Burgers ‘N Fries Forever’s owner says their meat has been halal since ever

‘It’s 2015’: Ottawa burger joint responds to anti-Muslim comments

Burgers ‘N Fries Forever’s owner says responses to halal toppings include: “I’m not going to eat here because you include Muslims.”

An Ottawa burger joint quoted Prime Minster Justin Trudeau to respond to anti-Muslim Facebook commenters who apparently didn’t like the fact that halal beef bacon was an option on the menu.

In a sponsored post on Facebook, Burgers ‘N Fries Forever advertised the burger topping – made from the belly of a cow as opposed to a pig – alongside a photo of three Muslim women wearing a hijab about to take a bite out of a burger.

Indo-Canadian women perpetuate gender inequality by practicing female foeticide in Canada

Indo-Canadian women give birth to far more boys than women born in Canada

The implication is that the disproportionate ratios are a result of “sex discrimination fuelled by son preference,” a study says.

 Baldev Mutta (centre), CEO of Brampton's Punjabi Community Health Services, is surrounded by his grand daughter Talon Mutta, 9 (left) and daughter Rakhi Mutta. Mutta is involved in initiatives to celebrate girls born to Indian parents. New research that says there is deficit of more than 4,000 girls to Indian-born parents in Canada, possibly linked to repeated second trimester abortions.BERNARD WEIL / TORONTO STAR Order this photo

Baldev Mutta (centre), CEO of Brampton’s Punjabi Community Health Services, is surrounded by his grand daughter Talon Mutta, 9 (left) and daughter Rakhi Mutta. Mutta is involved in initiatives to celebrate girls born to Indian parents. New research that says there is deficit of more than 4,000 girls to Indian-born parents in Canada, possibly linked to repeated second trimester abortions.

A preference for boys among Indian-born parents may have contributed to a deficit of more than 4,400 girls over two decades in what researchers in a new study are calling Canada’s “missing girls.”

The research, presented in the Canadian Medical Association Journal and the online CMAJ Open, looks at more than 6 million births in Canada and reveals that a greater presence of boys among Indian-born mothers may in part be linked to abortions in the second trimester, when parents can learn the baby’s sex.

The birth data was compiled from databases administered by Statistics Canada and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences in Toronto between 1990 and 2011, and 1993 to 2012, respectively.

“The main implication is that among some immigrant communities, males are placed at a higher value than females. This is not just about abortions, it is about gender equality,” said lead author Marcelo Urquia of St. Michael’s Hospital. “I hope that this is conducive to a respectful debate on the value of girls and women in today’s Canadian society.”

His study newly exposes a relationship between induced abortions and the previously reported large numbers of boys among Ontario’s Indian community, said Urquia, noting the data likely explains an imbalance in the rest of Canada too. Some of the “deficit” of girls may be due to “implantation of male embryos,” said Urquia, but the data is insufficient.

While the natural odds of having a boy over a girl are slightly higher, they are consistent across the globe: up to 107 boys for every 100 girls. But Indian-born mothers living in Canada with two children had 138 boys for every 100 girls. In Ontario, that number inflated even more among Indian-born women with two daughters, who then gave birth to 196 boys for every 100 girls.

After abortions, the numbers rise dramatically: 326 boys after one abortion, 409 boys after multiple abortions, and 663 boys for every 100 girls following multiple abortions in the second trimester, when doctors can determine the sex of the fetus.

Miscarriages, or spontaneous abortions, were not linked to the births of more boys, the study found.

(…)

Chinese cemetery remains a cornerstone of Kamloops history

The main gate to the Chinese Cemetery in Kamloops.
(JENNIFER STAHN /InfoTel Multimedia)
March 26, 2016 – 11:30 AM

KAMLOOPS – When Chinese Consul-General Liu Fei encouraged Kamloops’s Chinese community to explore and preserve their heritage in the city in 2013, Elsie Cheung went right to work on the most egregious omission — searching for the records from the Chinese Cemetery, the final resting place for many of the community’s earliest settlers.

