Category Archives: Family reunification/Sponsorship

TORONTO: Refugee from Burma ends up working for the Karen community

From there to here: Burmese refugee loves Canada’s respect for human rights
For Mie Tha Lah, part of the persecuted Karen minority in Burma, Canada’s respect for human rights is one of his adopted home’s best features.

Mie Tha Lah, a 37-year-old refugee from Burma, now known as Myanmar, is a youth worker for the Jane/ Finch Community and Family Centre. When he arrived in Canada and saw the CN Tower he knew his dream for freedom was complete.

DEBRA BLACK / TORONTO STAR Order this photo

By: Debra Black Immigration Reporter, Published on Thu Jan 30 2014

More than 240,000 immigrants are expected to arrive in Canada this year. Many will settle in the GTA. For some, their dreams may take years to build. For others, those dreams may never materialize.
To explore that experience, the Star is publishing an occasional series in the words of newcomers, both recent and more established. If you would like to tell your story, email dzblack@thestar.ca
Mie Tha Lah, a 37-year-old Burmese refugee, came to Canada in 2007 after the country’s doors were opened to members of the minority Karen community, who had been targeted by the government. Lah now works as a settlement worker with the Jane/Finch Community and Family Centre and is an accredited court interpreter.
Before coming to Canada with his wife, originally from the Philippines, his parents and siblings, he spent about 13 years in a refugee camp on the border between Thailand and Burma. While there, Lah received a scholarship to attend a Catholic university in the Philippines, where he studied education. Continue reading

CALGARY: Anya Sass desperate to bring her Syrian husband to Canada

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/ottawa-blocks-canadian-from-getting-syrian-husband-out-of-danger-1.2772266
GO PUBLIC

Ottawa blocks Canadian from getting Syrian husband out of danger

Woman from Calgary forced to choose: Leave him there or risk her life and stay

By Kathy Tomlinson, CBC News Posted: Sep 22, 2014 3:00 AM MT Last Updated: Sep 22, 2014 6:17 AM MT

Ottawa blocks Canadian from getting husband out of Syria

Ottawa blocks Canadian from getting husband out of Syria

A Canadian woman and her Syrian husband are speaking out from a Damascus suburb because they’re frightened and desperate to flee the escalating danger together. They’re distraught because her government is doing nothing to help.

“All we want to do is leave here. We want to just go to Canada and have a normal life,” said Anya Sass, who was born and raised in Calgary.

“We are living in fear every day … I feel like it’s not being taken seriously. They are just saying, ‘Sorry you are in a war zone — but that’s too bad. We have a lot of paperwork to do.’”

Sass said she was travelling through the Middle East three years ago, on a break from post-secondary studies, when she met Habib Alibrahim, fell in love, and married him.

(…)

“I never made it further than Syria,” she said, with a smile. “It’s not easy living here right now — but it’s actually a lot harder to be away from him.” Continue reading

TORONTO: Syrian Kurd claims Canadian officials “don’t care about Syrians”

Canada missed the deadline to reunite a Syrian family, so Sweden stepped in

Mike Wise of North York sold his home to get his mother and younger sister close to Canada. But federal foot-dragging meant they ended up in Sweden.

By: Peter Goodspeed Special to the Star, Published on Fri Sep 19 2014

Mike Wise sold his Toronto home two years ago to rescue his mother in war-torn Syria. He thought he had bought her freedom when she and Wise’s younger sister arrived in Cuba, just a three and a half hour flight from Toronto.

What he didn’t count on was Canada’s reluctance to offer sanctuary to Syrian war refugees.

Despite Wise’s five months of intense lobbying and appeals to senior cabinet ministers, officials refused to expedite his request to have his ailing, widowed mother, Shazia Khail Rashid, 66, and his sister, Sivin, 30, join him and three other brothers in Canada.

Instead, officials with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees had to call on Sweden to rescue Wise’s family.

Now, a once close family is scattered around the world.

In March 2012, Wise, a Syrian Kurd called Mustafa Arab before he legally changed his name last year, was chairman of the GTA branch of the newly formed Syrian Canadian Council. He regularly led protests in Toronto against the blood-stained regime of Syrian President Bashar Assad.

