HALIFAX: Two Chinese start mental health group for students from China

Halifax Chinese language mental health support group starting

Peer support group designed to reduce stress, isolation

By Shaina Luck, Nelson Xie, CBC News Posted: Aug 17, 2015 6:20 AM AT Last Updated: Aug 17, 2015 5:51 PM AT

Minzhou Sun (left) and Jinbo Chen are working to set up a mental health peer support group that will offer help in Chinese.

Minzhou Sun (left) and Jinbo Chen are working to set up a mental health peer support group that will offer help in Chinese. (Shaina Luck / CBC)

Two Chinese-Nova Scotians are setting up a mental health support service aimed at the growing community of international students from China.

They say there are few mental health options in other languages, and that causes many Mandarin and Cantonese speakers to turn away from help.

“I’ve always had a passion to help newcomers,” said Jinbo Chen, one of the organizers. “Mental health issues are one of the issues that I really care about.”

Chen moved to Halifax in 2002 as a university student, and remained in Halifax to work and raise a family. 

He says Chinese international students face stress and mental health issues for many reasons, including loneliness and isolation, workload, and parental expectations. 

“A high percentage of them, it’s not because they want to come here — their parents want them to come here,” Chen said. “If they cannot achieve a certain level or score, it might have some stress with their family.”

Chen said many students are also coming to university in their late teens or early 20s, and may struggle with issues such as what direction to take, addiction problems, or romantic problems, all of which could contribute to mental health problems.

‘They preferred to speak to a person who speaks Chinese’

Shut Out: Liberalism And The Attack On Anglo-Canada

Shut Out: Liberalism And The Attack On Anglo-Canada

by Brad Salzberg, Feb 2016

http://capforcanada.com

CP

Pierre Trudeau Source

When considering the cultural history of Canada, the proclamation that “Canada has no culture” has underlined much of the general narrative. Although the idea defies over a century of English and French Canadian identity, in recent decades an absence of culture has become an unfortunate  reality.

Canada’s new generation

Two elements in particular have led to this situation— Canada’s immigration and multicultural policies. Indeed, decade upon decade of mass immigration and institutionalized multiculturalism will do that to a nation.

It wasn’t always this way. Before 1967, the year the Liberal government of Lester Pearson introduced the “points system” for evaluating potential migrants, Canada was a fully functioning English and French bi-cultural nation. Several continental European communities, including Ukrainians and Italians, rounded out our overall citizenship. In fact, previous to the points system, 98% of Canada’s migrants came from European nations.

‘Not all diversity produces harmony’

Tensions linger for Hong Kong immigrants 2 decades after mass immigration

Debates over housing and signage continue to dog diversity harmony

By Elaine Chau, CBC News Posted: Jan 01, 2016 10:00 AM PT Last Updated: Jan 01, 2016 3:54 PM PT

Associate Producer for CBC Radio in Vancouver

Close

Wui Gwai: Hong Kong Homecoming 53:59

I can’t remember exactly when my parents told me we were immigrating from Hong Kong to Canada in 1992. All I remember, as a six-year-old, was my mom selling me on the idea by telling me about the swing set I would have at our new house. I didn’t appreciate what my parents were giving up; their jobs, family and friends, and the sense of security that came with all of that.

Only later did I understand why they, and thousands of others, did it — because they were scared of the unknowns around the handover of their home country in 1997, from the United Kingdom to the People’s Republic of China.

In the late 1980s and early 90s, the special administrative region of Hong Kong was the largest source of overseas immigrants to B.C. At the peak in 1994, 48,000 people moved to Canada, with 16,000 choosing to settle in B.C.

RICHMOND, B.C.: Condo-owners insist all meetings be conducted only in Mandarin

Mandarin-only condo meetings provoke human rights complaint in Richmond

Capture_2-richmondbcdemogrA group of Richmond condo owners has filed a complaint with the BC Human Rights Tribunal after allegedly being discriminated against by a new Chinese-speaking strata council.

