time to be involved in their children’s life,” says one Surrey parent Ruby Deol. 

Surrey teen Jayden Grewal says there is a lot of peer pressure to try drugs and sell them. 

“People keep on telling you to sell drugs, to try them. It’s really hard … as you’re talking to the older kids, you find out they’ve tried that stuff and [there is] a lot of peer pressure.”

The organizer of the event, Meera Gill, says more needs to be done to keep youth out of gangs. 

“We want to be at the preventive stage,” she says. ”When someone gets shot, that’s enforcement. RCMP will take care of that. But as parents, we want to say how can we save our kids before we get to that stage.”

Gill says the ideas they collect tonight will be sent to all three levels of government as well as Surrey RCMP.

TORONTO: Pakistani Mohammed Aqeeq Ansari to be deported, Jahanzeb Malik in custody

Pakistani immigrant declared security threat, to be deported, while another ordered back into custody

 | May 11, 2015 10:09 PM ET More from Stewart Bell | @StewartBellNP
Jahanzeb Malik, 33, making an appearance at the Immigration Refugee Board hearing in Toronto on Monday.

Stewart Bell/National Post
Jahanzeb Malik, 33, making an appearance at the Immigration Refugee Board hearing in Toronto on Monday.

TORONTO — Mohammed Aqeeq Ansari stockpiled firearms, made trips to Pakistan to visit a cleric who fought “jihad” in Afghanistan and wrote provocatively about his beliefs on the Internet. His Facebook page showed a Toronto bank tower and the caption: “If I only had a plane.”

In a decision announced Monday, the Immigration & Refugee Board found that Ansari was a member of a terrorist organization and a danger to Canada’s security. It ordered him deported to Pakistan, the country he left when he came to Toronto as an immigrant eight years ago.

Anna Pape, the IRB spokeswoman, confirmed the decision but said a written ruling explaining the reasons was not yet available, although it was expected any day. “This is all the information available at the moment,” she said.

Ansari’s lawyer, Derek Lee, could not be reached for comment.

Stewart Bell/National PostMalik is being held in custody in Lindsay, Ontario

Meanwhile, another Pakistani citizen arrested in Toronto, Jahanzeb Malik, was ordered to remain in custody because of the threat he posed to Canadians. A hearing on whether to deport him for allegedly plotting to bomb the United States consulate in Toronto was to begin Tuesday.

Kash Heed says gang violence in Surrey is not a ‘South Asian’ issue

Former solicitor general says solution to violence is comprehensive approach, not finger pointing

By The Early Edition, CBC News Posted: May 05, 2015 8:14 AM PT Last Updated: May 05, 2015 8:14 AM PT

Kash Heed, a former B.C. solicitor general, is criticizing what he calls an “ethnic approach” to a recent outbreak of violence in Surrey and Delta, B.C., in the past two months.

Police have pointed to “low-level drug dealers” in the South Asian and Somali communities.

“Some people seem to have this bizarre belief that it’s something within the South Asian culture that creates this type of individual when in fact it’s across all groups, regardless of their ethnic background,” Heed, who was an officer with the Vancouver Police Department during another surge in gang violence in the early 2000s, told The Early Edition’s Rick Cluff.

Police have said they are being stonewalled by the families of the victims who are not coming forward with information — something Heed said isn’t surprising.

“You have to remember the individuals who are involved in this dispute are in their 20s. They’re not young kids. They’re not 12 and 13-years-old where the family still has a lot of control on that,” said Heed.

Heed, a former B.C. Liberal MLA, wants to see a comprehensive approach to gang violence — with more funding to build prevention programs for at-risk youth, better supports in schools and crack downs on known offenders.

“Law enforcement officials [need to] take this seriously and put them behind bars and deal with it — but then think long term,” he said.

Former B.C. NDP MLA Moe Sihota has also criticized the focus on the South Asian and Somali communities.

“Surrey has a crime problem that extends through all elements of the community. The Bacon brothers weren’t Somali,” Sihota said in an interview last week.

To hear the full interview with Kash Heed, listen to the audio labelled: Kash Heed on gang violence.