Protesters call Bill C-51 “act of terror”

NDP Leader Tom Mulcair, Green Party Leader Elizabeth May join protests in Montreal, Toronto

By Kady O’Malley, CBC News Posted: Mar 14, 2015 5:00 AM ET Last Updated: Mar 14, 2015 5:15 PM ET

Protests are underway across Canada against the government’s proposed anti-terrorism legislation, which would give police much broader powers and allow them to detain terror suspects and give new powers to Canada’s spy agency.

NDP leader Tom Mulcair joined hundreds In Montreal in a march through the city. One protester held up a poster saying “C-51 is an act of terror,” while others carried red “Stop Harper” signs.

The protest was expected to end in front of the riding office ofLiberal Leader Justin Trudeau. Trudeau has said his caucus will vote in favour of the bill.

NDP MPs Craig Scott and Linda Duncan were part of the crowd gathered outside Canada Place in downtown Edmonton. Some placards called the bill “criminalization of dissent” and warned “big brother is watching you.”

Protesters said they are worried the bill will be used to harass or silence critics of government’s environmental and aboriginal policies. 

Pakistani Jahanzeb Malik accused of planning to bomb U.S. Consulate and other buildings in downtown Toronto

Showed ISIS beheading videos to undercover RCMP officer, CBSA alleges

CBC News Posted: Mar 11, 2015 1:53 PM ET Last Updated: Mar 11, 2015 9:40 PM ET

Canadian security officials are moving to deport to Pakistan Jahanzeb Malik, who they allege was planning to bomb the U.S. Consulate and other buildings in downtown Toronto. (Evan Mitsui/CBC)

A Pakistani man planned to use remote-controlled bombs to blow up the U.S. Consulate and other buildings in Toronto’s financial district, authorities said on Wednesday.

Jahanzeb Malik, 33, was arrested on Monday following a lengthy investigation by security and anti-terrorism personnel, said the Canada Border Services Agency. He has not been charged and the allegations have not been proven.

Malik was ordered held in custody on “security grounds” pending deportation following an Immigration and Refugee Board hearing on Wednesday. He appeared via video link from Lindsay, Ont.

OTTAWA: Two men charged in beating of terrorism suspect Carlos Larmond

Update: Two charged in beating of alleged terror twin at Ottawa jail

Published on: March 11, 2015
Last Updated: March 11, 2015 2:10 PM EDT

Carlos Larmond was badly beaten at the Ottawa jail.

Two men have been charged with assault causing bodily assault in connection with the savage beating last week of Ottawa terrorism suspect Carlos Larmond, 24, at the Innes Road jail.

The accused were identified as Michael Clarke and Terrence Wilson.

Larmond, who was arrested in January with twin brother, ‎Ashton, was jumped by two white inmates last Tuesday right before lunch. The terrorism suspect didn’t throw a single punch during the surprise attack. He kept his arms up in a defensive position as the two inmates repeatedly punched him.

The attack, captured on video, left the accused terrorist with a broken left arm, a fractured left orbital bone and substantial head injuries.

Larmond was transported to the Civic Hospital under guard and later escorted back to jail.

The attack remains under investigation by Ottawa Police Service detectives.

MONTREAL: Adil Charkaoui linked to 2nd suspected radicalized youth

Muslim leader denies involvement with departure of 2 young men to Mideast

CBC News Posted: Mar 06, 2015 9:42 PM ET Last Updated: Mar 06, 2015 9:42 PM ET

Adil Charkaoui denies encouraging young Quebecers to travel overseas to fight with jihadists and says he has been the victim of a smear campaign. Adil Charkaoui denies encouraging young Quebecers to travel overseas to fight with jihadists and says he has been the victim of a smear campaign. (Radio-Canada)

At least two of the six young Quebecers who left Canada for Istanbul, suspected of heading to Syria to fight with jihadists, were acquainted with well-known Quebec Muslim leader Adil Charkaoui.

One of the six attended a protest against the proposed Charter of Quebec Values in September 2013, where Charkaoui was seen speaking into his ear more than once. At the time, the young man was in contact with the Quebec Collective Against Islamophobia.

Charkaoui acknowledges he spoke to the man, but told Radio-Canada that he spoke to many people who volunteered with him and said he’s the victim of a smear campaign.

The young man also attended the east-end Montreal Islamic community centre where Charkaoui was a leader.

“This young man came to the centre like other people and participated in activities like other people, like thousands of young people who come to the centre,” said Charkaoui.

Earlier this week, the parents of a second man who left the country confirmed he took a course with Charkaoui.

‘No imminent threat’ to West Edmonton Mall, RCMP say

Andrea Janus and Michael Shulman, CTVNews.ca
Published Sunday, February 22, 2015 8:48AM EST
Last Updated Sunday, February 22, 2015 10:15PM EST

City police said there is “no imminent threat to Edmonton” after al-Shabab released a propaganda video on Sunday calling on Muslim fighters to launch attacks and named Canada’s West Edmonton Mall as a potential target.

At a news conference Sunday afternoon, police said they are working closely with mall security and sharing information with the RCMP after the al Qaeda-linked rebel group in Somalia issued a video that urged attacks on shopping malls in the United States, Canada and Europe.

Al-Shabab was behind a 2013 shopping mall attack in Nairobi in which 67 people were killed.

Al-Shabab has released a video making threats against Canada, Britain and the U.S.

Edmonton Deputy Police Chief Brian Simpson said police are taking the issue seriously, but they have not identified a “specific threat.”

“I have to emphasize I feel West Edmonton mall is very safe, I also feel that this community is very safe,” he added.

Toronto imam Hamid Slimi calls for Ottawa to stop linking Islam and terrorism

End to the war of words: Toronto imam calls for Ottawa to stop linking Islam and terrorism

 | February 21, 2015 4:25 PM ET
Dr. Hamid Slimi, centre, chairman of the Muslim seminary, the Canadian Centre for Deen Studies, called on the federal government to stop using language linking Islam to terror at a conference last week in Toronto.

DR. HAMID SLIMI Dr. Hamid Slimi, centre, chairman of the Muslim seminary, the Canadian Centre for Deen Studies, called on the federal government to stop using language linking Islam to terror at a conference last week in Toronto.

At a conference to combat radicalization held last week in Toronto, a prominent local imam called on the federal government to stop using language linking Islam to terror.

“Lead by example, change the rhetoric, and stop saying these words. They hurt,” said Dr. Hamid Slimi, former chairman of the Canadian Council of Imams and current chairman of the Muslim seminary, the Canadian Centre for Deen Studies.

The plea, met with overwhelming applause, referred specifically to remarks made by Prime Minister Stephen Harper weeks before that characterized mosques as potential spaces of radicalization.

Several days later, U.S. President Barack Obama, whose government has refused to use words such as “Islamic” or “jihad” to characterize violent extremism, found himself under fire for taking the opposite side of the semantic battle.

“What’s wrong with this man that he can’t stand up and say there’s a part of Islam that’s sick?” former New York Mayor Rudi Giuliani reportedly said, after the president defended his government’s position this week at a White House summit on combating extremism.

“We are not at war with Islam,” Mr. Obama said. “We are at war with people who have perverted Islam.”