TORONTO: Everton Biddersingh gets life sentence for torturing and killing daughter

Life sentence for man who killed daughter in burning suitcase murder

Everton Biddersingh must serve at least 25 years in prison before he becomes eligible to apply for parole.

Melonie Biddersingh, shown in an undated photo, was murdered by her father, Everton Biddersingh. Her body was found in a burning suitcase 21 years ago.

Melonie Biddersingh

THE CANADIAN PRESS

Melonie Biddersingh, shown in an undated photo, was murdered by her father, Everton Biddersingh. Her body was found in a burning suitcase 21 years ago.

A man who drowned or starved his horrifically abused teenaged daughter to death two decades ago was handed a life sentence Monday, after court heard impact statements from three of the victim’s relatives.

Everton Biddersingh of Toronto, had little to say before Superior Court Justice Al O’Marra handed down the punishment for the “horrible” crime.

Everton Biddersingh, 60, of Toronto, had little to say before Superior Court Justice Al O’Marra handed down the punishment for the “horrible” crime.

“It will make no difference,” Biddersingh mumbled to the court.

A jury last month convicted Biddersingh of first-degree murder in the death of his 17-year-old daughter, Melonie Biddersingh. He will not be eligible for parole for 25 years.

In a written impact statement, the victim’s mother described the devastation she felt after learning in 2012 that her daughter’s charred remains had finally been identified.

“There is nothing — I mean absolutely nothing — Melonie would have ever done that could have led to the dreadful outcome of her murder,” Opal Austin said in the statement read to court.

“So, I am left wondering why for the rest of my life.”

The Crown maintained Biddersingh drowned or starved his daughter after a period of prolonged abuse, or that she died while he confined her in the apartment they shared with her stepmother, Elaine Biddersingh.

The teen, whose burned remains were found stuffed in a suitcase in an isolated industrial area north of Toronto, had come to Canada from Jamaica for a better life. Instead, by the time of her death, she weighed a skeletal 50 pounds and had 21 broken bones in various stages of healing. A piece of a vegetable was found in her vagina.

She had spent countless hours chained to furniture, stuffed in a tiny closet, or locked out on a balcony. Her father, according to one witness, would kick her and force the helpless victim’s head into a toilet and then flush.

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NOVA SCOTIA: Doreze Marvin Beals, 19, charged with human trafficking, sex assault of 15-year-old girl

Doreze Beals testifies at his human trafficking trial

North Preston man, 19, charged with human trafficking, sex assault of 15-year-old girl

By Blair Rhodes, CBC News Posted: Jan 29, 2016 9:14 AM AT Last Updated: Jan 29, 2016 5:29 PM AT

The trial of Doreze Marvin Beals, charged with human trafficking and sex assault of a 15-year-old girl in April 2014, resumed Friday in Nova Scotia Supreme Court.

The trial of Doreze Marvin Beals, charged with human trafficking and sex assault of a 15-year-old girl in April 2014, resumed Friday in Nova Scotia Supreme Court. (CBC)

A Nova Scotia man on trial for human trafficking took the stand in his own defence Friday, testifying the alleged victim was not sexually assaulted and was only hidden in a cellar because she feared her mother.

Doreze Beals, 19, of North Preston is accused of kidnapping a young girl, sexually assaulting her and threatening to force her into prostitution. The charges stem from incidents in North Preston in April 2014.

Child-murderer Stephanie Warren stabbed to death in Jamaica

Mother of abandoned ‘Baby Angelica’ stabbed to death in Jamaica

Father criminally convicted in baby’s near-death in a freezing Toronto stairwell in 2009 stands accused of killing her mother.

Stephanie and Alphonso Warren are pictured in court in 2009.

ALEX TAVSHUNSKY / FOR THE TORONTO STAR

Stephanie and Alphonso Warren are pictured in court in 2009.

The mother of “Baby Angelica,” the infant found abandoned in a Toronto parking garage stairwell in 2008, has been killed in Jamaica. Her husband, who was criminally convicted of abandoning the baby, is in custody, a seemingly violent conclusion to a parenting saga from hell.

With the clock hands approaching midnight and a New Year on the horizon, 39-year-old Stephanie Warren of Toronto, mother to “Baby Angelica,” was stabbed to death — allegedly by her Jamaican husband, Alphonso Warren, according to the Jamaica Constabulary Force.

The couple is infamous for having repeatedly faced allegations of mistreating their children in Canada and abroad. The mummified remains of a later child of the couple, a 2-year-old known as “Baby Joshua,” were found in 2012, zipped inside a suitcase in the Warrens’ inner-city Kingston, Jamaica, home.

Jamaican police were called to the couple’s apartment around 11:20 p.m. this New Year’s Eve to investigate a domestic dispute.

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Laylin Delorme, Colton Steinhauer and a 13-year-old boy charged with 1st-degree murder in Edmonton Mac’s shootings

2 adults, 1 boy charged with 1st-degree murder in Edmonton Mac’s shootings

Ricky Massin Cenabre, 41, Karanpal Bhangu, 35, ID’d as victims in robberies

CBC News Posted: Dec 19, 2015 9:45 AM MT Last Updated: Dec 20, 2015 6:16 AM MT

Three people were charged Saturday with first-degree murder in the killings of two convenience store clerks in Edmonton Friday.

Laylin Delorme, 24, Colton Steinhauer, 27, and a 13-year-old boy who cannot be named are each charged with two counts of first-degree murder, robbery with a prohibited restricted firearm, being disguised with intent and other offences.

All three have criminal records and were prohibited from possessing firearms, police said. The boy had been scheduled to appear in court Friday on unrelated charges.

Police also named the clerk killed at the 61st Avenue Mac’s Convenience store as Ricky Massin Cenabre, 41.

