Vancouver real estate website gives Chinese-language speakers an advantage

[Screengrab of Vanfun.com’s home page]

Chinese-speaking real estate investors are getting a bit of a jump on buyers using the public Multiple Listing Service (MLS) website thanks to a Shanghai-based website posting Vancouver listings from the realtor MLS up to a few days before they’re publicly available.

In Canada, licensed realtors get the opportunity to see new listings 48 hours before they hit the public MLS site. But Dan Morrison of the Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver told Global Newsthat the Chinese-language Vanfun.com skirts that process.

“It’s pretty frustrating. It’s taking our copyrighted information and using it against our rules,” Morrison told the news outlet. “If they are getting access to our information on our system, if someone is giving them those numbers…that’s clearly against our rules.”

Although the website, owned by Shanghai Ruiying Internet Technology, doesn’t seem to have ties to any Vancouver real estate agencies, it offers tours, splits commissions with local realtors, and claims to be working with major banks.

Chinese-Canadian community honours Vancouver’s Modernize Tailors, pioneer family

Chinese-Canadian community honours Vancouver’s Modernize Tailors, pioneer family

Tailor shop opened in 1913 by Wong Kung Lai and has supplied suits to people like Sean Connery

By Gavin Fisher, Elaine Chau, CBC News Posted: Apr 09, 2016 4:42 PM PT Last Updated: Apr 10, 2016 10:46 AM PT

A 1946 photograph of Wong Kung Lai (bottom, second from right) with his children, and brother-in-law Chu (bottom, in uniform) who introduced him to his wife.

A 1946 photograph of Wong Kung Lai (bottom, second from right) with his children, and brother-in-law Chu (bottom, in uniform) who introduced him to his wife. (Courtesy Maurice Wong)

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Modernize Tailors, Wong family honoured for contribution to Chinese-Canadian community in Vancouver 6:57

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In 1911 Wong Kung Lai was chosen by his small village in China to go and settle in Canada, with the village paying for his passage across the Pacific as well as the $500 head tax at the time.

“They probably saw him as the boy most likely to succeed,” said his son Maurice Wong, who added that as a young child his father used to walk for hours to bring to market the bok choy his family had grown.

Indo-Canadian women perpetuate gender inequality by practicing female foeticide in Canada

Indo-Canadian women give birth to far more boys than women born in Canada

The implication is that the disproportionate ratios are a result of “sex discrimination fuelled by son preference,” a study says.

 Baldev Mutta (centre), CEO of Brampton's Punjabi Community Health Services, is surrounded by his grand daughter Talon Mutta, 9 (left) and daughter Rakhi Mutta. Mutta is involved in initiatives to celebrate girls born to Indian parents. New research that says there is deficit of more than 4,000 girls to Indian-born parents in Canada, possibly linked to repeated second trimester abortions.BERNARD WEIL / TORONTO STAR Order this photo

Baldev Mutta (centre), CEO of Brampton’s Punjabi Community Health Services, is surrounded by his grand daughter Talon Mutta, 9 (left) and daughter Rakhi Mutta. Mutta is involved in initiatives to celebrate girls born to Indian parents. New research that says there is deficit of more than 4,000 girls to Indian-born parents in Canada, possibly linked to repeated second trimester abortions.

A preference for boys among Indian-born parents may have contributed to a deficit of more than 4,400 girls over two decades in what researchers in a new study are calling Canada’s “missing girls.”

The research, presented in the Canadian Medical Association Journal and the online CMAJ Open, looks at more than 6 million births in Canada and reveals that a greater presence of boys among Indian-born mothers may in part be linked to abortions in the second trimester, when parents can learn the baby’s sex.

The birth data was compiled from databases administered by Statistics Canada and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences in Toronto between 1990 and 2011, and 1993 to 2012, respectively.

“The main implication is that among some immigrant communities, males are placed at a higher value than females. This is not just about abortions, it is about gender equality,” said lead author Marcelo Urquia of St. Michael’s Hospital. “I hope that this is conducive to a respectful debate on the value of girls and women in today’s Canadian society.”

His study newly exposes a relationship between induced abortions and the previously reported large numbers of boys among Ontario’s Indian community, said Urquia, noting the data likely explains an imbalance in the rest of Canada too. Some of the “deficit” of girls may be due to “implantation of male embryos,” said Urquia, but the data is insufficient.

While the natural odds of having a boy over a girl are slightly higher, they are consistent across the globe: up to 107 boys for every 100 girls. But Indian-born mothers living in Canada with two children had 138 boys for every 100 girls. In Ontario, that number inflated even more among Indian-born women with two daughters, who then gave birth to 196 boys for every 100 girls.

After abortions, the numbers rise dramatically: 326 boys after one abortion, 409 boys after multiple abortions, and 663 boys for every 100 girls following multiple abortions in the second trimester, when doctors can determine the sex of the fetus.

Miscarriages, or spontaneous abortions, were not linked to the births of more boys, the study found.

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Jill Andrew, co-founder of the Body Confidence Canada Awards, militates for fat acceptance

Activist seeks to make size, shape and weight discrimination illegal in Ontario

She says weight deserves the same attention as discrimination by age, sex, disability, ethnic origin and sexual orientation.