As similar protests in Syria descended into civil war, Wise regularly telephoned his mother and sister in the country’s largest city, Aleppo, to make sure they were safe.

During one call in April 2012, he knew he had to act quickly to rescue them.

(…)

At the time, Cuba had one of the few embassies still functioning in Syria, and Wise managed to find a go-between who arranged to get his mother and sister Cuban tourist visas — for a total of $12,000. Continue reading

Domestic violence acceptable reason to keep Mexican woman in Canada

Mexican woman in Montreal facing deportation to remain in Canada

CBCCBC – Sun, 24 Aug, 2014

(…)

Citizenship and Immigration Canada has stayed Sheila Sedinger Ayala’s removal order.

“It feels amazing,” Sedinger Ayala told CBC news. “Now I can concentrate on celebrating my daughter’s birthday which is this Saturday, the day I was going to be deported.”

Sedinger Ayala, 27, was initially ordered to be deported back to Mexico after her refugee claim sponsor  — her husband — was convicted of a criminal offence.

Her two Canadian-born children would  have stayed behind in Canada if the deportation went ahead.

(…)

The decision comes one day after an immigrant rights group hosted a news conference for Sedinger Ayala on Sunday.

With her fiancé by her side, Sedinger Ayala sobbed while she explained what had happened to her and why she should be granted temporary residency to allow her to stay in Canada while she sorts out her affairs.

Sedinger Ayala said she moved to Montreal from Mexico City in 2005, fleeing from a violent ex-boyfriend.

She had one child within a year of arriving in Canada — a product of gang rape while in Mexico, said Sedinger Ayala’s lawyer Angela Potvin.

She later met and married a man in Montreal with whom she had another child. She said he sponsored her bid for permanent residency and in 2008, the federal and provincial governments accepted her sponsorship application.

However, Potvin said the sponsor was found guilty of physical assault during the course of Sedinger Ayala’s sponsorship application, which in turn made him ineligible to sponsor her. She said the conviction cancelled her permanent residency bid.

Filipino to-be-deported nanny remains in Canada on humanitarian grounds

Nanny spared deportation with reprieve from immigration ministerLilia Ordinario Joaquin, a live-in caregiver facing deportation for “working without authorization,” is granted exemption to proceed with immigration application.

By:  Immigration reporter, Published on Fri Aug 22 2014

Lilia Ordinario Joaquin, who worked under the table as a nanny while waiting for her immigration papers, celebrates after learning that Ottawa has exempted her from deportation.

Joaquin’s deportation exemption comes after a Star story detailed how the 52-year-old mother of five felt forced to work under the table while waiting for a work permit amid an immigration backlog.

Wednesday’s letter from Citizenship and Immigration Canada said she did meet the eligibility requirements to apply for permanent resident status under the live-in caregiver program.

“Humanitarian and compassionate factors were assessed for the purpose of determining whether to grant an exemption from certain legislative requirements to allow your application for permanent residence to be processed,” said the two-page letter. Continue reading

TORONTO: Entire Cuban family gets sponsored, CIC expected to take measures

Wife fights to keep sponsored hubby’s family out of Canada

michele-mandel

BY  ,TORONTO SUN

FIRST POSTED: 

TORONTO — Deborah Parsons thought she had secured love and a happy future when she sponsored her new Cuban husband to Canada nine years ago.

Instead, she brought home violence, debt and a now-convicted domestic abuser intent on bringing the rest of his family to his new country. And despite her repeated warnings to the immigration department about her husband’s past since coming to Canada, they won’t tell her what they are doing to ensure members of his family are not allowed to come here as well.

“Now that the veil of control and abuse has lifted, my hindsight has become quite clear,” Parsons, 45, wrote in a letter to Citizenship and Immigration Minister Chris Alexander. “I was only used for sponsorship, then required to be the bread winner, a maid, a chef, a laundress, a secretary, an employment agency and a charity organization.” Continue reading

MONTREAL: 78-old Julia Hidalgo-Aguilera wants to keep her to-be-deported son in Canada as primary caregiver

Ailing Montreal mother pleads for delay in son’s deportation

Mother and son plead for immigration leniencyHector Reyes-Hidalgo came to Canada four years ago to care for his ailing mother, Julia Hidalgo-Aguilera, who has ALS. But Hector is facing deportation to his native Chile if Immigration Canada doesn’t grant him a reprieve.
CTV Montreal
Published Sunday, July 27, 2014 6:28PM EDT
Last Updated Sunday, July 27, 2014 6:57PM EDT

It’s a desperate plea to Immigration Canada from a woman dying of ALS and her son.

