Category Archives: Language shift

MONTREAL: Immigrants from France invading the city

Montreal’s French invasion: Why immigrants from France are moving in en masse

BENJAMIN SHINGLER

MONTREAL — The Canadian Press

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Last updated 

When Christian Faure moved to Montreal last summer, the renowned chef saw a chance to start fresh in a new city, freed from the constraints of his native France.

Faure opened a pastry shop and cooking school in a renovated 300-year-old greystone on a busy street in Old Montreal.

“It would be totally impossible to open a similar patisserie in a historic quarter in Paris and Lyon,” said Faure, who had a stint as director of the Cordon Bleu chef school in Ottawa before moving to the city. “In Montreal, it’s still possible. It’s a city of arts and theatre, and it encourages young people.”

Faure isn’t alone. Faced with a slumping economy and high unemployment rate back home, the number of French citizens in Montreal has soared in recent years, particularly among the 25-40 age demographic.

These days, the unmistakable accent of the Old Country echoes through the bars and cafés of the city’s trendy Plateau district. Specialty stores offering made-in-France delicacies and pubs that televise French rugby and soccer matches have also recently popped up.

By 2013, nearly 55,000 French citizens were registered at the French consulate in Montreal, up by about 45 per cent from 2005, according to the consulate.

In reality, that number is likely much higher.

A consulate spokesman estimates only about half of the French in Canada register, putting the estimated number of French citizens in Montreal at about 110,000. Toronto and Quebec City are the next most popular destinations, each home to about 10,000 registered French citizens.

The growing French presence in Montreal has even stirred up hints of resentment.

A satirical song called Y’a trop de Français sur le Plateau, which takes jabs at the perceived snobbiness of the French and their love of cigarettes, has been viewed 143,000 times on YouTube. The tune was written by Fred Fresh, a musician who himself hails from France.

Still, many view Montreal as a place of opportunity.

Laure Juilliard moved from Paris seven years ago. Only 22 at the time, she completed a one-year technical program, found a job three weeks later and has lived here ever since.

“There was a sense of freedom – from family, and from France, which is much more traditional and hierarchical,” said Juilliard, now a freelance writer who runs the popular lifestyle blog Une Parisienne à Montréal.

“I felt you could be much more yourself here than in France, and not feel the judgment of others, and even if there is judgment, it’s not necessarily negative.”

It’s unclear how many of these new arrivals will stay for the long haul.

Over the past decade, 30,000 immigrants from France have gained permanent resident status in Quebec, according to the consulate, far below the total number here on temporary student and work-travel visas. But it’s still among the top immigrant countries of origin in Quebec, alongside Algeria, Morocco, China and Haiti.

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SFU student claims European Canada is a fiction

LABOVE: Holding tight to fiction of a European CanadaJOSH LABOVE / NORTH SHORE NEWS  JULY 20, 2014 12:00 AM

Xenophobe Brad Saltzberg has been on a bit of a media tear lately, as spokesperson for what can only be called a hate group for modern times, Putting Canada First.

Saltzberg and his cronies are largely dismissed by city councils and mainstream news media, but I would argue we need to take this group seriously as dangerously divisive and hateful. We should find their invocation of “Canada” and “European Canada” to be disturbing and hateful for the fictions such terms attempt to make of our multicultural, settler society.

Putting Canada First has powerfully worked to align the narrative of our hard-earned tax dollars to that of the greedy migrant. Saltzberg’s interviews attempt a dispassionate view of multiculturalism veiled as a waste of taxpayer resources, telling a Shaw Continue reading

Putting Canada First expresses concern on the future of English in Vancouver

Vancouver Anti-Chinese-Language Movement Focused On Chinese Language Signs, Advertisements

https://www.flickr.com/photos/gordweisflock/12278106995/in/set-72157640438912695
Vancouver, Canada Reuters

Canada’s West Coast hub, Vancouver, is home to a Chinese immigrant population so large that the city has earned the nickname “Hongcouver” and the title of“most Asian city” outside of Asia. The city’s Chinese have enriched the culture and created employment opportunities, but recently the growing number of Chinese-language signs and advertisements has sparked protests from some non-Chinese residents.