Body image advocate Jill Andrew is working to have a person’s size, shape and weight protected against discrimination in the Ontario Human Rights Code.

Body image advocate Jill Andrew is working to have a person’s size, shape and weight protected against discrimination in the Ontario Human Rights Code.

LIZ BEDDALL/METRO / METRO Order this photo

Body image advocate Jill Andrew is working to have a person’s size, shape and weight protected against discrimination in the Ontario Human Rights Code.

A Toronto activist wants to make it illegal to discriminate against someone based on their size, shape or weight.

Jill Andrew, co-founder of the Body Confidence Canada Awards, is meeting Wednesday with the province’s human rights commissioner to discuss possible changes to the Ontario Human Rights Code.

Rena Mandhane

Rena Mandhane | Jim Rankin/Toronto Star

Weight deserves the same attention as other basis for discrimination that are protected by the code today, including age, sex, disability, ethnic origin and sexual orientation, Andrew said.

“All of the same social and cultural stereotypes that are wrongly linked to being fat — being lazy or being unintelligent or lacking energy — have fed into employers who discriminate against people who are looking for work or to be promoted,” she said.

If the her proposal is adopted, it would be illegal to discriminate against a person — to fire them or refuse to rent an apartment to them, for example — because of their weight.

Andrew got the opportunity to make her case to when she spoke alongside Rena Mandhane, who heads Ontario’s Human Rights Commission, at a recent event for women in politics in Toronto.

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The Express Entry program will bring more cooks than engineers into Canada

In its first year, the Express Entry program allowed more cooks and food workers than engineers and professors to apply

Canada’s Express Entry immigration favours low-wage workers: Experts

In its first year, the Express Entry program allowed more cooks and food workers than engineers and professors to apply

The results of a new immigration program meant to match the flow of foreign workers with Canada’s job market should be a wake up call for policymakers, experts say.

Under the new Express Entry system, immigrants applying for low-wage, precarious jobs in Canada are being favoured over those applying for more professional positions, said Toronto immigration consultant Parmjit Mangat.

Do Canadians share Trudeau’s vision for Canada?

Canada Icon by Dustwin

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau dismisses the idea of defining a country based on national identity

Justin Trudeau And The Dismantling Of Canadian Identity

writer: Brad Salzberg, April 2016

http://capforcanada.com

Justin Trudeau, Prime Minister of Canada, is a man with a vision for his country. What remains unknown, however, is whether or not Canadians share this vision.

Thus far in his tenure, Trudeau has been far more explicit about what he does not want for Canada than he has been regarding the kind of nation he envisions for our future.

One thing he does not want, as publicly stated shortly after taking office, is a Canada based upon “national identity.” This bold assertion, in effect, tells us Trudeau does not believe in a Canada defined by a national heritage developed over 148 years of history. From Canada’s early pioneer settlers, to our cultural roots as an English and French Canadian society, through to the struggle for an identity independent of American cultural domination— Justin Trudeau has deemed these symbols of our nationhood to be irrelevant. 

There are three signs that Trudeau is steering Canada towards the cliff of state-enforced multiculturalism

Trudeau adopting wrong immigration approach

Candice Malcolm

BY

FIRST POSTED: | UPDATED:

Justin Trudeau
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau takes part in the opening plenary session during the Nuclear Security Summit in Washington, D.C., on Friday, April 1, 2016. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

The devastating wars of the Middle East have now spilt into Europe, thanks to decades of careless immigration and integration policies.

Europeans are not responsible for the rise of Islamist extremism, but Europe’s leaders are to blame for allowing terrorist agents to infiltrate European communities and set up extensive networks throughout the continent.

Canada has thus far managed to avoid the same fate, thanks to our unique approach to migration. Canada’s immigration system is more selective, we have better security and screening measures, and our integration model is more deliberate and delivers better results than Europe.

There is, unfortunately, reason to believe that this Canadian advantage is disappearing. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau seems to be abandoning Canada’s long history of successful immigration and integration and adopting the failed European approach – a government-enforced multiculturalism that seeks to accommodate rather than integrate newcomers.

There are three signs that Trudeau is steering Canada towards the cliff of state-enforced multiculturalism.

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What does it mean to be a good citizen?

Canadian Philippine Inquirer – Making a contribution as a New Canadian

By Ashton College on April 7, 2016

(Photo by Gavin St. Ours/Flickr)

(Photo by Gavin St. Ours/Flickr)

Here’s a question: what does it mean to be a good citizen? Chances are that if you were to walk down the street and ask people this question the common denominator would be “making a contribution.” Canadians pride themselves on many things and this pride is well known. So much so in fact that the simple act of sewing a maple leaf on your backpack while travelling is almost guaranteed to bring smiles from new friends.

For new Canadians, the process of immigration is an often confusing journey of paperwork, travel, and learning the ins and outs of a new culture. But once the nuances of the immigration process have been taken care of the one thing that all immigrants want to do more than anything else is contribute. It’s a common thread that binds people from across the globe together; the desire for self-improvement and the betterment of the society they live in. And it’s no different with new Canadians.