University of Ottawa yoga class replaces white teacher with teacher of South Indian descent

University of Ottawa yoga class resumes with new teacher

A controversial yoga class at the University of Ottawa is back on — with a teacher of Indian background, who is wondering if she was hired because of her race.

Jennifer Scharf used to teach a free yoga class at the University of Ottawa before it was cancelled in late 2015 due to concerns about cultural "oppression."

Jennifer Scharf used to teach a free yoga class at the University of Ottawa before it was cancelled in late 2015 due to concerns about cultural “oppression.”

COURTESY JENNIFER SCHARF

Jennifer Scharf used to teach a free yoga class at the University of Ottawa before it was cancelled in late 2015 due to concerns about cultural “oppression.”

Little more than two months ago, many were outraged to hear that a yoga class at the University of Ottawa was cancelled. The problem wasn’t a lack of interest, the class’s teacher said. It was concerns that yoga was taken from India, a culture that “experienced oppression, cultural genocide and diasporas due to colonialism and western supremacy,” according to the group that once sponsored it.

For those enraged about political correctness and trigger warnings — and worried about free speech — on many university campuses, this appeared to be Exhibit A demonstrating that the youth of North America have gone crazy.

“Just take a semester at UOttawa, and you’ll have 100s of useless controversies thrown in your face,” one commenter wrote on the Facebook page of the campus group that cancelled the class. “Oh yeah, and your tuition money pays for that.”

Now, it appears the controversial class is back on — with a teacher of Indian background, who is wondering if she was hired because of her race.

“Nothing was brought to my attention to teach in a different way or do something differently than the other instructor because none of that was really mentioned to me,” Priya Shah, the new teacher, told the CBC.

TORONTO: Disabled man told subsidized housing is for Muslims only

  • Share on Facebook
  • Reddit this!
Austin Lewis, 21, on Merton Street where he currently lives. Lewis has been rejected for subsidized housing at a unit because he is not Muslim. Lewis continues to look for a place to live.

RICK MADONIK / TORONTO STAR Order this photo

Austin Lewis, 21, on Merton Street where he currently lives. Lewis has been rejected for subsidized housing at a unit because he is not Muslim. Lewis continues to look for a place to live.

By:  Staff Reporter, Published on Wed Aug 26 2015

A young wheelchair user has been taken off the waiting list for a publicly subsidized apartment because he is not a member of the Muslim community that established the building — a practice that, while legal, raises concerns that accommodations for cultural and religious groups could be limiting access to affordable housing.

According to a letter that arrived at his mother’s house last week, Austin Lewis, 21, was removed from the waiting list at the Ahmadiyya Abode of Peace building on Finch Ave. W in North York because he is not a member of their faith.

University of Windsor Professor David M. Tanovich: “White, male lawyers should say ‘no’ to judicial appointments”

White, male lawyers should say ‘no’ to judicial appointments

DAVID TANOVICH

Contributed to The Globe and Mail

Published Last updated 

David M. Tanovich is a law professor at the Faculty of Law, , where he teaches in the areas of criminal law and legal ethics.

The latest round of federal judicial appointments in Ontario has further entrenched inequality in our courts and has led me to think about the following provocative question: Should white male lawyers have an ethical duty to say no the next time the federal justice minister comes calling, in order to force systemic change? In my view, the answer is yes.

It is not an understatement to say that we are in the midst of a crisis of representativeness in our federal judiciary.

2010: Lt.-Commander Wafa Dabbagh is the first member of the Canadian Forces to wear a hijab

The first member of the Canadian Forces to wear a hijab

A Tenacious Spirit; As the first member of the Canadian Forces to wear a hijab, Wafa Dabbagh is a pioneer and has risen to the ranks of lieutenant-commander.

By Louisa Taylor, Ottawa Citizen December 7, 2010 7:24 AM

Lt.-Commander Wafa Dabbagh was the first member of the military to wear a hijab. Her latest challenge is battling cancer, something the busy, energetic woman treats like a bothersome cold. Photograph by: Chris Mikula, The Ottawa Citizen

Spencer Fernando: “This is why I oppose the creation of a Racialized Representative.”

We are more than the colour of our skin

Posted November 5th, 2012 by Spencer Fernando
No Comments

ra·cial·ize

verb (used with object), ra·cial·ized, ra·cial·iz·ing.

1: To impose a racial interpretation on; place in a racial context.
2: To perceive, view, or experience in a racial context.
3: To categorize or differentiate on the basis of race.

CIR’s suggestions for new banknotes to reflect Canada’s diversity and multiculturalism