The cemetery is also the final remnant of Kamloops’s historic Chinatown, a once bustling community which made up roughly one-third of the city’s population in 1890. Trouble is since the late 1970s, all the gravemarkers were accidentially removed. After no luck with the city’s records or at the library, Cheung went to the museum and the city’s archives and eventually found burial records from the city’s early days to 1970. She set out to find as much information as she could, going through the pages one at a time to find the lost names.

“I know that the names would be there, it was just to find them,” Cheung says. “I had to sit there. I took pictures. Every time I saw ‘Chinese Cemetery’ I took a picture, then I downloaded them and read over them (later).” 

Edmonton Freedom Talk : Valerie Price and Alexandra Belair speeches

Youtube: Valerie Price – The Financial Cost of Refugee Resettlement in Canada

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIsV_XEcmcA

 

Youtube – Alexandra Belair on Europe’s migration crisis

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P1Rv2U1t87c&feature=youtu.be

 

Shafia appeal: Expert’s ‘honour killing’ testimony wasn’t cultural profiling, Crown says

Shafia appeal: Expert’s ‘honour killing’ testimony wasn’t cultural profiling, Crown says

Appeal hearing for Shafia family wraps up in Toronto, judges reserve decision

By Ron Charles, CBC News Posted: Mar 04, 2016 5:00 AM ET Last Updated: Mar 04, 2016 3:37 PM ET

Mohammad Shafia, Hamed Shafia and Tooba Yahya are all serving life sentences with no chance of parole for 25 years for the 2009 murder of four female members of their family. Their defence teams are arguing in Ontario appeal court that they deserve a new trial.

Mohammad Shafia, Hamed Shafia and Tooba Yahya are all serving life sentences with no chance of parole for 25 years for the 2009 murder of four female members of their family. Their defence teams are arguing in Ontario appeal court that they deserve a new trial. (Lars Hagberg/Reuters)

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Expert testimony on the practice of so-called honour killing did not prejudice the jury against three members of the Shafia family convicted in 2012 of murdering four female relatives, the Crown argued in an Ontario appeal court Friday. 

SIKH COMMUNITY: Surjit Singh Badesha and his sister Malkit Kaur Sidhu accused of “honour” killing, Canadian court stops deportation to India

Canadian court stops honour killing accused’s deportation

    • Indo Asian News Service, Hindustan Times, Toronto
  • Updated: Feb 27, 2016 17:36 IST
NRI Jaswinder with husband Sukhwinder Singh (Mithu). Jaswinder was killed by men allegedly hired by her mother Malkit Kaur (top right) and uncle Surjit Singh Badesha.

A Canadian court has stopped the deportation of a man and his sister to India to face trial for the honour killing of the man’s niece in Punjab on grounds that they may not get justice in India.

Surjit Badesha and his sister Malkit Sidhu had hired contract killers to eliminate Malkit’s daughter Jassi (Jaswinder) Sidhu in June 2000 because she had married a lower-caste autorickshaw driver in Punjab.

Canada-born Jaswinder had met autorickshaw driver Sukhwinder Singh (Mithu) in Jagraon during her visit to Punjab in 1996 and fallen in love with him. The two secretly married in 1999 when she came back from Canada to tie the knot.

Jaswinder was murdered in June 2000 near Sukhwinder’s village.

Punjab Police investigations confirmed it was an honour killing plotted by Jaswinder’s mother Malkit and her uncle Badesha while the two were in Canada.

Based on the evidence of 266 phone calls that Badesha made with the hired killers, India formally requested Canada in 2005 to extradite him and Malkit to face trial.

In May 2014, the British Columbia Supreme Court in Vancouver ordered that Jaswinder’s uncle and mother must be deported to India to face trial.

But on Friday, British Columbia’s appeal court overturned the deportation order against the mother and uncle of Jaswinder , citing India’s “appalling” record in regard to prisoners.

Justice Ian Donald wrote in a two-to-one decision: “In my view, there is a valid basis for concern that the applicants will be subjected to violence, torture and/or neglect if surrendered.”