TORONTO: David Eminess and Quinn Taylor shot and killed outside Chinatown restaurant

Police identify Chinatown shooting victims

David Eminess, 26, and Quinn Taylor, 29, were shot and killed outside a Chinatown restaurant.

David Eminess, 26, was one of two men killed in a downtown shooting in the early morning of Jan 31.

David Eminess, 26, was one of two men killed in a downtown shooting in the early morning of Jan 31. TORONTO POLICE SERVICE

By: Vjosa Isai Staff Reporter, Published on Tue Feb 02 2016

Toronto police have released the identities of two men killed in a downtown shooting in the early morning of Jan. 31.

David Eminess, 26, and Quinn Taylor, 29, were shot after a fight erupted outside New Ho King on Spadina Ave. near Nassau St. at 3:15 a.m.

Paramedics declared one victim dead on the scene. A second man died in hospital several hours later, police said.

Three others were shot and sustained non-life-threatening injuries.

(…)

TORONTO: Quinn Taylor one of the men killed in a Sunday morning shooting in Chinatown

Spadina shooting victim identified as Quinn Taylor, 29

Victim’s mother remembers Quinn as a joyful father and passionate musician.

 Quinn Taylor, 29, has been identified by his mother as one of the men killed in a Sunday morning shooting in Chinatown.

INSTAGRAM.

Quinn Taylor, 29, has been identified by his mother as one of the men killed in a Sunday morning shooting in Chinatown.

A man gunned down in Chinatown early Sunday morning has been identified as 29-year-old Quinn Taylor, a budding Toronto rap artist and father to a 1-year-old girl.

His mother, Brenda Macintyre, confirmed to the Star Monday evening that her son was one of two men killed when shots rang out on Spadina Ave. near Nassau St. just after 3 a.m. Sunday.

“I’m just basically numb. It’s like, what the hell?” Macintyre said. “My son was just in the prime of his life, really super happy, happiest he’d ever been, and then all of a sudden he’s gone for no good reason.”

Shut Out: Liberalism And The Attack On Anglo-Canada

Shut Out: Liberalism And The Attack On Anglo-Canada

by Brad Salzberg, Feb 2016

http://capforcanada.com

CP

Pierre Trudeau Source

When considering the cultural history of Canada, the proclamation that “Canada has no culture” has underlined much of the general narrative. Although the idea defies over a century of English and French Canadian identity, in recent decades an absence of culture has become an unfortunate  reality.

Canada’s new generation

Two elements in particular have led to this situation— Canada’s immigration and multicultural policies. Indeed, decade upon decade of mass immigration and institutionalized multiculturalism will do that to a nation.

It wasn’t always this way. Before 1967, the year the Liberal government of Lester Pearson introduced the “points system” for evaluating potential migrants, Canada was a fully functioning English and French bi-cultural nation. Several continental European communities, including Ukrainians and Italians, rounded out our overall citizenship. In fact, previous to the points system, 98% of Canada’s migrants came from European nations.

Justin Pierre James Trudeau , the 23rd and current Prime Minister of Canada

From a purely cultural perspective, the most transformative event in our history was the Liberal government’s introduction of Multiculturalism in 1971. Spearheaded by former Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, this policy was the catalyst by which Canada officially transitioned from a bi-cultural to a multicultural society.

Sometimes in life, as well as in politics, there are winners and losers. Nowhere is this more apparent than in the post-multicultural fate of the largest segment of our society—English Canada. Despite an immeasurable and undeniable cultural contribution, modern society has informed English Canada their collective identity belongs at the bottom of the barrel.

“Ethnic” pride? Step right up. Gay pride? Join the parade. French-Canadian pride— good to go— just be careful not to offend anyone down at the local mosque. Anglo-Canadian pride? Now that is racist.

Pourquoi? It is possible no one knows the answer to such a question. What we do know, however, is that within Canadian society it is entirely taboo to display any measure of pride in being a Canadian of European descent.

NOVA SCOTIA: Doreze Marvin Beals, 19, charged with human trafficking, sex assault of 15-year-old girl

Doreze Beals testifies at his human trafficking trial

North Preston man, 19, charged with human trafficking, sex assault of 15-year-old girl

By Blair Rhodes, CBC News Posted: Jan 29, 2016 9:14 AM AT Last Updated: Jan 29, 2016 5:29 PM AT

The trial of Doreze Marvin Beals, charged with human trafficking and sex assault of a 15-year-old girl in April 2014, resumed Friday in Nova Scotia Supreme Court.

The trial of Doreze Marvin Beals, charged with human trafficking and sex assault of a 15-year-old girl in April 2014, resumed Friday in Nova Scotia Supreme Court. (CBC)

A Nova Scotia man on trial for human trafficking took the stand in his own defence Friday, testifying the alleged victim was not sexually assaulted and was only hidden in a cellar because she feared her mother.

Doreze Beals, 19, of North Preston is accused of kidnapping a young girl, sexually assaulting her and threatening to force her into prostitution. The charges stem from incidents in North Preston in April 2014.

