Police searching for two suspects in Toronto ‘gang war’ kidnapping

Police searching for two suspects in Toronto ‘gang war’ kidnapping

Three men and one teen have been charged in connection with the abduction and beating of two 17-year-old gang members

Toronto police say two teenage gang members were kidnapped and tortured in retaliation for a condo shootout.

Police are searching for Lincoln Anthony Richards, 23 and Thai-Shay Gordon, 17, wanted in connection with an Apr. 19 kidnapping and beating.

TORONTO POLICE SERVICE HANDOUT Police are searching for Lincoln Anthony Richards, 23 and Thai-Shay Gordon, 17, wanted in connection with an Apr. 19 kidnapping and beating.

Now three young men have been charged and two more are wanted.

Investigators say that, in the early hours of April 19, members of the Young Buck Killers gang were partying in an Airbnb-rented condo on the 25th floor of a building near Front St. and Blue Jays Way.

The revellers heard that members of a rival gang, the Queens Drive Crips, were going to show up uninvited.

Four Young Bucks went downstairs to look for the gatecrashers.

When they came back upstairs, the Queen Drive Crips were waiting for them in the hallway.

Security footage shows the gang members opening fire as the elevator doors open. Police do not believe anyone was seriously injured in the shootout.

Later on April 19, two 17-year-olds involved with the Queens Drive Crips were kidnapped when they arrived at a Swansea Mews townhouse complex that police say is associated with the Young Buck Killers.

In a news conference Thursday, Staff Inspector Mike Earl said police believe the kidnapping was in retaliation for the condo ambush.

“I wouldn’t call this an ‘innocent stranger’ kidnapping,” Earl said. “This is basically a gang-war kidnapping.”

The two boys were tied to chairs and beaten, threatened with a gun, and forced to play Russian Roulette with a loaded handgun.

At one point a shot was fired on the property.

Police were called to the area twice during this time on reports of suspicious activity, but they were not able to find anything.

After police showed up in the area, the kidnappers moved the boys to locations in the Flemingdon Park and Lawrence Heights neighbourhoods.

Earl said they were tied to chairs again and beaten throughout the day. It is also alleged that they were forced to perform sexual acts.

Ransom demands were made to the boys’ families.

(…)

REGINA: Andrew James Pittman and Min Sun Park charged with trafficking cocaine, meth

Two charged with trafficking cocaine, meth in Regina

CocaineCTV Regina

Published Friday, February 26, 2016 11:20AM CST

A man and a woman are facing charges after Regina police seized a large quantity of cocaine and methamphetamine from a home in the city.

The arrests come after officers carried out a search warrant at a home in the 500 block of University Park Drive on Thursday.

In addition to cocaine and meth, police seized an undisclosed amount of cash.

Andrew James Pittman, 33, and Min Sun Park, 27, both from Regina, each face charges that include drug trafficking and possession of proceeds of crime.

The two accused made their first appearance in provincial court Friday morning.

CALGARY: Six suspects charged in connection with armed home invasion in Citadel

Six suspects charged in connection with armed home invasion in Citadel

Ryan White , Reporter/Producer

Published Friday, February 26, 2016 2:22PM MST
Last Updated Friday, February 26, 2016 2:56PM MST

A Calgary Police Service investigation into a Thursday morning home invasion in the northwest has led to charges against six people.

Early Thursday morning, police were called to a home in the 100 block of Citadel Peak Circle Northwest following reports armed men had gained entry to the residence.

The offenders allegedly tied up the two occupants and seriously assaulted a disabled man in a wheelchair. The suspects fled after removing several items from the home which housed a small marijuana grow-operation.

Marc Wabafiyebazu charged with first-degree murder in double killing in Miami

Canadian diplomat picking up pieces of shattered life as son sentenced in killings

COLIN PERKEL, THE CANADIAN PRESS

FIRST POSTED: | UPDATED:

Marc Wabafiyebazu

Marc Wabafiyebazu charged with first-degree murder in double killing in Miami

Marc Wabafiyebazu, 15, appears in adult criminal court for his arraignment, Monday, April 20, 2015, in Miami. Wabafiyebazu, the son of a Canadian diplomat charged with first-degree murder in a double killing in Miami, is expected to plead guilty to reduced charges Friday. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Walter Michot/The Miami Herald via AP, Pool)
The unease Canada’s top diplomat in Miami was feeling as her car threaded its way to work that bright, warm early morning was becoming more insistent.

Her phone rang.

“Are your kids OK?” a senior official at Canada’s Embassy in Washington was asking.

“And then,” Roxanne Dube says in her French-accented lilt, “I knew something was not correct.”

As she would later discover, local authorities had contacted the U.S. State Department, which had in turn contacted the Canadian Embassy. Her unease turned to alarm as, at the urging of her embassy contact, she directed her driver to a hospital, where she was ushered into a VIP room. Someone handed her a piece of paper with a phone number to call for information. She did.

