VAUGHAN, Ont.: Dark-skinned man wanted after deadly shooting at Vaughan cafe

Police release new images of suspect in Vaughan cafe shooting

By  Web Writer  Global News

New images of a suspect in a deadly shooting at a Vaughan, Ont., cafe on June 24, 2015 have been released.

New images of a suspect in a deadly shooting at a Vaughan, Ont., cafe on June 24, 2015 have been released.

York Regional Police handout / Global News

TORONTO — New images of a man wanted after a deadly shooting at a Vaughan cafe have been released by police.

The brazen attack Wednesday morning at Moka Cafe, near Islington Avenue and Highway 7, left two people dead and two others wounded. One person remains in critical condition.

Maria Voci, 47, and Christopher De Simone, 24, both from Vaughan, were pronounced dead at the scene. Autopsies on the victims confirmed both died of the gunshot wounds sustained in the attack.

READ MORE: Police seek witnesses after 2 dead, 2 injured in Vaughan café shooting

Voci was a mother of three and worked at the cafe. One of the men who was injured in the attack was Rocco Di Paola, a businessman who was a Toronto mayoral candidate in last year’s election.

Police issue arrest warrant for Muhab Sultanaly Sultan in shooting death of Jeremy Cook

Police issue arrest warrant for Calgary man in slaying of Ontario teen

By Staff The Canadian Press
June 19, 2015 9:13 pm
Updated: June 19, 2015 9:33 pm
Muhab Sultanaly Sultan, 23, of Calgary is wanted for second-degree murder in connection with Jeremy Cook's shooting death last Sunday.

Muhab Sultanaly Sultan, 23, of Calgary is wanted for second-degree murder in connection with Jeremy Cook’s shooting death last Sunday.

London Police Services

LONDON, Ont. – An arrest warrant has been issued for an Alberta man in the death of an Ontario teen who police say died while trying to get his cellphone back.

Police in London, Ont., say 23-year-old Muhab Sultanaly Sultan of Calgary is wanted for second-degree murder in last weekend’s slaying of Jeremy Cook.

READ MORE: Teen fatally shot in London, Ont. after tracking lost cellphone

Cook left his phone in a taxi but used an app to track the device to an address in London’s north end.

Police have said when he and a relative arrived at the location early Sunday morning the app indicated the phone was in a nearby car with three men inside.

WATCH: All Jeremy Cook wanted was to find his lost cell phone. But when the 18 -year-old London, Ontario teen tracked it down, it ended with him losing his life. Cindy Pom has the details.

TORONTO: Convicted killer Andrew “Burnz” Burnett to be sentenced for 2012 Main St. and Kingston Rd. murder

Convicted killer to be sentenced for 2012 Main St. and Kingston Rd. murder 

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BY , TORONTO SUN

FIRST POSTED: | UPDATED: 

Andrew Burnett
Andrew Burnett who was convicted of second degree murder is pictured in this handout photo. (Photo courtesy CBC)

TORONTO - Andrew “Burnz” Burnett vowed to go straight nine years ago to survive the gunfire rampant in his Jane-Finch neighbourhood.

Burnett, a violent drug dealer, survived gun violence but never reached his goal.

He’s now a convicted killer serving a life prison sentence after a jury in April found him guilty of second-degree murder for shooting Cory Campbell as part of a twisted love triangle tragedy in September 2012.

The jury rejected Burnett’s account of self-defence. The jury also spurned the prosecution’s theory that the homicide was a planned, deliberate execution by Burnett, helping his pal Jayna Badger eliminate her boyfriend Campbell at her Main St. and Kingston Rd. building.

Campbell believed Burnett and Badger were lovers.

The getaway car driver, Jeramy Henry, 28, was convicted of manslaughter, received a time served sentence of four years and is now free.

Crown attorney Joanne Capozzi implored Justice Anne Molloy to order Burnett to serve 15 to 18 years before he could seek parole. His lawyer Sean Robichaud is asking Molloy to limit parole ineligibility to 10 to 12 years. Molloy will pass sentence on July 23.

B.C.: Refugee family from Saudi Arabia built notorious family crime empire in Canada

B.C. parents learn hard $170,000 lesson in breeding ‘family crime empire’

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 | June 11, 2015 10:56 PM ET
More from Adrian Humphreys | @AD_Humphreys

The family’s fourth son, Mahmoud Alkhalil, was one of three people killed in a notorious gunfight in 2003 in Vancouver’s Loft Six nightclub.

Nick Procaylo/Postmedia News/Files The family’s fourth son, Mahmoud Alkhalil, was one of three people killed in a notorious gunfight in 2003 in Vancouver’s Loft Six nightclub.

Two of their sons died in gangland shootouts, two others face drug trafficking or murder charges from mob-related incidents, and a fifth is on the run abroad. Now, their parents are learning another hard lesson in breeding a self-made crime group — they’ve lost the $170,000 they posted to have their eldest son released from jail.

