Category Archives: Multiculturalism

Columnist suggests that praying in library is perfectly acceptable

Ethically speaking: Not necessary to take offence over public prayer

Woman disturbed by prayer in library should worry about something else

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There's no need to be offended by the sight of a devoted person praying in public, Ken Gallinger writes. After all, there are many more things to take offence at, like wearing a racist T-shirt in public.

 

There’s no need to be offended by the sight of a devoted person praying in public, Ken Gallinger writes. After all, there are many more things to take offence at, like wearing a racist T-shirt in public.

By:  Ethically speaking columnist, Published on Sat Aug 23 2014

Iwas doing research in my local library and witnessed something disturbing. A lady had a towel on the floor and was doing her prayers. She would stand up, bow down, and repeat for 15 minutes. Prayer should be done in one’s own home or a religious building. I was offended because the library is a public place and I had to witness something that should be done elsewhere. What are your thoughts? Continue reading

TORONTO: After 47 years of living in Canada, feminist Ceta Ramkhalawansingh wants Canadian anthem be more “inclusive”

Toronto city councillor pushes for “O Canada” change

Ceta Ramkhalawansingh wants city council to ask Ottawa to make the national anthem more gender-inclusive.

By:  Staff Reporter, Published on Thu Aug 21 2014

In one of her only acts as a politician, interim city councillor Ceta Ramkhalawansingh wants to make history.

At Monday’s council meeting, Ramkhalawansingh will introduce a motion to request the federal government change the English words of Canada’s national anthem to be more gender inclusive.

If successful, singers of “O Canada” will eventually proclaim “true patriot love in all of us command” instead of “true patriot love in all thy sons command.”

“It’s about inclusion, and you’re really changing two words,” Ramkhalawansingh said.

Changing the national anthem requires an act of Parliament, not city council. But Ramkhalawansingh wants to push her colleagues in that direction.

“It’s my last city council meeting and I’m a feminist,” she said. “If you go back and look at the city’s history you will see the City of Toronto has provided leadership on many gender equality issues.”

The recommended word changes are based on the national “Sing all of us” campaign, founded by former prime minister Kim Campbell, author Margaret Atwood, Senator Nancy Ruth, former University of Toronto chancellor Vivienne Poy and educator Sally Goddard.

“It will be very interesting to see who supports and who may not support it,” Ramkhalawansingh said. “I can predict there will be a couple who won’t.”

Before joining city council, Ramkhalawansingh was a municipal civil servant for three decades and retired in 2010 as manager of diversity management and community engagement for the city.

(…)

__________

Ceta Ramkhalawansingh

Country of Origin:

Trinidad and Tobago

My name is Ceta Ramkhalawansingh, and I moved to Toronto in August 1967. I came with my family, which included my mother, my father, my brother and a sister. The five of us moved here in part because our parents wanted us to attend university in Canada. We moved from Trinidad and Tobago, and although there are very good schools there, I think that they thought that travel and living overseas would be a very good thing for us to do.

 

When I moved to Toronto in 1967, I attended one year of high school and then entered the University of Toronto, where I became very involved in a range of student activities, in addition to going to school, of course. I became very involved in student government, as well as various course union programs. At that point in time in 1968 onwards, there was a move afoot to change the curriculum of the University of Toronto towards a more integrated, interdepartmental approach to curriculum, rather than very rigid programs of study. I became very involved in advocating and working towards establishing a feminist studies program.

HALIFAX: ‘Muslim Canadian of African descent’ Mohamed Yaffa claims discrimination because of his ‘race, national or ethnic origin, colour and religion’

Halifax man alleges discrimination at Air Canada’s hands

Mohamed Yaffa, who specializes in diversity and inclusion, testified in ongoing case he faced “enhanced security screening” due to his skin colour and religion.

By:  Staff Reporter, Published on Tue Aug 19 2014

Mohamed Yaffa, a diversity and inclusion co-ordinator in Halifax, is demanding to know whether Air Canada trains its staff on just that: diversity and inclusion.

In a case currently before the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal, he alleges the airline subjected him to “enhanced security screening,” including “enhanced questioning,” on six different occasions from March to June 2010 because of his race, national or ethnic origin, colour and religion.

Yaffa, who describes himself in tribunal documents as “a Muslim Canadian of African descent,” is the diversity and inclusion co-ordinator for Capital Health, which provides health services in the Halifax region. He did not return several requests for comment. Continue reading

“Canadian” Farah Mohamed Shirdon dead while fighting for ISIS in Iraq

Farah Mohamed Shirdon of Calgary, fighting for ISIS, dead in Iraq, reports say

CBC News Posted: Aug 15, 2014 3:39 PM ET Last Updated: Aug 15, 2014 3:39 PM ET

Multiple social media reports in Iraq say that a young Calgary man who appeared in an ISIS video four months ago has been killed in Iraq.

