TORONTO: Disabled man told subsidized housing is for Muslims only

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Austin Lewis, 21, on Merton Street where he currently lives. Lewis has been rejected for subsidized housing at a unit because he is not Muslim. Lewis continues to look for a place to live.

RICK MADONIK / TORONTO STAR Order this photo

Austin Lewis, 21, on Merton Street where he currently lives. Lewis has been rejected for subsidized housing at a unit because he is not Muslim. Lewis continues to look for a place to live.

By:  Staff Reporter, Published on Wed Aug 26 2015

A young wheelchair user has been taken off the waiting list for a publicly subsidized apartment because he is not a member of the Muslim community that established the building — a practice that, while legal, raises concerns that accommodations for cultural and religious groups could be limiting access to affordable housing.

According to a letter that arrived at his mother’s house last week, Austin Lewis, 21, was removed from the waiting list at the Ahmadiyya Abode of Peace building on Finch Ave. W in North York because he is not a member of their faith.

University of Windsor Professor David M. Tanovich: “White, male lawyers should say ‘no’ to judicial appointments”

White, male lawyers should say ‘no’ to judicial appointments

DAVID TANOVICH

Contributed to The Globe and Mail

Published Last updated 

David M. Tanovich is a law professor at the Faculty of Law, , where he teaches in the areas of criminal law and legal ethics.

The latest round of federal judicial appointments in Ontario has further entrenched inequality in our courts and has led me to think about the following provocative question: Should white male lawyers have an ethical duty to say no the next time the federal justice minister comes calling, in order to force systemic change? In my view, the answer is yes.

It is not an understatement to say that we are in the midst of a crisis of representativeness in our federal judiciary.

2010: Lt.-Commander Wafa Dabbagh is the first member of the Canadian Forces to wear a hijab

The first member of the Canadian Forces to wear a hijab

A Tenacious Spirit; As the first member of the Canadian Forces to wear a hijab, Wafa Dabbagh is a pioneer and has risen to the ranks of lieutenant-commander.

By Louisa Taylor, Ottawa Citizen December 7, 2010 7:24 AM

Lt.-Commander Wafa Dabbagh was the first member of the military to wear a hijab. Her latest challenge is battling cancer, something the busy, energetic woman treats like a bothersome cold. Photograph by: Chris Mikula, The Ottawa Citizen

Spencer Fernando: “This is why I oppose the creation of a Racialized Representative.”

We are more than the colour of our skin

Posted November 5th, 2012 by Spencer Fernando
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ra·cial·ize

verb (used with object), ra·cial·ized, ra·cial·iz·ing.

1: To impose a racial interpretation on; place in a racial context.
2: To perceive, view, or experience in a racial context.
3: To categorize or differentiate on the basis of race.

CIR’s suggestions for new banknotes to reflect Canada’s diversity and multiculturalism

Toronto: Black students Devon Morris and Loyan Issa graduate from UCC after the school pays full freight for both

Principal Jim Power-The school hopes to see about 20 per cent of its 1,150 students on financial assistance in the next few years.

Two black youth graduate from UCC after studying there through a special scholarship
Published On Wed May 23 2012

Donovan Vincent
Staff Reporter

Devon Morris and Loyan Issa have the smarts to succeed at Upper Canada College in Toronto, but they didn’t have the financial means.

But thanks to a special scholarship launched by the prestigious school in 2007, the two young black men graduated Wednesday night and plan to move on to university educations.

Both started at the all-boys school in Grade 8. They learned about UCC’s financial assistance program through the African-Canadian Christian Network, which represents churches and support organizations in the black community.

A primary focus of the group is helping black youth succeed in school. The network has already sent 11 boys to UCC, and seven more will attend in September.

Under the program, UCC paid the full freight for Morris, 17, and Issa, 18. Tuition for the day program runs up to $30,000 a year, while the boarding program costs as much as $53,000.