Hossein Al Khalil and Soumayya Azzam were fighting in court to salvage bond money paid to have Nabil Alkhalil released. Their bond was lost when he fled Canada on a bogus passport soon after.

The judge’s ruling against them — with Nabil still a fugitive — is but one entry in an unrelenting stream of bad news involving their sons.

Toronto Police Service

Toronto Police Service Rabih Alkhalil is charged in a Vancouver hit and in a shooting at a cafe patio in Toronto’s Little Italy.

These two parents of five sons came to Canada, presumably to make a better life for themselves. Now, having buried two kids before they reached the age of 20, they have two more facing the possibility of a long time in prison,” said Sgt. Lindsey Houghton of B.C.’s Combined Forces Special Enforcement Unit.

“The actions of these boys have destroyed that family.”

The family arrived in Canada from Saudi Arabia as refugees in 1990, although their roots are believed to be in Iran, and settled in Surrey, B.C. After two sons were killed in gangland violence, they moved to Ottawa and Montreal.

“They took all of their organized crime and gang connections with them,” said Houghton.

The couple’s second son had been the first to die.

In 2001, Khalil Alkhalil, 19, was shot dead in Surrey in a gunfight over a drug debt. His killer claimed self-defence and was freed. The shooter’s lawyer was beaten up in court by angry supporters of Alkhalil, and the shooter himself was later gunned down in Kelowna in a case that remains unsolved.

The fourth son, Mahmoud Alkhalil, was one of three people killed in a notorious gunfight in 2003 between gang rivals in Vancouver’s Loft Six nightclub. He made it out of the building, but was found bleeding and unconscious after crashing his car 20 blocks away. When he succumbed to his injuries at age 19, he already had a lengthy criminal record.

The youngest son, Rabih “Robby” Alkhalil, was only two when he came to Canada.

TORONTO: Mark Moore found guilty of four counts of first-degree murder in 2010 shooting deaths of Jahmeel Spence, Mike James, Courthney Facey and Carl Cole

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Sean Davidson, CTV Toronto
Published Saturday, May 30, 2015 6:04PM EDT
Last Updated Saturday, May 30, 2015 6:31PM EDT

An aspiring Toronto rapper has been found guilty of four counts of first-degree murder in the 2010 shooting deaths of four men.

Mark Moore pleaded not guilty to all four of the murders, which took place over a span of 75 days in the fall of 2010.

Moore has been sentenced to life in prison with no chance of parole for 25 years.

Mark Garfield Moore appears in this undated image taken from a YouTube video.

The jury came back with their verdict around 6 p.m. Saturday.

Moore is convicted of first-degree murder in the shooting deaths of Jahmeel Spence, Mike James, Courthney Facey and Carl Cole.

Two of those killings were witnessed by a friend of Moore, who provided key testimony at the trial.

Moore is currently serving a 12-year sentence for a violent Toronto robbery.

More to come.

SURREY, B.C. :Mayor Linda Hepner delivers condolences to family of street-level drug dealer Arun Bains

Keven Drews, The Canadian Press
Published Monday, April 20, 2015 5:29PM EDT
Last Updated Monday, April 20, 2015 10:28PM EDT

SURREY, B.C. — The mayor of a Metro Vancouver city plagued by a gang war has implored those shooting at each other to stop before more people are killed, adding police will get the necessary resources to deal with the violence.

Surrey Mayor Linda Hepner was flanked by the area’s top officers Monday as politicians and police presented a united front against the suspects behind 22 shootings since March 9 in that city and in neighbouring Delta.

The latest victim was shot a day earlier and identified Monday by provincial NDP Leader John Horgan as the nephew of Harry Bains, one of the party’s members of the legislature, whose riding is in Surrey.

Chief Superintendent Bill Fordy, left, Surrey Mayor Linda Hepner, centre, and Assistant Commissioner Dan Malow address the recent spate of shootings in Surrey, B.C. at a news conference on Monday, April 20, 2015. (Keven Drews / THE CANADIAN PRESS)

Condolences to the family of 22-year-old Arun Bains were the first thing Hepner delivered at the news conference.

“This has to stop before any more lives are lost,” she said. “I am imploring those that have been involved in these shootings to take a sober look at the grim reality of your action.

“While you may have been fortunate to escape any serious injury to date, what happened yesterday is a fate that can easily befall you.”

Police were called to reports of gunfire early Sunday and found Bains inside a vehicle that had crashed into a pole.

Mounties have said Bains was known to be connected to the street-level drug trade and became the first person to lose his life since the shootings began six weeks ago.

RCMP assistant commissioner Dan Malo said groups of individuals who want to violently take over profits from the drug trade and target vulnerable people are involved.