Farah Mohamed Shirdon, a Calgarian fighting overseas with the militant group Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, was seen in the video burning his Canadian passport and threatening to destroy Iraq’s oppressors.

The Department of Foreign Affairs says it is aware of reports that a Canadian was killed in Iraq and is following the situation closely.

A man claiming to be Shirdon’s brother has been tweeting online — asking jihadi contacts for information on how Shirdon died.

Attempts by CBC News to reach Shirdon’s family in Calgary have so far been unsuccessful.

Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird told reporters following a news conference in London, Ont., he was aware of the reports but could not speak to the specific facts of the case.

(…)

___________

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2674736/ISIS-militants-declare-formation-caliphate-Syria-Iraq-demand-Muslims-world-swear-allegiance.html

Students express anger after anti-immigration flyers distributed at York University

Joshua Freeman, CP24.com
Published Thursday, August 14, 2014 4:47PM EDT
Last Updated Thursday, August 14, 2014 5:32PM EDT

Students at York University are expressing anger after racist posters were distributed around the campus and to nearby homes Wednesday.

The posters were found Wednesday at York’s Keele Street and Steeles Avenue campus and in mailboxes of nearby homes where many students live. The posters contain anti-immigrant messages that decry the shrinking majority of “White Canadians” on university campuses. Continue reading

TORONTO: CBSA allows Hindu priests to avoid female officers

‘The request is offensive to me as a woman,’ Pearson airport border guard tells CBC

CBC News Posted: Aug 07, 2014 3:59 PM ET Last Updated: Aug 07, 2014 7:13 PM ET

Canada Border Services Agency managers at Toronto’s Pearson airport allowed a small group of Hindu priests to avoid screening by female border guards to comply with their religious beliefs, CBC News has learned.

A CBSA officer, outraged that such a request would be considered, spoke exclusively to CBC News about what happened at Pearson’s Terminal 3 on the evening of Monday, July 28. Fearing she could be disciplined for speaking out, the officer spoke on the condition that her name and identity be withheld. Continue reading

VANCOUVER: Words like “racism” used as scarecrow when discussing the impact of rich Chinese immigrants on greater Vancouver

In Vancouver, race undercuts the discussion on affordability

IAN YOUNG

VANCOUVER — Special to The Globe and Mail

Published 

Last updated 

It helps to have a thick skin when reporting on the nexus between Chinese money and Vancouver’s sky-high property market. It also might help if that skin, like mine, isn’t white.

Accusations of racism flow thick and fast whenever an attempt is made to connect wealth-based immigration, primarily by rich Chinese, and housing prices here. Since influential condo marketer Bob Rennie delivered a speech to the Urban Development Institute in May, in which he said “sensational” stories making that link were “bordering on racism,” an array of industry figures have lined up to support his proposition.

But now, some in the Chinese community are pushing back. “Guys like Bob Rennie, they are trying to stop full conversation and intelligent conversation by using words like ‘racism,’” said long-time Chinatown activist David Wong. “People are afraid to speak when people start throwing that word around.”

Mr. Wong, an architect who has campaigned on behalf of impoverished Chinese immigrants, said it was vital to have a frank discussion about the impact of rich immigrants on greater Vancouver, where average detached house prices top $1.2-million. “Every time people want to talk about this, they get labelled a racist, especially if they are non-Asian,” said Wong. “That’s nonsense. We’ve got to talk about it. The politicians are gutless because they are afraid they are going to lose the so-called ethnic vote.” Continue reading

Suicide bombers in Canada?

David B. Harris, Special to QMI Agency

A tweet claims to show a picture of the Andre Poulin, who later became known as Abu Muslim. (Twitter)

A tweet claims to show a picture of the Andre Poulin, who later became known as Abu Muslim. (Twitter)

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 They say that when suicide belts explode, they fire the suicide-bomber’s head into the ceiling or sky. This simplifies the forensic work for examiners attempting to distinguish the attacker from his victims. Look for the head.

 This approach should simplify the forensic challenge when suicide bombing arrives in Canada – as, of course, it will.

There are several reasons why it’s coming.

First, we have what Hollywood would call “the talent.”

Our Islamist ranks are hugely reinforced by almost unparalleled, politically motivated – and economically unjustifiable – mass immigration from terror-producing countries where we have no meaningful capacity to do background checks. And the “homegrown” element may have helped Calgary alone contribute about two dozen to foreign jihad. Dozens more Somali-Canadian youth are estimated to have joined al-Shabaab terrorists, the group that destroyed a Kenyan shopping mall. Tellingly, this number outstrips per capita the size of the U.S. cadre that’s gone to jihad in Somalia and environs.

Remember Canadian suicide bomber Salman Ashrafi, who detonated in Iraq? And how about Timmins’ best, convert Andre Poulin who polished himself off in a Syrian death-charge? Let’s not forget the two key Canukistan players in the Algerian gas plant butchery, “martyrs” who had no prospect of outliving their operation.