Alta Deadly Holdups 20151218

Karanpal Bhangu, 35, was killed in one of the shootings. He is shown with his son Royce and his wife Kiran in this image from the “GoFundMe” website. (GoFundMe/Canadian Press)

Ricky Cenabre

Ricky Cenabre, 41, was identified Saturday as the victim in the Mac’s shooting at 109th Street. (gofundme.com)

Earlier, police identified Karanpal Bhangu, 35, as the clerk at the Mill Woods store who came to Canada from India just three months ago with his six-year-old son in order to join his wife, who’s been living here for four years.

Alberta Federation of Labour president Gil McGowan says there should be tougher legislation to better protect vulnerable, night-shift retail workers, who are often young people and immigrants.

Alberta Justice Minister Kathleen Ganley says there will be a review of the rules.

Tragedy of ‘golden’ daughter’s fall resonates with Asian immigrants

Straight A student to murderer: Tragedy of ‘golden’ daughter’s fall resonates with Asian immigrants

 | July 27, 2015 | Last Updated: Jul 27 4:54 PM ET
More from Washington Post

Jennifer Pan's  trial, for plotting with hit men to kill her parents, ended in January, and she's serving a long sentence. But the full story of this troubled young woman is just now being told as a complete and powerful narrative by someone who knew her.

For a while, Tragedy of ‘golden’ daughter’s fall resonates with Asian immigrants’s parents regarded her as their “golden” child.

The young Canadian woman, who lived in the city of Markham just north of Toronto, was a straight A student at a Catholic school who won scholarships and early acceptance to college. True to her father’s wishes, she graduated from the University of Toronto’s prestigious pharmacology program and went on to work at a blood-testing lab at SickKids hospital.

Pan’s accomplishments used to make her mother and father, Bich Ha and Huei Hann Pan, brim with pride. After all, they had arrived in Toronto as refugees from Vietnam, working as labourers for an auto parts manufacturer so their two kids could have the bright future that they couldn’t attain for themselves.

But in Pan’s case, that perfect fate was all an elaborate lie. She failed to graduate from high school, let alone the University of Toronto, as she had told her parents. Her trial, for plotting with hit men to kill her parents, ended in January, and she’s serving a long sentence. But the full story of this troubled young woman is just now being told as a complete and powerful narrative by someone who knew her.

A social butterfly with an easy, high-pitched laugh, she mixed with guys, girls, Asians, Caucasians, jocks, nerds, people deep into the arts

In a story published in Toronto Life magazine last week, reporter Karen Ho detailed the intricate web of deception that her high school classmate at Mary Ward Catholic Secondary School in north Scarborough spun to prevent her parents from discovering the unimaginable: that their golden child was, in fact, failing. Using court documents and interviews, Ho pieced together Pan’s descent from a precocious elementary schooler to a chronic liar who forged report cards, scholarship letters and university transcripts — all to preserve an image of perfection. The headline: “Jennifer Pan’s Revenge: the inside story of a golden child, the killers she hired, and the parents she wanted dead.”

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B.C.: Refugee family from Saudi Arabia built notorious family crime empire in Canada

B.C. parents learn hard $170,000 lesson in breeding ‘family crime empire’

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 | June 11, 2015 10:56 PM ET
More from Adrian Humphreys | @AD_Humphreys

The family’s fourth son, Mahmoud Alkhalil, was one of three people killed in a notorious gunfight in 2003 in Vancouver’s Loft Six nightclub.

Nick Procaylo/Postmedia News/Files The family’s fourth son, Mahmoud Alkhalil, was one of three people killed in a notorious gunfight in 2003 in Vancouver’s Loft Six nightclub.

Two of their sons died in gangland shootouts, two others face drug trafficking or murder charges from mob-related incidents, and a fifth is on the run abroad. Now, their parents are learning another hard lesson in breeding a self-made crime group — they’ve lost the $170,000 they posted to have their eldest son released from jail.

Hossein Al Khalil and Soumayya Azzam were fighting in court to salvage bond money paid to have Nabil Alkhalil released. Their bond was lost when he fled Canada on a bogus passport soon after.

The judge’s ruling against them — with Nabil still a fugitive — is but one entry in an unrelenting stream of bad news involving their sons.

Toronto Police Service

Toronto Police Service Rabih Alkhalil is charged in a Vancouver hit and in a shooting at a cafe patio in Toronto’s Little Italy.

These two parents of five sons came to Canada, presumably to make a better life for themselves. Now, having buried two kids before they reached the age of 20, they have two more facing the possibility of a long time in prison,” said Sgt. Lindsey Houghton of B.C.’s Combined Forces Special Enforcement Unit.

“The actions of these boys have destroyed that family.”

The family arrived in Canada from Saudi Arabia as refugees in 1990, although their roots are believed to be in Iran, and settled in Surrey, B.C. After two sons were killed in gangland violence, they moved to Ottawa and Montreal.

“They took all of their organized crime and gang connections with them,” said Houghton.

The couple’s second son had been the first to die.

In 2001, Khalil Alkhalil, 19, was shot dead in Surrey in a gunfight over a drug debt. His killer claimed self-defence and was freed. The shooter’s lawyer was beaten up in court by angry supporters of Alkhalil, and the shooter himself was later gunned down in Kelowna in a case that remains unsolved.

The fourth son, Mahmoud Alkhalil, was one of three people killed in a notorious gunfight in 2003 between gang rivals in Vancouver’s Loft Six nightclub. He made it out of the building, but was found bleeding and unconscious after crashing his car 20 blocks away. When he succumbed to his injuries at age 19, he already had a lengthy criminal record.

The youngest son, Rabih “Robby” Alkhalil, was only two when he came to Canada.