“I’m afraid I have bad news, I think we should meet,” Det. Rolando Garcia was saying. “And he said: ‘Jean is dead.’ I knew it was true because of the way he pronounced Jean’s name.”

Dube dropped the phone. Her world had imploded that sunny day on March 31, 2015. Dube could barely stagger outside.

Now 53, Dube had arrived from Ottawa with her two teen sons exactly two months earlier to take up her post as Canada’s consul general in Miami. It had been a whirlwind of wrapping up her old job — she had been director general for North America, helping oversee Canada’s consular network in the U.S. and Mexico — finding housing, moving, unpacking, getting the boys settled in school.

TORONTO: Convicted killer Andrew “Burnz” Burnett to be sentenced for 2012 Main St. and Kingston Rd. murder

Convicted killer to be sentenced for 2012 Main St. and Kingston Rd. murder 

8

BY , TORONTO SUN

FIRST POSTED: | UPDATED: 

Andrew Burnett
Andrew Burnett who was convicted of second degree murder is pictured in this handout photo. (Photo courtesy CBC)

TORONTO – Andrew “Burnz” Burnett vowed to go straight nine years ago to survive the gunfire rampant in his Jane-Finch neighbourhood.

Burnett, a violent drug dealer, survived gun violence but never reached his goal.

He’s now a convicted killer serving a life prison sentence after a jury in April found him guilty of second-degree murder for shooting Cory Campbell as part of a twisted love triangle tragedy in September 2012.

The jury rejected Burnett’s account of self-defence. The jury also spurned the prosecution’s theory that the homicide was a planned, deliberate execution by Burnett, helping his pal Jayna Badger eliminate her boyfriend Campbell at her Main St. and Kingston Rd. building.

Campbell believed Burnett and Badger were lovers.

The getaway car driver, Jeramy Henry, 28, was convicted of manslaughter, received a time served sentence of four years and is now free.

Crown attorney Joanne Capozzi implored Justice Anne Molloy to order Burnett to serve 15 to 18 years before he could seek parole. His lawyer Sean Robichaud is asking Molloy to limit parole ineligibility to 10 to 12 years. Molloy will pass sentence on July 23.

B.C.: Refugee family from Saudi Arabia built notorious family crime empire in Canada

B.C. parents learn hard $170,000 lesson in breeding ‘family crime empire’

Republish Reprint

 | June 11, 2015 10:56 PM ET
More from Adrian Humphreys | @AD_Humphreys

The family’s fourth son, Mahmoud Alkhalil, was one of three people killed in a notorious gunfight in 2003 in Vancouver’s Loft Six nightclub.

Nick Procaylo/Postmedia News/Files The family’s fourth son, Mahmoud Alkhalil, was one of three people killed in a notorious gunfight in 2003 in Vancouver’s Loft Six nightclub.

Two of their sons died in gangland shootouts, two others face drug trafficking or murder charges from mob-related incidents, and a fifth is on the run abroad. Now, their parents are learning another hard lesson in breeding a self-made crime group — they’ve lost the $170,000 they posted to have their eldest son released from jail.

Hossein Al Khalil and Soumayya Azzam were fighting in court to salvage bond money paid to have Nabil Alkhalil released. Their bond was lost when he fled Canada on a bogus passport soon after.

The judge’s ruling against them — with Nabil still a fugitive — is but one entry in an unrelenting stream of bad news involving their sons.

Toronto Police Service

Toronto Police Service Rabih Alkhalil is charged in a Vancouver hit and in a shooting at a cafe patio in Toronto’s Little Italy.

These two parents of five sons came to Canada, presumably to make a better life for themselves. Now, having buried two kids before they reached the age of 20, they have two more facing the possibility of a long time in prison,” said Sgt. Lindsey Houghton of B.C.’s Combined Forces Special Enforcement Unit.

“The actions of these boys have destroyed that family.”

The family arrived in Canada from Saudi Arabia as refugees in 1990, although their roots are believed to be in Iran, and settled in Surrey, B.C. After two sons were killed in gangland violence, they moved to Ottawa and Montreal.

“They took all of their organized crime and gang connections with them,” said Houghton.

The couple’s second son had been the first to die.

In 2001, Khalil Alkhalil, 19, was shot dead in Surrey in a gunfight over a drug debt. His killer claimed self-defence and was freed. The shooter’s lawyer was beaten up in court by angry supporters of Alkhalil, and the shooter himself was later gunned down in Kelowna in a case that remains unsolved.

The fourth son, Mahmoud Alkhalil, was one of three people killed in a notorious gunfight in 2003 between gang rivals in Vancouver’s Loft Six nightclub. He made it out of the building, but was found bleeding and unconscious after crashing his car 20 blocks away. When he succumbed to his injuries at age 19, he already had a lengthy criminal record.

The youngest son, Rabih “Robby” Alkhalil, was only two when he came to Canada.