 

UK commentator Douglas Murray claims “there are now at least twice as many young British Muslims who have gone to Syria” to fight for extremism, as “there are Muslims fighting for Queen and country here in the British armed forces.” One wonders how Canadian statistics compare, and what returning Canadian jihadis will have in mind.

Second, as the cop shows say, there’s intention.

U.S. SEAL operators found documents targeting Canada and a few other nations in Osama bin Laden’s lair. All of these countries have been hit, except Canada. And there’s no end to the Islamist hatred within our borders. Media reports revealed wives of Toronto 18 mass-terror accused held Canadians in searing contempt: “this filthy country,” was the best one could say about it. Another unsuccessfully tried to include as a condition of her marriage an undertaking that hubby would hit the jihad trail at the first opportunity.

Intention is reinforced by ugly propaganda. Look how terror-convict Momin Khawaja’s mummy would read grisly anti-infidel bedtime stories to her junior jihadi. Or Saudi Government Qur’ans, available in Canada, with Riyadh-approved scholars’ annotations about non-Muslims’ spiritual and physical “impurity.” In fact, “filthy as regards urine, stools and blood.”

When the average Canadian’s blood is written off as filthy, you’d better consider that there’s some terminal “othering” going on, the kind that could make you roadkill on someone’s personal expressway to paradise.

How about what moderate Muslims properly deride as the divisive “Muslim victimhood narrative” – exaggerated portrayals of Muslims as constant victims of non-Muslim fellow citizens – summarized in the Islamist-contrived word “Islamophobia”? The spin is a dangerous potential prompter of youth radicalism.

Such concerns triggered extraordinary Globe and Mail condemnations of Canadian Muslim personalities Mohamed Elmasry and Sheema Khan, the latter being the Globe’s own columnist – and founder of the deeply troubling National Council of Canadian Muslims (then called CAIR-CAN). The newspaper said their kind of hand-wringing about largely imaginary “backlash” put them among those “jostling for a spot on victimhood’s centre stage” in “a shamefully equivocal reply to terrorism.”

The third aspect favouring suicide attacks in Canada: location, location, location.

We have target-worthy locations. Canada is an almost absurdly open society with very accessible infrastructure. Shopping malls, office buildings, major events, energy generation and distribution. Think of all the carbomb-ready parking lots beneath city halls, court buildings and other such symbolic targets.

Canada must awaken before someone loses his head.

- A lawyer with 30 years’ experience in intelligence affairs, David B. Harris is director of the International Intelligence Program, INSIGNIS Strategic Research Inc.

Vancouver House Tower condos reserved for Asian buyers will have “asset management” program for absentee owners

 BY SAM COOPER, THE PROVINCE JULY 27, 2014

With its twisted sculptural design, the “iconic” $500-million Vancouver House is being marketed across Asia as a symbol of Vancouver’s future.

The 52-storey Westbank project alongside the north end of Granville Bridge is slated to open in 2018 and is being aggressively marketed in Asia, with up to half of the owners expected to buy from outside Canada.

According to the South China Morning Post, two sales offices were opened in Hong Kong in June.

Sales agents then visited China’s largest cities in search of buyers. And in July, Vancouver House units were marketed in Singapore. According to Singapore publications, Vancouver House condos were reserved for overseas buyers.

This week, Singapore-based website Property Guru reported there was an “overwhelming response” to the launch of Vancouver House, one of “Canada’s iconic buildings.”

“Vancouver House … saw more than 30 units transacted — far more than expected,” according to Property Guru.

“The response surprised us and surprised the developer,” an “excited” Singapore agent was quoted telling Property Guru, which reported a second “showcase” event was planned this week in Singapore. In mid-July The Business Times reported that of “388 units in the 52-storey tower, 30 units are reserved for the Singapore market, said Westbank’s marketing director Michael Braun.”

Westbank spokeswoman Jill Killeen said an initial September date to start selling to locals had been brought forward after Westbank received its disclosure statement last Thursday, ”making it legal to sell.”

“Our tracking indicates that more than 50 per cent of buyers will come from the Vancouver marketplace,” Killeen said in a prepared statement. Sales for local buyers will begin this week. Killeen said Westbank had been marketing to locals through print and television and had hosted an arts event under the bridge to generate interest.

In a story featuring an interview with Vancouver House developer Ian Gillespie, the South China Morning Post noted the building will have an “asset management” program for absentee owners, with staff periodically turning on taps and appliances in unoccupied units.

Gillespie said Vancouver House will be the most expensive building ever in Vancouver and units will be for art-collector-like buyers looking for “live-in sculpture.”

Vancouver House’s star architect, Bjarke Ingels, suggests the building — which will include revitalizing the space under the Granville Bridge at the 1400-block of Howe Street — is symbolic of “a giant curtain, at the moment of being pulled back to reveal the world to Vancouver and Vancouver to the world.” Continue reading