Posted by: 

A group of English-speaking condo owners in Richmond say they’ve been squeezed out by other owners who insist all meetings be conducted only in Mandarin.

The dispute is being taken to the B.C. Human Rights Council, with the English owners saying they’re victims of race-based voting manipulation.

 

Here’s an excerpt from a Richmond News story by Graeme Wood:

A group of Richmond homeowners has filed a complaint with the BC Human Rights Tribunal after allegedly being discriminated against by a new Chinese-speaking strata council.

Andreas Kargut, who filed the claim on behalf of several other Wellington Court strata members, told the Richmond News a group of Mandarin-speaking homeowners purposefully voted to expel non-Mandarin speaking members from council.

Since then, the new council has moved to conduct all official business, including council meetings, in Mandarin.

“Anyone they deemed who was non-Mandarin speaking, they ousted,” said Kargut.

Pakistani Islamic school Al-Huda operating in Canada

Do Al-Huda schools’ conservative teachings breed extremism?

Tashfeen Malik, one of the San Bernardino shooters, attended an Al-Huda school in Pakistan for a year

By Aleksandra Sagan, CBC News Posted: Dec 10, 2015 4:52 AM ET Last Updated: Dec 10, 2015 5:06 AM ET

Tashfeen Malik, left, and her husband, Syed Rizwan Farook, right, died in a shootout with police hours after an attack on a holiday party in San Bernardino, Calif., on Wed. Dec. 2, 2015.

Tashfeen Malik, left, and her husband, Syed Rizwan Farook, right, died in a shootout with police hours after an attack on a holiday party in San Bernardino, Calif., on Wed. Dec. 2, 2015. (US Customs and Border Protection/Reuters)

 Photo of Aleksandra Sagan

(Note: CBC does not endorse and is not responsible for the content of external links.)

A popular network of Islamic religious schools for women, which espouses a conservative ideology, is facing questions about its teachings after revelations that Tashfeen Malik, one of the San Bernardino shooters, and at least four other women who attempted to join ISIS studied there.Media placeholder

The school’s founder, Pakistan-born Farhat Hashmi who lived in Canada for several years, has denied any links to extremist groups. She said in a statement on her website following the shootings in San Bernardino, Calif., that the schools preach non-violence and promote only a peaceful message of Islam.

“No organization can be held responsible for personal acts of any of its students,” Hashmi’s statement reads, adding a truly devout Muslim “will never involve (themselves) in violent acts.”

But critics of these teachings warn immersion in a conservative religious community can make people more susceptible to radicalization for a number of reasons.

Kitchener Muslim school principal says it’s difficult to explain anti-niqab public sentiment to students

Principal, students wear hijab, one teacher wears niqab at Maple Grove School

CBC News Posted: Oct 09, 2015 2:42 PM ET Last Updated: Oct 09, 2015 5:14 PM ET

Rania Lawendy is the academic advisor for a new Islamic-based private school opening in Kitchener. Rania Lawendy is the academic advisor for a new Islamic-based private school opening in Kitchener. (Andrea Bellemare/CBC)

A Kitchener school principal says that the federal Conservatives are “bullying” a minority of women in the country who wear niqabs, in an effort to score political points.

The Conservatives pledged to ensure public service workers don’t wear them on the job, after the government lost a court case and an appeal to prevent women from taking a citizenship oath while wearing a niqab. Both the Liberals and the NDP have criticized the proposal.

Rania Lawendy, the principal of the Muslim Association of Canada’s Maple Grove School in Kitchener wears a hijab, as do some of the students, and one of her teachers on staff wears a niqab.

She said it’s difficult to explain anti-niqab public sentiment to the children at school.

“I don’t believe that the majority of Canadians feel this way.”-Rania Lawendy,  principal at the Muslim Association of Canada’s Maple Grove School in Kitchener

“I think they’re upset about all the attention that it’s garnering by the Conservatives. Some of the students have mentioned, and I would agree with them, that they feel like the Conservative Party is trying to gain political points by bullying, really, a minority of women,” she said.