Deepan Budlakoti’s appeal to be declared Canadian citizen dismissed by Supreme Court

Deepan Budlakoti’s appeal to be declared Canadian citizen dismissed by Supreme Court

Federal Court of Appeal had ruled against Deepan Budlakoti in June 2015

CBC News Posted: Jan 28, 2016 12:25 PM ET Last Updated: Jan 28, 2016 12:25 PM ET

Deepan Budlakoti, pictured outside the Supreme Court building in Ottawa in June 2014, had his citizenship appeal dismissed with costs on Thursday.

Deepan Budlakoti, pictured outside the Supreme Court building in Ottawa in June 2014, had his citizenship appeal dismissed with costs on Thursday. (The Canadian Press)

Canada’s top court on Thursday dismissed, with costs, the case of a twice-convicted Ottawa man who was born in Canada but was never granted Canadian citizenship.

Under Canadian law, citizenship by birth doesn’t apply to people whose parents were in Canada as diplomats or representatives of a foreign government, or whose parents were employed by such a person, at the time of their birth.

When Deepan Budlakoti was born in Ottawa in 1989, his parents were both Indian nationals working for the Indian High Commission.

In 1992, Budlakoti’s parents were granted permanent resident status. They applied for citizenship for themselves but not for their son. Their application was accepted.

Former UBC president Arvind Gupta breaks silence about mysterious resignation

Brian Hutchinson: Former UBC president breaks silence about mysterious resignation

Brian Hutchinson | January 29, 2016 6:10 PM ET
More from Brian Hutchinson | @hutchwriter

Former UBC president Arvind Gupta: “I decided a public confrontation would not be in (the university’s) best interests.”

Arlen Redekop/Postmedia News/File Former UBC president Arvind Gupta: “I decided a public confrontation would not be in (the university’s) best interests.”

VANCOUVER – Another month, another screwup at the University of British Columbia, where internal investigations, apologies and loss of face now seem as routine, and unwelcome, as frosh week hazing.

One of Canada’s largest post-secondary institutions, UBC has seen four separate investigations in the past six months alone, including such serious matters as sexual assaults on campus.

This week, another controversy that had been simmering for months boiled over when the school’s gaffe-prone administration made public certain documents it wanted kept secret.

The “private” material formed part of a larger package shared by UBC on Wednesday in response to freedom-of-information requests; these related to the sudden departure of Arvind Gupta, the university’s short-lived president.

Gupta resigned his position last summer, after just 13 months on the job. He quit without offering any explanation to the public, UBC faculty members or the school’s 60,000 students. Alarm bells rang: As an academic institution, UBC is supposed to cherish transparency.

Into the information vacuum rushed speculation. One UBC professor suggested that Gupta, a soft-spoken computer scientist, had lost a “masculinity contest” to certain members of the school’s board of governors. Board chairman John Montalbano, a Vancouver-based businessman, took umbrage. He called out the professor; this led to another kerfuffle. And, eventually, to Montalbano’s own resignation as UBC chairman.

Recent immigrants bring foreign pensions but worry how to build retirement security in Canada

Recent immigrants bring foreign pensions but worry how to build retirement security in Canada

Andrew Allentuck | January 29, 2016 10:42 AM ET
More from Andrew Allentuck

In Alberta, a couple we’ll call Burt, 48, and Ethel, 45, have three children — twins age 14 and a son just edging into his teen years. New Canadians, they arrived in 2008 with the kids, got jobs in a large health care organization, and brought entitlements to foreign pensions when they retire. They bring home $9,013 a month from two jobs that pay, in total, about $170,000 a year.It seems a simple situation: raise the kids and then retire on pensions, including transferred credits from former foreign employment, Canada Pension Plan and partial Old Age Security benefits. Their concern as relatively new residents is to build security in a financial system that remains unfamiliar.

“What will our retirement look like?” Burt asks, reflecting a degree of bewilderment about the alphabet soup of RRSPs, RRIFs, TFSAs and many other abbreviated plans. “What do we have to do to build security? ”

(Email andrew.allentuck@gmail.com for a free Family Finance analysis)

Teacher reprimanded for calling Muslim student ‘Taliban’, agrees to take re-education course

Teacher reprimanded for calling Muslim student ‘Taliban’

Matthew Shaun Pell also agreed to take a course on ‘Building Cultural Intelligence’ in the workplace

CBC News Posted: Jan 28, 2016 4:32 PM PT Last Updated: Jan 28, 2016 4:36 PM PT

Sooke math teacher Matthew Shaun Pell has been reprimanded for referring to a Muslim student as ‘Taliban’.

A Vancouver Island high school teacher has been reprimanded for repeatedly referring to a Muslim student as ‘Taliban” in front of other students.

According to a consent resolution agreement posted by B.C.’s Commissioner for Teacher Regulation, Matthew Shaun Pell also made “comments such as ‘don’t make her angry otherwise she’ll bomb you’ or ‘she’s going to blow everything up.'”

The incidents happened in 2014 in Pell’s Grade 11 math class in the Sooke school district.

The student’s family background was Middle Eastern and Muslim.

“Pell’s comments made Student A and her classmates, feel very uncomfortable,” the consent resolution reads.

The Sooke district issued Pell a warning letter in May 2015. The teacher regulation branch released their decision this month.

According to the agreement, Pell admitted that his actions constituted professional misconduct.

He has also agreed to complete a course called Building Cultural Intelligence in Your Workplace by the end of June 2016.