Julia Hidalgo-Aguilera, 78, has lost most of the use of her legs and says her arms are growing weaker.

Her son Hector Reyes-Hidalgo came from Chile four years ago to care for her.

He’s her only family member in Canada and her primary caregiver, but he is set to be deported back to his home country Tuesday.

They’re making an appeal on compassionate grounds to delay his deportation next week.

Even the most basic tasks are almost impossible for Hidalgo-Aguilera — she has difficulty swallowing, moving and sometimes breathing.

Immigration Canada accepted a request for Hidalgo-Aguilera to sponsor her son’s immigration, but Reyes-Hidalgo was rejected in his bid to obtain a Quebec Selection Certificate, which he needs if he wants to live in Quebec.

So next week, he faces deportation.

“I’m thinking of my mother more than of me. I’m hoping for a solution soon,” he said.

Reyes-Hidalgo can contest Immigration Quebec’s decision in October, but without a stay of deportation from Immigration Canada, he won’t have a chance to plead his case.

That could prove to be devastating for his mother physically, emotionally and financially.

“I help pay the rent and pay a lot of things to maintain the house,” he said.

Letters of support have been written by doctors and politicians, including the leader of the official opposition Thomas Mulcair.

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Read more: http://montreal.ctvnews.ca/ailing-montreal-mother-pleads-for-delay-in-son-s-deportation-1.1934471#ixzz38izfKlKW

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http://www.cpa.ca/cpasite/userfiles/documents/practice_page/burden_neuro_diseases_en.pdf

http://www.als.ca/sites/default/files/files/HealthcareProviders/Guide%20to%20ALS%20Patient%20Care.pdf

http://www.neurology.org/cgi/content/meeting_abstract/80/1_MeetingAbstracts/P07.065

 

Ottawa doubles time processing immigration applications for foreign spouses already living in Canada

(Photo Contributed) Aussie Carmen Ostrander, who married Brendan Ostrander, needs 100 practice hours by December to get her art therapy licence, but doesn’t have a work permit.

Ottawa has doubled the time it takes to process immigration applications for foreign spouses already living in Canada, prompting fear that the “inland sponsorship program” would eventually be eliminated.

Currently, Canada allows a foreign national married to a Canadian to apply for sponsorship in the country if they are already here legally with valid temporary status.

They can also go back to their home countries and apply from there, but most couples prefer the in-Canada route so the Canadian spouses don’t have to give up their jobs and careers or be separated from their wives or husbands for years while an application is in process overseas. Continue reading

Permanent resident files prioritized

Foreign service job action threatens Canada’s annual immigration target

The number of immigrant visas granted from this summer dropped 7.5 per cent, while temporary visitor visas were up 11 per cent.

STEPHAN POTOPNYK PHOTO

Sarah Hedley applied in November to sponsor her British husband, Christopher Hedley, as a permanent resident from within Canada. She said the expected processing time for the first stage of the application has been extended to 10 months from six months.

By:  Immigration reporter, Published on Tue Sep 10 2013
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Permanent residency applicants appear to be taking the biggest hit from ongoing job action by foreign affairs officers, prompting concerns about whether Ottawa’s 2013 immigration target can be met. Continue reading

Brampton, Ont.: Federick Gayle and Elizabeth Gayle guilty of first-degree murder in death of 15-year-old daughter Tiffany Gayle

 

Murderer Elizabeth Gayle

Ontario parents found guilty in grisly murder of teen Tiffany Gayle
By Matthew Coutts | Daily Brew – 17 hours ago

A court sketch shows murder victim Tiffany Gayle’s parents, Federick, and stepmother Elizabeth Gayle. She came to Canada to be with her family,
but there is little indication that she found a home here, not even for a moment.

Tiffany Gayle, a 15-year-old girl who moved to Brampton, Ont., from Jamaica, was found dead in June 2010, beaten and left in a bloody bathtub just 17 months after coming to Canada to live with her father and stepmother. Continue reading

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