Indo-Canadian women perpetuate gender inequality by practicing female foeticide in Canada

Indo-Canadian women give birth to far more boys than women born in Canada

The implication is that the disproportionate ratios are a result of “sex discrimination fuelled by son preference,” a study says.

 Baldev Mutta (centre), CEO of Brampton's Punjabi Community Health Services, is surrounded by his grand daughter Talon Mutta, 9 (left) and daughter Rakhi Mutta. Mutta is involved in initiatives to celebrate girls born to Indian parents. New research that says there is deficit of more than 4,000 girls to Indian-born parents in Canada, possibly linked to repeated second trimester abortions.BERNARD WEIL / TORONTO STAR Order this photo

Baldev Mutta (centre), CEO of Brampton’s Punjabi Community Health Services, is surrounded by his grand daughter Talon Mutta, 9 (left) and daughter Rakhi Mutta. Mutta is involved in initiatives to celebrate girls born to Indian parents. New research that says there is deficit of more than 4,000 girls to Indian-born parents in Canada, possibly linked to repeated second trimester abortions.

A preference for boys among Indian-born parents may have contributed to a deficit of more than 4,400 girls over two decades in what researchers in a new study are calling Canada’s “missing girls.”

The research, presented in the Canadian Medical Association Journal and the online CMAJ Open, looks at more than 6 million births in Canada and reveals that a greater presence of boys among Indian-born mothers may in part be linked to abortions in the second trimester, when parents can learn the baby’s sex.

The birth data was compiled from databases administered by Statistics Canada and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences in Toronto between 1990 and 2011, and 1993 to 2012, respectively.

“The main implication is that among some immigrant communities, males are placed at a higher value than females. This is not just about abortions, it is about gender equality,” said lead author Marcelo Urquia of St. Michael’s Hospital. “I hope that this is conducive to a respectful debate on the value of girls and women in today’s Canadian society.”

His study newly exposes a relationship between induced abortions and the previously reported large numbers of boys among Ontario’s Indian community, said Urquia, noting the data likely explains an imbalance in the rest of Canada too. Some of the “deficit” of girls may be due to “implantation of male embryos,” said Urquia, but the data is insufficient.

While the natural odds of having a boy over a girl are slightly higher, they are consistent across the globe: up to 107 boys for every 100 girls. But Indian-born mothers living in Canada with two children had 138 boys for every 100 girls. In Ontario, that number inflated even more among Indian-born women with two daughters, who then gave birth to 196 boys for every 100 girls.

After abortions, the numbers rise dramatically: 326 boys after one abortion, 409 boys after multiple abortions, and 663 boys for every 100 girls following multiple abortions in the second trimester, when doctors can determine the sex of the fetus.

Miscarriages, or spontaneous abortions, were not linked to the births of more boys, the study found.

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Disproportionate abortion of female fetuses, another sign of Canada’s changing demographics

Female feticide: is it happening in Ontario?

Jennifer Yang Staff Reporter

A new study released Monday provides a first look at whether women from certain ethnic communities are practising sex-selective abortion in Ontario — and found “concerning trends” to suggest female feticide is happening.

Researchers caution, however, that the study is inconclusive and far more investigation needs to be done.

The St. Michael’s Hospital study analyzed 766,688 births in Ontario and found mothers born in South Korea and India were “significantly” more likely to have boys for their second child.

When it came to having a third child, the male-to-female ratio grew even more skewed for Indian-born mothers, who had 136 boys for every 100 girls.

By comparison, the ratio for Canadian-born mothers was 105 boys for every 100 girls — regardless of whether it was their first, second or third-born.

“Our findings raise the possibility that couples originating from India may be more likely than Canadian-born couples to use prenatal sex determination and terminate a second or subsequent pregnancy if the fetus is female,” reads the study, published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

Dr. Rajendra Kale states female feticide a bigger problem in Canada than people want to admit

Dr. Rajendra Kale states female feticide a bigger problem in Canada than people want to admit

Doctor defends controversial fetus gender report

By Karen Seidman, The Gazette January 18, 2012

MONTREAL – Say it isn’t so.

That seemed to be the reaction across the country to a suggestion in an influential Canadian medical journal that enough women here of South-East Asian origin abort unwanted girls that something ought to be done about it.

While doctors across the country questioned the validity of an editorial in the Canadian Medical Association Journal suggesting doctors delay revealing a fetus’s sex until 30 weeks to prevent sex-selective abortions, the author defended his position on Tuesday and said the controversial practice is a bigger problem in Canada than people want to admit.

“The numbers may look small but they were big enough to skew some ratios – and it’s not easy to skew ratios,” said Dr. Rajendra Kale, interim editor-in-chief of CMAJ. “I’m not against educational intervention, but the thing that will put the brakes on this is this recommendation.”

Habits brought by Asian and South-Asian immigrants: Female feticide

In India and China, a cultural and often religious preference for boys has led to the estimated destruction of millions of females in the womb.

Withholding sex of fetus could curb ‘female feticide’ in Canada: doctor

SHERYL UBELACKER Toronto— The Canadian Press
Published Monday, Jan. 16, 2012 12:45PM EST
Last updated Monday, Jan. 16, 2012 4:28PM EST

Dr. Rajendra Kale calls it the most severe and repugnant form of discrimination against females — and he wants to see it stopped.

The practice of aborting a female fetus after the parents learn the sex of their developing child through ultrasound is not as widespread in Canada as in such countries as India and China, where a cultural and often religious preference for boys has led to the estimated destruction of millions of females in the womb.