Brad Saltzberg, a North Vancouver resident, told the Vancouver Sun he takes issue with targeted Chinese advertising for real estate agents, financial planning and other products because it undermines “traditional English and French Canadian identity.”

Saltzberg is also the spokesperson and regional director for Putting Canada First, a nonprofit “dedicated to the maintenance and advancement of traditional Canadian identity, history and language.” It appears that Saltzberg isn’t the only one who has a problem with the increasing use of Chinese in public. Last week, stickers that said “Please Respect Canada’s Official Languages” covered Chinese-language advertisements in West Vancouver’s bus stations.   Continue reading

Metro Vancouver: Almost 4 in 10 of SUCCESS’s clients are from Mainland China

Mainland Chinese now benefit most from S.U.C.C.E.S.S.
June 3, 2013. 8:41 pm • Section: Immigration, The Search

Almost four in 10 of SUCCESS’s clients are from Mainland China. Newcomers from the People’s Republic of China have become the largest cohort by far of immigrants to Metro Vancouver, taking the place those from Hong Kong, who were the dominant group in the early 1990s. Continue reading

2012 CIC report reveals more than 60% of 600,000 immigrants unable to function in either of Canada’s official languages

Tighter language requirements will help immigrants and Canada
April 27, 2013. 9:59 am • Section: The Search, Immigration

It’s hard to learn a new language. An internal 2012 Immigration Canada report has revealed a rising proportion of immigrants, more than 600,000, work in Canada in a language other than English and French. And most of them, 60 per cent, say they cannot carry on a conversation in either of Canada’s official languages.

Stories regarding language barriers have become common in Canada.

The newcomer struggling to speak English who, as a result, has grave trouble trying to get a job. Continue reading

Quebec, Brossard Chinatown: More than one out of 10 residents are of Chinese origin

 Brossard Chinatown

À Brossard, plus d’un habitant sur dix est d’origine chinoise, soit la plus forte concentration pour une ville québécoise. Explorez les multiples facettes de cette communauté à travers les regards de cinq personnages. Une expérience interactive en français, en anglais et en chinois simplifié qui vous plonge au cœur de Brossard Chinatown.

In Brossard, more than one out of 10 residents are of Chinese origin, the highest concentration for a city in Quebec. Explore the many facets of this community through the profiles of different people. This interactive experience in English, French and simplified Chinese takes you to the heart of Brossard Chinatown.

Joe O’Connor: Is Canada a ‘country without a core culture’?

 

Dean Bicknell/Postmedia News
Just name it, and we have it here, in Canada, the land of 200 languages — including the two official ones. No matter where people are originally from, nearly 90% of us primarily speak English or French at home.

Multiculturalism in its controversial glory: Is Canada a ‘country without a core culture’?
Joe O’Connor | Oct 24, 2012 9:31 PM ET | Last Updated: Oct 24, 2012 9:32 PM ET
More from Joe O’Connor | @oconnorwrites

Dean Bicknell/Postmedia News
Just name it, and we have it here, in Canada, the land of 200 languages — including the two official ones. No matter where people are originally from, nearly 90% of us primarily speak English or French at home. Continue reading

Asian languages now account for 56 per cent of non-official languages in Canada, while just 40 per cent are of European origin

 

J.R. Almerol, a manager at Basha Foods International, says he has noticed that younger family members are less likely to keep up with their Filipino heritage by speaking the Filipino language Tagalog. The most recent census has showed an increase in second language speakers other than French.
Photograph by: Gavin Young , Calgary Herald

Rise of immigrant tongues makes Calgary a global city
Statistics Canada report says many speak Punjabi, Spanish and Chinese dialects
By Sherri Zickefoose, Calgary Herald October 25, 2012

J.R. Almerol, a manager at Basha Foods International, says he has noticed that younger family members are less likely to keep up with their Filipino heritage by speaking the Filipino language Tagalog. The most recent census has showed an increase in second language speakers other than French.
Photograph by: Gavin Young , Calgary Herald

CALGARY — Located along Barlow Trail in the city’s northeast stand two staples of Canadian taste: Tim Hortons and McDonald’s.

But tucked behind them, an international hub offers a different flavour of Calgary’s increasingly multicultural makeup. Continue reading